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Pipridae (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Antilophia

Luna, L. W., Souza, T. O., Carneiro, L. S., de Girão e Silva, W. A., Schneider, H., Sampaio, I., Araripe, J. and Rêgo, P. S. d. (2017), Molecular data and distribution dynamics indicate a recent and incomplete separation of manakins species of the genus Antilophia (Aves: Pipridae) in response to Holocene climate change. J Avian Biol. doi:10.1111/jav.01378

Abstract:

To determine a hypothetical scenario that accounts for the diversification of the two species of the genus Antilophia, we conducted multilocus molecular comparisons and species distribution modeling for the two taxa, which have distinct male plumage coloration patterns and allopatric geographic distributions, despite the high degree of genetic similarity indicated by recent studies. Three mitochondrial and three nuclear fragments were analyzed. The results indicate clear differences in the genetic diversity of the two species, but with ample sharing of haplotypes in all the markers analyzed, reflecting the absence of reciprocal monophyly, presumably due to the relatively recent and still incomplete separation of the two species. The paleoclimatic distribution models, together with the observed genetic profile indicate a recent process of divergence by geographic isolation in the ancestral populations of the two species. This scenario coincides with the recent climatic events of the South American dry diagonal, which involves the gallery forests of the Cerrado biome and the cloud forest enclaves of the seasonal tropical dry forest of the Caatinga between the late Pleistocene and the mid Holocene.
 

Melanie

Well-known member
A new species of manakin (Aves: Pipridae; Machaeropterus) from Peru with a taxonomic reassessment of the Striped Manakin (M. regulus) complex
DANIEL F. LANE, ANDREW W. KRATTER, JOHN P. O’NEILL

Abstract

We describe a new taxon of manakin in the Machaeropterus regulus complex, from the foothills of southwestern Loreto and northern San Martín departments, Peru. This new form appears to be almost identical morphologically to the Tepui form M. regulus aureopectus but differs strongly from that and all other members of the M. regulus complex in voice. Therefore, we conclude that this population represents a new biological species that we here name Machaeropterus eckelberryi. Based on voice and some morphological characters, we concur with several previous authors (e.g., Whittaker & Oren 1999; Snow 2004; Ridgely & Tudor 2009) that nominate M. regulus (Eastern Striped Manakin), of the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, should be separated as a biological species from the polytypic Machaeropterus striolatus of western South America (Western Striped Manakin), including M. s. striolatus of Amazonia, M. r. obscurostriatus and M. r. zulianus of the Venezuelan Andes, M. r. antioquiae of the Colombian Andes, and M. r. aureopectus of the tepuis region.

Machaeropterus eckelberryi sp. nov.

www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4320.2.11
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
A new species of manakin (Aves: Pipridae; Machaeropterus) from Peru with a taxonomic reassessment of the Striped Manakin (M. regulus) complex
DANIEL F. LANE, ANDREW W. KRATTER, JOHN P. O’NEILL

Abstract

We describe a new taxon of manakin in the Machaeropterus regulus complex, from the foothills of southwestern Loreto and northern San Martín departments, Peru. This new form appears to be almost identical morphologically to the Tepui form M. regulus aureopectus but differs strongly from that and all other members of the M. regulus complex in voice. Therefore, we conclude that this population represents a new biological species that we here name Machaeropterus eckelberryi. Based on voice and some morphological characters, we concur with several previous authors (e.g., Whittaker & Oren 1999; Snow 2004; Ridgely & Tudor 2009) that nominate M. regulus (Eastern Striped Manakin), of the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, should be separated as a biological species from the polytypic Machaeropterus striolatus of western South America (Western Striped Manakin), including M. s. striolatus of Amazonia, M. r. obscurostriatus and M. r. zulianus of the Venezuelan Andes, M. r. antioquiae of the Colombian Andes, and M. r. aureopectus of the tepuis region.

Machaeropterus eckelberryi sp. nov.

www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4320.2.11

Awesome

Can we see a picture of it, please?
 

James Jobling

Well-known member
I assume named after Don R. Eckelberry, US bird artist (e.g. Audubon Western Bird Guide 1957; Guide to the Birds of Trinidad and Tobago 1973)?
 
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Taphrospilus

Well-known member
I assume named after Don R. Eckelberry, US bird artist (e.g. Audubon Western Bird Guide 1957; Guide to the Birds of Trinidad and Tobago 1973)?

If it was named after him a brief story about his life here in section Don Richard Eckelberry.


And as there is a reference to....

Angell, T. (2001) Don Richard Eckelberry (obituary). Ornitologia Neotropical, 12, 357–359.

....very likely.
 
