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Picidae (1 Viewer)

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
I just wanted to make sure I read the text correctly because post 169 contained the proposal to "tentatively treat as subspecies".

Niels
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Picus rafflesii

Guy M. Kirwan, Nigel J. Collar. Picus Rafflesii Vigors, 1830, re-assigned to Chloropicoides Malherbe, 1849. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 140(2):147-150 (2020). https://doi.org/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a5

Abstract:

A recent comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the Picidae recovered the genus Dinopium as paraphyletic, with Olive-backed Woodpecker D. rafflesii sister to Pale-headed Woodpecker Gecinulus grantia. Of the available taxonomic responses, we favour assigning D. rafflesii to its own genus, in line with the modern trend to recognise more and smaller genera. Several genus names were used for rafflesii between the mid-19th and early 20th centuries, of which Chloropicoides Malherbe, 1849, is the oldest. Available information suggests, however, that it was not Malherbe's intention to designate rafflesii as the type of his new genus, but that in near-simultaneously publishing two works on the Picidae he inadvertently introduced Chloropicoides first in combination solely with rafflesii, making it the type species by monotypy. Should it be proven that his other, more detailed paper was in fact published first, then another Malherbe genus, Gauropicoides, could be used by those who seek to recognise the distinctiveness of rafflesii.

[full article]
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Jynx torquilla

Chao Du, Li Liu, Yunpeng Liu, and Zhaohui Fu. 2020. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Eurasian wryneck Jynx torquilla (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae) and its phylogenetic inference. Zootaxa 4810: 351-360.
https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4810.2.8

Abstract:

The Eurasian Wryneck is a species of wryneck woodpecker breeding in temperate regions of Europe and Asia. We sequenced the mitochondrial genome of Jynx torquilla (Aves, Piciformes, Picidae) using the next generation sequencing. The circular genome is 16,832 bp long, encoding 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), two ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), and two control regions. Gene order and orientation are similar to the most common type suggested as ancestral for birds but have a 1,221 bp control region and a 60 bp remnant control region. Phylogenetic analyses of 17 piciform taxa, based on both nucleotide and amino acid sequences of mitochondrial PCGs, strongly support the monophyly of Picidae. All phylogenetic trees indicate that the subfamily Jynginae is a monophyletic lineage sister to other woodpeckers, including monophyletic Picinae. Only the Bayes inferred tree based on the nucleotide dataset, recovered Picumninae as monophyletic. These findings will be helpful for the understanding of the phylogeny and evolution of Picidae.
 

Argentavis

New member
Yaroslav A. Red’kin, Diana R. Zhigir (2020). Northern subspecies of the Japanese Pygmy Woodpecker Yungipicus kizuki (Temminck, 1836). Russian Journal of Ornithology 29 (1961): 3699-3718

In total 149 specimens from northern parts of breeding range were processed. We recognize the reality of the four northern geographic races of the Japanese Pygmy Woodpecker:
Yungipicus kizuki permutatus (Meise, 1934)
Yungipicus kizuki seebohmi (Hargitt, 1884)
Yungipicus kizuki ijimae (Taka-Tsukasa, 1922)
Yungipicus kizuki kurodae Bergman, 1931

Link to download the full number with paper: https://ornis.su/downloads/category/28-2020.html?download=1967:2020-1961&start=80
 
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Norbert R.

Active member
Is someone able to confirm that the Russian Ornithological Journal publishes a printed version? If it is published online only, the new taxa described are not validly introduced, as they need a ZooBank registration.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Jérôme Fuchs, Rauri C.K. Bowie, Martim Melo, Giovanni Boano, Marco Pavia, Jon Fjeldså.
Phylogeographic history of the Olive Woodpecker Dendropicos griseocephalus a species widely distributed across Africa.

Abstract
Few studies have quantified the extent of genetic differentiation within widely distributed polytypic African bird species with disjunct ranges. Current knowledge indicates that high levels of genetic differentiation are found for such lineages but generalisation of the pattern requires further comparisons with other co‐distributed taxa. We assessed the extent of phylogeographic structure across the range of the Olive Woodpecker Dendropicos griseocephalus using mitochondrial and nuclear intron data. The Olive Woodpecker occupies the forests of central (Dendropicos griseocephalus ruwenzori) and eastern (Dendropicos g. kilimensis) Africa, with a disjunct morphological lineage (Dendropicos g. griseocephalus) occurring in southern Africa. Each of the subspecies lineages can be diagnosed using morphology. Phylogenetic analyses of our sequence data recovered three monophyletic lineages with kilimensis sister to ruwenzori, and griseocephalus as sister to the clade uniting these two taxa. Molecular species delimitation methods and estimates of gene flow under the isolation‐with‐migration model suggest that the clade uniting the central and eastern subspecies may be recognized as distinct at the species level from the nominate subspecies, restricted to southern Africa. We conclude that D. griseocephalus (Boddaert, 1783) and D. ruwenzori (Sharpe, 1902) (including subspecies kilimensis) should be considered full species. The biogeographic pattern we uncover for the Olive Woodpecker differs from that of other co‐distributed widespread species both in terms of the order of sequence divergence of lineages occupying different areas of endemism in Africa, and in the timing of divergence, being younger (0.5‐0.7 mya BP) than that recovered for the co‐distributed Square‐tailed Drongo Dicrurus ludwigii (0.9‐1.6 mya BP).

