• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Phasianidae (1 Viewer)

G. Sangster, S.M.S. Gregory & E.C. Dickinson, 2023 (October 25): 1. Ithaginini, a new family‐group name for the Blood Pheasant Ithaginis cruentus and resurrection of Lerwini for the Snow Partridge Lerwa lerwa (Phasianidae). Pp. 1-7.

https://www.aviansystematics.org/uploads/texteditor/AS_2_1_PDFA.pdf

A family-group name for Ithaginis was already available as :

Ithagininae Des Murs 1886
Oeillet Des Murs MAP. 1887. Musée ornithologique illustré : description des oiseaux d'Europe, de leurs oeufs et de leurs nids. Tome quatrième. Les oiseaux de proie ou rapaces. J Rothschild, Paris.
p. 175 : v.4 - Musée ornithologique illustré - Biodiversity Heritage Library

(This was proposed for a family. Des Murs, like several other French writers of his time, used -inae endings for families and -idae endings for "tribes", which he ranked above family.)
(The title page of the volume is dated “1887”, but volumes 3 and 4 of this work were reported as having been published in Nov 1886 in Catal. Mens. Libr. Française Catalogue mensuel de la librairie française , and were noted as published in Bibliogr. France on 11 Dec 1886 Bibliographie de la France . Thus I date the name to 1886.)
 
Last edited:
Here is Wolters 1976:
U'fam. Ithagininae - Blutfasanen
Genus lthaginis Wagl., 1832
Phasianidae
lthaginis cruentus (Hardw., 1822) - Blutfosan;
E: Blood-Pheasant. - Himalaya und Tibet
bis Kansu, Honan, Yunnan und NE-Burma.
Subsp. (incl. tibetanus, kuseri, geoffroyi, berezowskii,
sinensis).
At the end of the book is a list of names Wolters considered as new. Ithagininae is not on the list likely because of Des Murs 1886. Article 13 is about new names after 1930.
 
Catalina Palacios, Pengcheng Wang, Nan Wang, Megan A Brown, Lukas Capatosto, Juan Du, Jiahu Jiang, Qingze Zhang, Nishma Dahal, and Sangeet Lamichhaney (2023) Genomic variation, population history, and long-term genetic adaptation to high altitudes in Tibetan Partridge (Perdix hodgsoniae). Molecular Biology and Evolution 40: msad214. Genomic Variation, Population History, and Long-Term Genetic Adaptation to High Altitudes in Tibetan Partridge (Perdix hodgsoniae)

Abstract
Species residing across elevational gradients display adaptations in response to environmental changes such as oxygen availability, ultraviolet radiation, and temperature. Here, we study genomic variation, gene expression, and long-term adaptation in Tibetan Partridge (Perdix hodgsoniae) populations residing across the elevational gradient of the Tibetan Plateau. We generated a high-quality draft genome and used it to carry out downstream population genomic and transcriptomic analysis. The P. hodgsoniae populations residing across various elevations were genetically distinct, and their phylogenetic clustering was consistent with their geographic distribution. We identified possible evidence of gene flow between populations residing in <3,000 and >4,200 m elevation that is consistent with known habitat expansion of high-altitude populations of P. hodgsoniae to a lower elevation. We identified a 60 kb haplotype encompassing the Estrogen Receptor 1 (ESR1) gene, showing strong genetic divergence between populations of P. hodgsoniae. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ESR1 gene fixed for derived alleles in high-altitude populations that are strongly conserved across vertebrates. We also compared blood transcriptome profiles and identified differentially expressed genes (such as GAPDH, LDHA, and ALDOC) that correlated with differences in altitude among populations of P. hodgsoniae. These candidate genes from population genomics and transcriptomics analysis were enriched for neutrophil degranulation and glycolysis pathways, which are known to respond to hypoxia and hence may contribute to long-term adaptation to high altitudes in P. hodgsoniae. Our results highlight Tibetan Partridges as a useful model to study molecular mechanisms underlying long-term adaptation to high altitudes.
 