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Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
A new species of manakin (Aves: Pipridae; Machaeropterus) from Peru with a taxonomic reassessment of the Striped Manakin (M. regulus) complex
DANIEL F. LANE, ANDREW W. KRATTER, JOHN P. O’NEILL

Abstract

We describe a new taxon of manakin in the Machaeropterus regulus complex, from the foothills of southwestern Loreto and northern San Martín departments, Peru. This new form appears to be almost identical morphologically to the Tepui form M. regulus aureopectus but differs strongly from that and all other members of the M. regulus complex in voice. Therefore, we conclude that this population represents a new biological species that we here name Machaeropterus eckelberryi. Based on voice and some morphological characters, we concur with several previous authors (e.g., Whittaker & Oren 1999; Snow 2004; Ridgely & Tudor 2009) that nominate M. regulus (Eastern Striped Manakin), of the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, should be separated as a biological species from the polytypic Machaeropterus striolatus of western South America (Western Striped Manakin), including M. s. striolatus of Amazonia, M. r. obscurostriatus and M. r. zulianus of the Venezuelan Andes, M. r. antioquiae of the Colombian Andes, and M. r. aureopectus of the tepuis region.

Machaeropterus eckelberryi sp. nov.

www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4320.2.11

for more information see here
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Antilophia

Luna, Souza, de Girão e Silva, Schneider, Sampaio, Araripe, Rêgo. 2017. Genetic variation of the endangered Araripe Manakin (Antilophia bokermanni) indicates a history of demographic decline. Rev. Bras. Ornitol. 25:60-66.
[pdf]
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
A new species of manakin (Aves: Pipridae; Machaeropterus) from Peru with a taxonomic reassessment of the Striped Manakin (M. regulus) complex
DANIEL F. LANE, ANDREW W. KRATTER, JOHN P. O’NEILL

Abstract

We describe a new taxon of manakin in the Machaeropterus regulus complex, from the foothills of southwestern Loreto and northern San Martín departments, Peru. This new form appears to be almost identical morphologically to the Tepui form M. regulus aureopectus but differs strongly from that and all other members of the M. regulus complex in voice. Therefore, we conclude that this population represents a new biological species that we here name Machaeropterus eckelberryi. Based on voice and some morphological characters, we concur with several previous authors (e.g., Whittaker & Oren 1999; Snow 2004; Ridgely & Tudor 2009) that nominate M. regulus (Eastern Striped Manakin), of the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, should be separated as a biological species from the polytypic Machaeropterus striolatus of western South America (Western Striped Manakin), including M. s. striolatus of Amazonia, M. r. obscurostriatus and M. r. zulianus of the Venezuelan Andes, M. r. antioquiae of the Colombian Andes, and M. r. aureopectus of the tepuis region.

Machaeropterus eckelberryi sp. nov.

www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4320.2.11

Proposal (761) to SACC

Change species limits within Machaeropterus regulus
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Lepidothrix vilasboasi

Barrera-Guzmán, Alexandre, Shawkey, Weir. 2017. Hybrid speciation leads to novel male secondary sexual ornamentation of an Amazonian bird. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (early edition).
[abstract & supp.inf.]

Hybrid speciation is rare in vertebrates, and reproductive isolation arising from hybridization is infrequently demonstrated. Here, we present evidence supporting a hybrid-speciation event involving the genetic admixture of the snow-capped (Lepidothrix nattereri) and opal-crowned (Lepidothrix iris) manakins of the Amazon basin, leading to the formation of the hybrid species, the golden-crowned manakin (Lepidothrix vilasboasi). We used a genome-wide SNP dataset together with analysis of admixture, population structure, and coalescent modeling to demonstrate that the golden-crowned manakin is genetically an admixture of these species and does not represent a hybrid zone but instead formed through ancient genetic admixture. We used spectrophotometry to quantify the coloration of the species-specific male crown patches. Crown patches are highly reflective white (snow-capped manakin) or iridescent whitish-blue to pink (opal-crowned manakin) in parental species but are a much less reflective yellow in the hybrid species. The brilliant coloration of the parental species results from nanostructural organization of the keratin matrix feather barbs of the crown. However, using electron microscopy, we demonstrate that the structural organization of this matrix is different in the two parental species and that the hybrid species is intermediate. The intermediate nature of the crown barbs, resulting from past admixture appears to have rendered a duller structural coloration. To compensate for reduced brightness, selection apparently resulted in extensive thickening of the carotenoid-laden barb cortex, producing the yellow crown coloration. The evolution of this unique crown-color signal likely culminated in premating isolation of the hybrid species from both parental species.

hybrid speciation | structural color | ornamentation | Amazon | Lepidothrix vilasboasi


See also the links provided [here]. As well as [here].
 
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Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Machaeropterus eckelberryi

A new species of manakin (Aves: Pipridae; Machaeropterus) from Peru with a taxonomic reassessment of the Striped Manakin (M. regulus) complex
DANIEL F. LANE, ANDREW W. KRATTER, JOHN P. O’NEILL

Abstract

We describe a new taxon of manakin in the Machaeropterus regulus complex, from the foothills of southwestern Loreto and northern San Martín departments, Peru. This new form appears to be almost identical morphologically to the Tepui form M. regulus aureopectus but differs strongly from that and all other members of the M. regulus complex in voice. Therefore, we conclude that this population represents a new biological species that we here name Machaeropterus eckelberryi. Based on voice and some morphological characters, we concur with several previous authors (e.g., Whittaker & Oren 1999; Snow 2004; Ridgely & Tudor 2009) that nominate M. regulus (Eastern Striped Manakin), of the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, should be separated as a biological species from the polytypic Machaeropterus striolatus of western South America (Western Striped Manakin), including M. s. striolatus of Amazonia, M. r. obscurostriatus and M. r. zulianus of the Venezuelan Andes, M. r. antioquiae of the Colombian Andes, and M. r. aureopectus of the tepuis region.