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ibi.12875

Dendropicos griseocephalus ruwenzori (Sharpe, 1902) is raised at species level as Dendropicos ruwenzori (including subspecies kilimensis)
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Is someone able to confirm that the Russian Ornithological Journal publishes a printed version? If it is published online only, the new taxa described are not validly introduced, as they need a ZooBank registration.
I'd assume they print out a few copies of their pdfs and mail them out to major libraries to satisfy the Code. Presumably if they didn't, the libraries could do so off their own bat?
 

l_raty

laurent raty
I'd assume they print out a few copies of their pdfs and mail them out to major libraries to satisfy the Code. Presumably if they didn't, the libraries could do so off their own bat?
I'd not read the Code as being easily satisfied with a few printed copies mailed out to major libraries.
To be published in print, the printed work must "be obtainable, when first issued, free of charge or by purchase". This means that the public (you, me -- not just a few 'major libraries') should have been offered the possibility to acquire a copy of the work at the moment it was published. It may be argued that copies lodged in a library are thereby, ultimately, made viewable by the public, but (1) "viewable" is not exactly the same thing as "obtainable" and (2) even if these two things are deemed equivalent, this would still not make the lodged work "obtainable" "when first issued", but at some later point.
Registering an online work with ZooBank seems much easier to me than printing copies in an attempt to meet the requirements for physical publication -- unless you intend to do "the real thing".
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Not sure how it is with ICZN, but that's how botanical e-publishing works, you have to send paper copies to selected libraries (a minimum of 10 rings a faint bell, but don't quote me on that!) and also have a few copies available for mail order. The vast majority of people just want the pdf of course; they can print it out themselves if they really want to.
 

l_raty

laurent raty
ICZN treats online and print as wholly independent publication pathways, which do not complement each other.
If you publish online, the published object is an electronic file. A "copy" of the work is then a copy of this file: "paper copies" produced in addition to the online publication are not technically regarded as "copies" of the online work. These "paper copies" may become a printed work, but this requires that they satisfy the requirements for print publication on their own, just as if no parallel online publication process existed.
 
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Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Jean-Marc Pons, David Campion, Giorgio Chiozzi, Antonia Ettwein, Jean-Louis Grangé, Lukasz Kajtoch, Tomasz D. Mazgajski, Marko Rakovic, Hans Winkler & Jérome Fuchs (2020) Phylogeography of a widespread Palearctic forest bird species: The White-backed Woodpecker (Aves, Picidae).


Abstract
We use multilocus molecular data and species distribution modelling to investigate the phylogenetics and the phylogeography of the White‐backed Woodpecker (Dendrocopos leucotos), a bird species widely distributed over the entire Palaearctic. Our phylogenetic results reveal three well‐supported clades within D. leucotos: the Chinese endemic subspecies (tangi, insularis), the northerly distributed subspecies (leucotos, uralensis) and the four poorly genetically differentiated Japanese subspecies (subcirris, stejnegeri, namiyei, owstoni), and the south‐western Palaearctic lilfordi subspecies. According to our results, the Amami Woodpecker, endemic to Amami Oshima Island (Ryukyu archipelago, Japan) sometimes treated as full species Dendrocopos owstoni, does not deserve a species‐level status. Based on the mitochondrial phylogeographic results, the Japanese archipelago was recently colonized only once by D. leucotos from eastern Eurasia. Our results suggest a split between the leucotos and lilfordi lineages that dates back to mid‐Pleistocene (around 0.6 Mya) with likely no gene flow between these two subspecies since then. Our results thus do not support a phylogeographic pattern in which Central Europe and Northern Europe were recolonized from one or several southern glacial refugia where lilfordi populations persisted through several Pleistocene glacial periods. Spatial variation in mitochondrial diversity across leucotos/uralensis populations and niche ecological modelling suggest a possible eastward population expansion from a unique glacial refugium likely located in Central Europe. Molecular species delimitation methods, gene flow analyses and differences in adult and juvenile plumage indicate that the lilfordi subspecies may warrant to be ranked as a valid phylogenetic species. Further studies are nevertheless needed in the Balkans, where leucotos and lilfordi came recently into contact to measure the effectiveness of reproductive barriers and gene flow.
 

jurek

Well-known member
Further studies are nevertheless needed in the Balkans, where leucotos and lilfordi came recently into contact to measure the effectiveness of reproductive barriers and gene flow.

I thought that the white-backed woodpecker in Europe is a classic species recently reduced to isolated populations by intensive exploitation of forests, and the ranges of leucotos and lilfordi were continuous until ca 100-200 years ago. There should even be old museum specimens dating from before that time.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Here the full paper, just sent by Pons himself
 

Attachments

  • Pons et al. 2020, Phylogeography, White-backed Woodpecker.pdf
    1.3 MB · Views: 34

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
So if the Japanese populations were split, what would be the new species name? The oldest described two described subspecies for Japan were both described by Stejneger in 1866 (D.l. subcirris and D.l. namiyei) according to Wikipedia.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
So if the Japanese populations were split, what would be the new species name? The oldest described two described subspecies for Japan were both described by Stejneger in 1866 (D.l. subcirris and D.l. namiyei) according to Wikipedia.
Not sure that the Japanese pops are raised to species rank. Only the lilfordi and insularis clades should be elevated
 

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