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Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Premium (Alpha) vs Image stabilized (1 Viewer)

Charlie Yardbird

Active member
Antarctica
re the perception of stereopsis - could the IS be moving the focal point back & forth quickly, faster than the eye/brain can perceive, creating some sort of pseudo depth of field enhancement? To do with Persistance Of Vision?
 

cytherian

Well-known member
United States
No doubt the ergonomics are horrendous. I generally didn't like it the minute I picked it up. When your use to conventional roof bins, that fit the hand like a glove the L is hard to like. But they balance very well and if you can get passed the lousy hand fit and plastic feel, they really grow on you, and the glass is very sweet.
That's what put me off from exploring the Canon IS binocular range. I just don't like the ergonomics from looking at them, on top of what reviews I've read and watched (yes, I've not held them in my hands as yet). The price of a new pair (8x42, 10x42) is outside my budget so I'd want to pick up a used pair if possible. But I dropped them from consideration.

All in all, I think it comes down a lot to intended usage. From what I gather, these are pretty much ideal for use on a boat or other moving vehicle. The primary intention is to see something distant clearly, for necessity of navigation or other imperative versus casual recreational viewing. I can't see using them for astronomy when a tripod mount will do.

One other thing I didn't see or may have missed: reliability. Because of this very complex mechanism that is powered, how well does it hold up over time? And if something does go wrong, how expensive is it to be repaired by Canon? That's something that has always concerned me about IS technology.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
There is no Canon 8x42 IS binocular.

The Canon IS binoculars are ideal for astronomy.

They are also used at medium distances.

I think that rather few are used from small boats.

Personally, I wouldn't buy a used IS binocular unless the price is really low.

Reliability is reasonable, but they are more complex than non-IS binoculars.

Repair quality is mixed.

I have used various models for well over twenty years with few problems.

B.
 

cytherian

Well-known member
United States
There is no Canon 8x42 IS binocular.
The Canon IS binoculars are ideal for astronomy.
They are also used at medium distances.
I think that rather few are used from small boats.
Personally, I wouldn't buy a used IS binocular unless the price is really low.
Reliability is reasonable, but they are more complex than non-IS binoculars.
Repair quality is mixed.
I have used various models for well over twenty years with few problems.
Thank you for your response. Yes, you're right, there is a 10x42 but no 8x42 (seems they start at 10x and go up).
I can see if you don't have a rock-solid and steady tripod, or face windy conditions that the IS would work well for astronomy.
I mentioned boats and other moving vehicles as I'd seen testimony to that kind of use.
I presume that as long as the binoculars are not physically challenged at all, the mechanism should be fine. But it does make sense to avoid these on the used market unless guaranteed or from a very trusted source that verified function.
When you say repair quality is "mixed," can you elaborate? Thanks.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
My experience has been good.

The two 8x25s needed the front optical windows stuck back as they came away when repeatedly in a bag with various other items.
The gripping surface is very small.
Canon UK were very good here.

A used old 10x30 had moisture deposit internally. I shouldn't have bought it or should have returned it but didn't. Other than this it works O.K.

The 10x42L IS bought new had initial problems with the stabiliser.
I think it was stored in the shop upright.
I left it on a table flat and pressed the IS button every five minutes for an hour. I moved it slightly every five minutes to give the stabiliser work to do.
Since then it works well.

When the batteries are nearly flat some of the ISs becomes erratic.

The 12x36 IS from 1999 cannot be repaired because of lack of parts. Mine is fine.

Another 10x42L IS had problems with repairs after years of use.
Mine is fine.

There are 8x25 and 8x20 Canon IS binoculars.

Perhaps only the 10x42L IS is waterproof enough for heavy marine use.
For boats the Fujinons are preferred.

Regards,
B.
 

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