Machaeropterus eckelberryi sp. nov.

www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4320.2.11

IOC Updates Diary Apr 7

Accept ‘Peruvian’ Striped Manakin; English name provisional
 

mb1848

Well-known member
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Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
TiF Update April 8

Striped Manakins: Based on Lane et al. (2017), the Striped Manakin, Machaeropterus regulus, has been split into

Striolated Manakin / Western Striped-Manakin, Machaeropterus striolatus
Painted Manakin / Peruvian Striped-Manakin, Machaeropterus eckelberryi
Kinglet Manakin / Eastern Striped-Manakin, Machaeropterus regulus
[Pipridae, Tyrannida I, 3.03]
 
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Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Lepidothrix

Cleyssian Dias, Keila de Araújo Lima, Juliana Araripe, Alexandre Aleixo, Marcelo Vallinoto, Iracilda Sampaio, Horacio Schneider, Péricles Sena do Rêgo. Mitochondrial introgression obscures phylogenetic relationships among Manakins of the genus Lepidothrix (Aves: Pipridae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Available online 12 April 2018.

Abstract:

Lepidothrix is the most diverse genus of the family Pipridae, with eight recognized species. Although the genus' monophyly has been supported by both molecular and morphological characters, phylogenetic relationships and species limits within Lepidothrix remain uncertain. In the present study, we combined molecular sequences of mitochondrial (ND2 and COI) and nuclear (MYO, G3PDh and I5BF) markers in a multilocus analysis, to evaluate relationships and inter-specific limits among L. iris, L. nattereri, and L. vilasboasi, which are known to hybridize in eastern Amazonia. The results revealed a complex pattern, whereby events of secondary contact and gene flow after isolation and genetic and phenotypic differentiation prevented the recuperation of reciprocal monophyly among the studied taxa. The mitochondrial data indicate that L. nattereri is divided into two non-sister groups, one monophyletic, and the other, paraphyletic, with L. iris iris being more closely related to one of the two L. nattereri groups, while L. iris eucephala forms an undifferentiated clade with L. vilasboasi, probably resulting from an extensive process of mitochondrial introgression. In agreement with a previous study based on Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data, mitochondrial haplotype networks also support that L. vilasboasi does not represent a recent “hybrid swarm” between L. iris and L. nattereri, but instead a genetically divergent lineage with a separate species status. Finally, the sister relationship recovered herein between L. iris iris and some western populations of L. nattereri currently in allopatry is also apparently explained by mitochondrial introgression, as also supported for nuclear genes by SNP data, indicating a complex scenario of past contact and gene flow between currently geographically distant Lepidothrix lineages.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
João Marcos Guimarães Capurucho, Mary V. Ashley, Camila C. Ribas, John M. Bates. Connecting Amazonian, Cerrado, and Atlantic Forest histories: Paraphyly, old divergences, and modern population dynamics in tyrant-manakins (Neopelma/Tyranneutes, Aves: Pipridae).
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 12 June 2018

Abstract :

Within lineage structure and recent demographic fluctuations are observed.
Abstract
Several biogeographic hypotheses have been proposed to explain connections between Amazonian and Atlantic forest biotas. These hypotheses are related to the timing of the connections and their geographic patterns. We performed a phylogeographic investigation of Tyrant-manakins (Aves: Pipridae, Neopelma/Tyranneutes) which include species inhabiting the Amazon and Atlantic forests, as well as gallery forests of the Cerrado. Using DNA sequence data, we determined phylogenetic relationships, temporal and geographic patterns of diversification, and recent intraspecific population genetic patterns, relative to the history of these biomes. We found Neopelma to be a paraphyletic genus, as N. chrysolophum is sister to Neopelma + Tyranneutes, with an estimated divergence of approximately 18 Myrs BP, within the oldest estimated divergence times of other Amazonian and Atlantic forest avian taxa. Subsequent divergences in the group occurred from Mid Miocene to Early Pliocene and involved mainly the Amazonian species, with an expansion into and subsequent speciation in the Cerrado gallery forests by N. pallescens. We found additional structure within N. chrysocephalum and N. sulphureiventer. Analysis of recent population dynamics in N. chrysocephalum, N. sulphureiventer, and N. pallescens revealed recent demographic fluctuations and restrictions to gene flow related to environmental changes since the last glacial cycle. No genetic structure was detected across the Amazon River in N. pallescens. The tyrant-manakins represent an old historical connection between the Amazon and Atlantic Forest.
 

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