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Peak design leash a hidden gem as an alternative strap? (1 Viewer)

muxo

Member
Hello,


I've been looking at straps to replace the stock ones that came with my Nikon MHG's.

One issue with straps is being able to quickly remove them so I can mount the bins on a tripod without the strap getting in the way.

It looks like quick-releases are quite popular for this use-case and Maven sells such quick release strap systems.

I came across this alternative design:
https://www.peakdesign.com/products/leash
It's the Peak Design leash. Instead of quick locks it uses a clever snap system, which is interchangeable with other straps. Peak design looks to sell many products aimed at the photographer community, so I don't think many birders are aware of their offerings. I'm thinking of plunging in and testing them out.
I'm curious, has anyone else used these? Would there be any disadvantages to this system vs a traditional quick release system, e.g.: https://mavenbuilt.com/products/bin...57639110&pr_ref_pid=7458488518&pr_seq=uniform
 

PeterPS

MEMBER
Great find, I was not aware of the Peak Design leash. I am using traditional quick release connectors---- I don't think they have any advantage over the neat Peak Design (PD) connectors, except for the fact that the former can be used with any strap whereas the latter seem to require the PD strap.
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
The design has a number of attractive aspects. And I particularly like how the anchor disk is seated in a recess,
so that there isn’t constant load on the locking system (unlike the Maven and many other designs)

However, a note of caution . . .
The problem with any quick detachable system is that it may do so when you don’t want it to

I Googled ‘peak design leash failure’ and there have been problems that resulted in several product revisions
Also see Peak Design’s own site at: https://support.peakdesign.com/hc/en-us/articles/360000833866

All may now be good with the design in it’s current form, but you never know
When a large number of units are in the field, under a variety of conditions, over extended time, are none ever going to fail?
And if that does happen - apart from the immediate effects - what responsibility will the company take?
Will the company still be in business?

So choices and potential consequences


John
 

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muxo

Member
Yes, I also came across several related articles with respect to the system's 'failure's', of which most of them seem now isolated. The current product is on revision 4, which to me indicates that the company has stabilized the product and fine-tuned their engineering through user testing and feedback. For my use case, I'm looking at binoculars that weigh no more than 700 grams, well below the stated weight limits of the leash. It makes me confident that photographers with equipment that often weight much more than a binocular setup have been using these.

In any case, I think I'm going to test it out. One issue is where I will mount the eye covers? I haven't figured that out yet.
 
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fazalmajid

Well-known member
I have the Peak Design anchors for my cameras, along with their Leash, Slide, Cuff and Clutch straps. The QR fittings are relatively bulky compared to standard nylon snap-lock buckles, but more pleasant to use. The problems with the previous disks was the cord would wear, that's supposed to be fixed in version 3, and furthermore they added a wear indicator, the inner thread is white or yellow so if you see it in the otherwise black cord, you know to replace them.

They also have the Capture belt clip system (you can also mount it onto backpack straps), which is very secure, and used to have a 1/4"-20 thread mount attachment that some binoculars like the Nikon MHG have threads for on their hinges, but that seems to be discontinued.
 

BryanP

Well-known member
Hi all,
I’ve been using the latest Peak design quick release kit for my binos and cameras for awhile now. I find them functional but at times a little awkward to operate along with being a bit on the bulky side. On the plus side they’re well made and are smooth so tend not to snag things.

I was also using the Peak Capture on a belt to carry my Sony RX-10 Mkiv camera. The Peak Capture is fine, the Sony not so much. There’s a lots of point loading around the tripod socket when walking with the Peak Capture so I would recommend folks keep an eye on potential material flex in that area.
Because of the cracking and flexing around the tripod socket I’ve stopped using the Peak Capture and only use the Peak camera strap and quick releases. I do love the Peak camera strap which is well made and comfortable.
At some point I’ll probably switch back to an Op-tek quick release system which has a smaller presence and which I personally find easier to operate, its not as sexy as the Peak kit but thats ok.
Cheers,
Bryan
 

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seawatcher

Well-known member
Hello,


I've been looking at straps to replace the stock ones that came with my Nikon MHG's.

