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Plans to return sea eagles to Isle of Wight (1 Viewer)

Alexjh1

Well-known member
Hi Mike,



Hehe, thanks for the perspective! :)

But I guess your local eagles probably hang out at the fringes of the densely populated area, don't they? At least, that's what the eagles here in Hamburg do (which has a nominal population density of 2400 per km^2, but includes a lot of rural area and even a couple of North Sea islands in its state boundaries).

Regards,

Henning

Obviously every species is different behaviourally, and so by no means an indication of how White-tailed would do, but White-bellied eagle at least seems VERY tolerant of humans. A few years ago had what seemed to be a family (two adults, two juveniles) in central Malacca, hanging out on a large aerial at points. In Feb I also saw them right in Marina Bay near downtown Singapore.

In terms of White-tailed, my impression is that they can become acclimatised to people? Certainly there are populations in densely populated areas (Netherlands) and ones which seem fairly relaxed in their interactions with human settlements (Hokkaido). The undisturbed nesting sites is certainly probably the crux point, as a bird living somewhere isn't the same as nesting somewhere.

As to "couldn't we spend that money on something else", that's always going to be a question with any conservation initiative, but given the difficulty in getting them funded, I'm generally of the opinion that "charismatic megafauna" initiatives, while potentially a money sink if managed badly, is useful in as much as it provides money/protection for habitats for other species in the process, and can function as functionally an ad campaign to raise revenue which can help elsewhere.

Side note: has there ever been any interest in trying to establish urban goshawk populations in the UK using city-adapted birds from elsewhere in Europe? Seems like in many ways a stable population in London would actually be better protected than one in a rural location by default?
 

jurek

Well-known member
In terms of White-tailed, my impression is that they can become acclimatised to people? Certainly there are populations in densely populated areas (Netherlands) and ones which seem fairly relaxed in their interactions with human settlements (Hokkaido). The undisturbed nesting sites is certainly probably the crux point, as a bird living somewhere isn't the same as nesting somewhere.

Not uncommon now in Poland and Germany. They keep their distance of people, but are regular on urban lakes and rvers in Hamburg, Warsaw etc.

They avoid people around the nest, but are OK with a small reserve or a wooded island on a lake, surrounded by agricultural area.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Obviously every species is different behaviourally, and so by no means an indication of how White-tailed would do, but White-bellied eagle at least seems VERY tolerant of humans. A few years ago had what seemed to be a family (two adults, two juveniles) in central Malacca, hanging out on a large aerial at points. In Feb I also saw them right in Marina Bay near downtown Singapore.

In terms of White-tailed, my impression is that they can become acclimatised to people? Certainly there are populations in densely populated areas (Netherlands) and ones which seem fairly relaxed in their interactions with human settlements (Hokkaido). The undisturbed nesting sites is certainly probably the crux point, as a bird living somewhere isn't the same as nesting somewhere.

As to "couldn't we spend that money on something else", that's always going to be a question with any conservation initiative, but given the difficulty in getting them funded, I'm generally of the opinion that "charismatic megafauna" initiatives, while potentially a money sink if managed badly, is useful in as much as it provides money/protection for habitats for other species in the process, and can function as functionally an ad campaign to raise revenue which can help elsewhere.

Side note: has there ever been any interest in trying to establish urban goshawk populations in the UK using city-adapted birds from elsewhere in Europe? Seems like in many ways a stable population in London would actually be better protected than one in a rural location by default?[/QUOTE]

No, probably because Peregrines are doing so well in Cities.
 

Alexjh1

Well-known member
That was my thinking, besides, very different nesting habitats. I'm not really surprised if it's not something that has been considered, as introducing specifically into a city would be a very atypical program, but the concept seemed a potentially interesting one at least?
 

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