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Pipridae (1 Viewer)

njlarsen

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Barbados
Lastly, we analyze variation in vocal phenotypes in the context of our phylogeny and propose that Pseudopipra is a species-complex composed of 15-17 distinct species which have arisen in the last ∼2.5 Ma.
So the authors of the paper on White-crowned Manakin Pseudopipra pipra mentions 15-17 possible species in the abstract but in their taxonomic recommendations are more conservative in recommending about eight if I understand correctly.

Niels
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
So the authors of the paper on White-crowned Manakin Pseudopipra pipra mentions 15-17 possible species in the abstract but in their taxonomic recommendations are more conservative in recommending about eight if I understand correctly.

Niels
Yes, they suggest that there are about fifteen or seventeen but recognize eight while waiting for the description of new species
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Christian C Morales, Juan P Gómez, and Juan L Parra. 2021. Patterns of morphological differentiation within Manacus manacus (Aves: Pipridae) in Colombia: revisiting hypotheses of isolation and secondary contact. Biological Journal of Linnean Society. Published: 25 September 2021
Patterns of morphological differentiation within Manacus manacus (Aves: Pipridae) in Colombia: revisiting hypotheses of isolation and secondary contact

Abstract
Determining the factors responsible for phenotypic variation within species is a fundamental task in evolutionary ecology. Isolation by distance, isolation by environment and clines along secondary contact zones between formerly isolated populations are common patterns of morphological variation. In this study, we evaluated whether patterns of morphological variation exhibit association with isolation by distance, isolation by environment or secondary contact in populations of Manacus manacus with contrasting plumage colour. We used field and museum measurements of five morphological characters from 311 individuals from 88 localities distributed across a highly heterogeneous environmental range within Colombia. Climatic variables explained a higher proportion of the variation than geographic distance among localities. We found differences in wing and culmen length between white and yellow phenotypes of M. manacus in Colombia. Overall morphology did not change in a clinal fashion in relation to the contact zone and the few traits that exhibit clinal variation suggest a distant locality for the contact zone, not in line with our expectations by secondary contact between differentiated populations, suggesting alternative mechanisms for differentiation between subspecies. Our results suggest that this species exhibits marked morphological variation associated with changes in temperature and precipitation. These associations are consistent throughout the geographic range analysed, leading us to postulate that dispersal and local adaptation jointly shape the distribution of phenotypic variation.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Kevin F P Bennett, Haw Chuan Lim, Michael J Braun, Sexual Selection and Introgression in Avian Hybrid Zones: Spotlight on Manacus, Integrative and Comparative Biology, Volume 61, Issue 4, October 2021, Pages 1291–1309, Sexual Selection and Introgression in Avian Hybrid Zones: Spotlight on Manacus

Abstract:

Hybrid zones offer a window into the processes and outcomes of evolution, from species formation or fusion to genomic underpinnings of specific traits and isolating mechanisms. Sexual selection is believed to be an important factor in speciation processes, and hybrid zones present special opportunities to probe its impact. The manakins (Aves, Pipridae) are a promising group in which to study the interplay of sexual selection and natural hybridization: they show substantial variation across the family in the strength of sexual selection they experience, they readily hybridize within and between genera, and they appear to have formed hybrid species, a rare event in birds. A hybrid zone between two manakins in the genus Manacus is unusual in that plumage and behavioral traits of one species have introgressed asymmetrically into populations of the second species through positive sexual selection, then apparently stalled at a river barrier. This is one of a handful of documented examples of asymmetric sexual trait introgression with a known selective mechanism. It offers opportunities to examine reproductive isolation, introgression, plumage color evolution, and natural factors enhancing or constraining the effects of sexual selection in real time. Here, we review previous work in this system, propose new hypotheses for observed patterns, and recommend approaches to test them.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
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