Sorry to bother here with a question about Lophura diardi (Bonaparte, 1856) OD t.43 (1856) - Comptes rendus hebdomadaires des séances de l'Académie des sciences - Biodiversity Heritage Library There is written:

En effet, le beau Faisan que Temminck avaiat voulu lui dédier sous le nom des Phasianus diardii, n'est autre que le Ph. versicolor, Vieill.
We can find the name here v.5 (1838) - Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d'oiseaux - Biodiversity Heritage Library

Than Bonaparte wrote:
La couleur violette qui prédomine, ou du moins saute aux yeux les moins exercés, et la préférence dont est digne ce nouvel Euplocomus diardi, Temm., nous l'a fait dénommer Diardigallus prelatus.

1) Has Temminck ever published this name Euplocomus diardi for Diard's Fireback?
2) Is the name not somehow pre-occupied by Phasianus diardii?
3) Why not Lophura prelatus as that seems the name Bonaparte intended for the Diard's Fireback?
 
1) Has Temminck ever published this name Euplocomus diardi for Diard's Fireback?
2) Is the name not somehow pre-occupied by Phasianus diardii?
3) Why not Lophura prelatus as that seems the name Bonaparte intended for the Diard's Fireback?

Bonaparte's wording here was pretty much obscure in my opinion, and I'm very unclear that it has usually been understood correctly...

3. Diardigallus, Bp. Nul voyageur ne méritait mieux que M. Diard l'honneur de donner son nom à une espèce nouvelle, et on ne sait quelle maladresse a toujours empêché qu'on ne lui rendît cette justice. En effet, le beau Faisan que Temminck avait voulu lui dédier sous le nom de Phasianus diardi, n'est autre que le Ph. versicolor, Vieill. L'Alectrophasis que M. Guérin a figuré sous son nom, ne diffère pas du cuvieri!... et, récemment, on aurait voulu appeler, d'après lui, le véritable Acomus (¹) erythrophthalmus, Raffles, ou pyronotus, Vieill. (²).
» Espérons qu'enfin son nom pourra rester, et, qui plus est, comme générique, au magnifique Gallinacé auquel nous l'imposons avec la pleine approbation de MM. Temminck et Schlegel. Il se trouve reproduit parmi les admirables petites figures que Schlegel a préparées pour son Manuel de Zoologie à l'usage de la glorieuse marine hollandaise. En effet, cet oiseau n'est pas moins remarquable par ses formes que par le brillant de son plumage. C'est, pour ainsi dire (même par la queue), un véritable Coq sans pendeloques. Ce genre devra donc suivre immédiatement Gallus, et dans notre Tableau il devrait se trouver sous le n° 39, comme Diardigallus, au bas de la colonne des Coqs, plutôt même que de commencer celle des Gallophasis.
» La couleur violette qui prédomine, ou du moins saute aux yeux les moins exercés, et la préférence dont est digne ce nouvel Euplocomus diardi, Temm., nous l'a fait dénommer Diardigallus prelatus. [...] »

3. Diardigallus, Bp. No traveller better deserved the honour of giving his name to a new species than Mr. Diard, and no one knows which clumsiness always prevented this justice from being done to him. Indeed, the beautiful Pheasant which Temminck had wanted to dedicate to him under the name Phasianus diardi, is no other than Ph. versicolor, Vieill. The Alectrophasis which Mr. Guérin figured under his name, does not differ from the cuvieri!... and, recently, one would have wished to name after him, the true Acomus (¹) erythrophthalmus, Raffles, or pyronotus, Vieill. (²).​
» Let's hope that finally his name will be allowed to stand, and, what is more, as a generic name, for the magnificent fowl to which we impose it with the full approval of Messrs. Temminck and Schlegel. It is represented among the admirable little figures which Schlegel has prepared for his Manual of Zoology for the use of the glorious Dutch navy. Indeed, this bird is no less remarkable for its shapes than for the brightness of its plumage. It is, so to speak (even by the tail), a real fowl without pendants. This genus must therefore immediately follow Gallus, and in our Table it should stand under number 39, as Diardigallus, at the bottom of the column of the fowls, rather, even, than at the start of that of Gallophasis.​
» The purple colour which predominates, or at least springs to the less trained eyes, and the preference which this new Euplocomus diardi, Temm., deserves, has made us call it Diardigallus prelatus. [...then follows a precise description of the species...] »​