One issue with straps is being able to quickly remove them so I can mount the bins on a tripod without the strap getting in the way.

It looks like quick-releases are quite popular for this use-case and Maven sells such quick release strap systems.

I came across this alternative design:
https://www.peakdesign.com/products/leash
It's the Peak Design leash. Instead of quick locks it uses a clever snap system, which is interchangeable with other straps. Peak design looks to sell many products aimed at the photographer community, so I don't think many birders are aware of their offerings. I'm thinking of plunging in and testing them out.
I'm curious, has anyone else used these? Would there be any disadvantages to this system vs a traditional quick release system, e.g.: https://mavenbuilt.com/products/bin...57639110&pr_ref_pid=7458488518&pr_seq=uniform
You can also buy the Peak Design quick release clips in pairs to use on the strap of your choice. I use Peak Design sling-type straps for all my camera gear. The company claim they can support a weight of 90 kg. I much prefer these to standard clips found on many straps. Some of the gear I regularly use weighs 4 kilos and I have used the clips without any problems at all. They are quick and easy to use. I was obviously unsure as to whether the cords attached to the round bits were strong enough, but the claim about their durability appears to be true.
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
Hi Bryan (post #6),

I’m always surprised at the popularity of systems that suspend a camera - often with a heavy lens - from the tripod socket
It results in various shearing and crushing forces on the socket and it’s support, especially as the camera moves and stops (and often swings)
along with the walking user

Camera tripod sockets are rarely an integral part of the main chassis. They are mostly attached to a removable sub-assembly
For photos of examples, search under ‘teardown’ at the Lens Rentals site: https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/
And of course on the Leica M series, the socket is attached to the detachable base plate


And a warning for some:
Lens Rentals has teardowns of various cameras and lenses
Despite the impression of solidity given by their external shells, the innards are often a totally different matter
You may come away with a far different understanding of the robustness of your gear!


John
 
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BryanP

Well-known member
Hi John post 8

Huge fan of Roger Cicala.
There is an ongoing thread over on DP Review in the Sony forum on that very topic. It seems a few folks have had tripod socket failures with their RX-10 mk iv’s due to hanging them off the Peak Capture. This particular Sony model has the tripod socket right at the back edge of the camera so that coupled with everything you’ve pointed out is just damage waiting to happen.
Lesson learned, cleaned out the broken plastic and buttered the wound with a waterproof sealant and I’m good to go.
Some are claiming it has yet to be a problem with other camera brands and models but colour me suspicious.

I shudder to think what would happen if one were to hang a binocular off the Peak Capture by the traditional tripod mounts found on most brands.
Cheers,
Bryan
 

fazalmajid

Well-known member
I'd be interested if they sold the quick release connectors without the strap.
They do, and they’re on Black Friday sale at the moment:
 

Hermann

Well-known member
I also use the Peak system on all my camera gear. No problems at all. A friend has been using it on his Nikon D4s + f4 500mm lens for years with no problems. Of course you don't attach the anchors to the camera body, you attach it to the tripod collar of the lens to avoid stressing the bayonett mount of the camera with such a heavy combination. What you also need to do is to check the anchor links from time to time and replace them once they become worn. But you need to do that with ANY strap.

The capture clip ... Well, I've been using it for quite some time with my Nikons. Not with heavy lenses that weigh more than the camera body. No problems so far. I actually have capture clips attached to the straps of my two most used backpacks. I don't use them all that often though, often a sling strap is more convenient and faster on the draw.

For my binoculars I prefer traditional camera straps.

Hermann
 

PeterPS

MEMBER
The Peak connectors are visibly bigger than, for instance, the OpTech QR connectors. I have been using the latter for some of my binos without any problem. The Peak system looks more high-tech but does it really have any advantage compare to the smaller and lighter Op-Tech one? Perhaps the Peak connectors are safer to use on very heavy cameras.
 

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