In the above, Bonaparte is usually interpreted as having proposed Diardigallus prelatus in "replacement" of a manuscript name "Euplocomus diardi, Temm." Is this really what the text is telling us, however...?
Schlegel's "little figures" which Bonaparte says show the bird were published in 1857, and are here. In the corresponding text, Schegel called the bird Gallus diardii.
The "Table" to which Bonaparte referred in the description, and where he would have made Diardigallus stand as #39, is this -- which had been published a couple of months earlier.
Now... I can but note that, in this slightly earlier Table, we have :
  1. a "diardi, Temm." in the synonymy of Phasianus versicolor Vieill.,
  2. a "diardi, Guérin" in the synonymy of Alectrophasis cuvieri Temm., and
  3. an "E. diardi, Temm." in the synonymy of Acomus erythrophthalmus Raffl.
...which appears to match Bonaparte's statements in the description that :
  1. the beautiful Pheasant which Temminck had wanted to dedicate to him under the name Phasianus diardi, is no other than Ph. versicolor, Vieill.,
  2. the Alectrophasis which Mr. Guérin figured under his name, does not differ from the cuvieri, and,
  3. recently, one would have wished to name after him, the true Acomus erythrophthalmus, Raffles.
As a consequence, I would be inclined to read the phrase "ce nouvel Euplocomus diardi, Temm.", in the description, as an oblique way to present Diardigallus prelatus as another attempt to name a species after Diard -- just like "Euplocomus diardi, Temm." could have been one, had it not been intended for the bird already named erythrophthalmus Raffles... IOW, I am completely unconvinced that "Euplocomus diardi, Temm.", in Bonaparte's description of Diardigallus prelatus, was ever intended to apply to the bird that was being described.
 
Last edited:
One that I think has slipped through the net:

Lu, Q., Wang, P., Chang, J., Chen, D., Gao, S., Höglund, J., & Zhang, Z. (2024). Population genomic data reveal low genetic diversity, divergence and local adaptation among threatened Reeves's Pheasant (Syrmaticus reevesii). Avian Research, 15, 100156. Redirecting

Population genomic data could provide valuable information for conservation efforts; however, limited studies have been conducted to investigate the genetic status of threatened pheasants. Reeves's Pheasant (Syrmaticus reevesii) is facing population decline, attributed to increases in habitat loss. There is a knowledge gap in understanding the genomic status and genetic basis underlying the local adaptation of this threatened bird. Here, we used population genomic data to assess population structure, genetic diversity, inbreeding patterns, and genetic divergence. Furthermore, we identified candidate genes linked with adaptation across the current distribution of Reeves's Pheasant. The present study assembled the first de novo genome sequence of Reeves's Pheasant and annotated 19,458 genes. We also sequenced 30 individuals from three populations (Dabie Mountain, Shennongjia, Qinling Mountain) and found that there was clear population structure among those populations. By comparing with other threatened species, we found that Reeves's Pheasants have low genetic diversity. Runs of homozygosity suggest that the Shennongjia population has experienced serious inbreeding. The demographic history results indicated that three populations experienced several declines during the glacial period. Local adaptative analysis among the populations identified 241 candidate genes under directional selection. They are involved in a large variety of processes, including the immune response and pigmentation. Our results suggest that the three populations should be considered as three different conservation units. The current study provides genetic evidence for conserving the threatened Reeves's Pheasant and provides genomic resources for global biodiversity management.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top