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Prunellidae (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Drovetski, S. V., Semenov, G., Drovetskaya, S. S., Fadeev, I. V., Red'kin, Y. A. and Voelker, G. (2013), Geographic mode of speciation in a mountain specialist Avian family endemic to the Palearctic. Ecology and Evolution. doi: 10.1002/ece3.539

Abstract and PDF (Open) here
 

Richard Klim

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Suggests that it might be reasonable to recognise Ural Black-throated Accentor Prunella (a) atrogularis and Turkestan Black-throated Accentor P (a) huttoni as distinct species.

Also, the divergence between Alpine Accentor sspp montana and erythropygia would seem to be consistent with a possible split into at least disjunct western P (c) collaris (incl subalpina, montana) and eastern P (c) nipalensis (all other sspp).

Hatchwell 2005 (HBW 10):
 
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lewis20126

Well-known member
Suggests that it might be reasonable to recognise Ural Black-throated Accentor Prunella (a) atrogularis and Turkestan Black-throated Accentor P (a) huttoni as distinct species.

Thanks Richard although a bit gruesome for those who have only seen BTA on the wintering grounds? :-C

cheers, alan
 

Richard Klim

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Black-throated Accentor

Thanks Richard although a bit gruesome for those who have only seen BTA on the wintering grounds? :-C
Thankfully I've seen huttoni on its breeding grounds in Kazakhstan, but I doubt that I'll ever make it to the Urals for atrogularis! Perhaps they're reliably diagnosable on the wintering grounds (eg, presence/absence of white gorget), but I suppose there's been little incentive to study wintering birds particularly closely...
 
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Xenospiza

Distracted
Supporter
Bit of a rushed conclusion to split them on such a small sample. And I've seen Black-throated in Kazakhstan too, so I should really support a split just to annoy Alan, haha.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
This little piece really looks like a little proofreading might have been in order. I assume "Japanese" in the Caption and "Tibetan" in the main text apply to the same populations, in which case some better choice of words/explanation would have been helpful.

Niels
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Rufous-breasted Accentor

Xiaonan Sun, Zhonglou Sun, Dingzhen Liu & Wenliang Zhou. Phylogenetic studies of Prunella strophiata (Passeridae: Prunella) based on complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. Mitochondrial DNA Part B: Resources, Volume 1, Issue 1 (pp 450-451), 2016.

[pdf]
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Xiaonan Sun, Zhonglou Sun, Dingzhen Liu & Wenliang Zhou. Phylogenetic studies of Prunella strophiata (Passeridae: Prunella) based on complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. Mitochondrial DNA Part B: Resources, Volume 1, Issue 1 (pp 450-451), 2016.

[pdf]

They should have reread their paper before publishing.
 
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dnsallen

Well-known member
'Rufous-breasted Accentor (Prunella strophiata) is a small-sized bunting with an extremely geographical
range in the world.'
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Prunella modularis

Drovetski SV, Fadeev IV, Rakovic M, Lopes RJ, Boano G, Pavia M, Koblik EA, Lohman YV, Red’kin YA, Aghayan SA, Reis S, Drovetskaya SS, Voelker G. 2018. A test of the European Pleistocene refugial paradigm, using a Western Palaearctic endemic bird species. Proc. R. Soc. B, 285: 20181606.
[full paper]

Hewitt’s paradigm for effects of Pleistocene glaciations on European populations assumes their isolation in peninsular refugia during glacial maxima, followed by re-colonization of broader Europe during interstadials. This paradigm is well supported by studies of poorly dispersing taxa, but highly dispersive birds have not been included. To test this paradigm, we use the dunnock (Prunella modularis), a Western Palaearctic endemic whose range includes all major European refugia. MtDNA gene tree, multilocus species tree and species delimitation analyses indicate the presence of three distinct lineages: one in the Iberian refugium, one in the Caucasus refugium, and one comprising the Italian and Balkan refugia and broader Europe. Our gene flow analysis suggests isolation of both the Iberian and Caucasus lineages but extensive exchange between Italy, the Balkans and broader Europe. Demographic stability could not be rejected for any refugial population, except the very recent expansion in the Caucasus. By contrast, northern European populations may have experienced two expansion periods. Iberia and Caucasus had much smaller historical populations than other populations. Although our results support the paradigm, in general, they also suggest that in highly dispersive taxa, isolation of neighbouring refugia was incomplete, resulting in large super-refugial populations.
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
From IOC:

P. m. hebridiumMeinertzhagen, R, 1934Ireland and the Hebrides (w of Scotland)
P. m. occidentalis(Hartert, 1910)Scotland (except the Hebrides), England and w France
P. m. modularis(Linnaeus, 1758)n and c Europe
P. m. mabbottiHarper, 1919Iberian Pen., sc France and Italy
P. m. meinertzhageniHarrison, JM & Pateff, 1937the Balkans
P. m. fuscataMauersberger, 1971s Crimean Pen. (n coast of the Black Sea)
P. m. euxinaWatson, 1961nw and n Turkey
P. m. obscura(Hablizl, 1783)ne Turkey, the Caucasus and n Iran


From this study, perhaps the number of subspecies should be reduced to just three, Iberian (perhaps mabbotti but this described from southern France), Italy/Balkan/Northern modularis, and Caucasus obscura?
 

Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
Marco Pavia, Sergei V. Drovetski, Giovanni Boano, Kevin W. Conway, Irene Pellegrino, and Gary Voelker "Elevation of two subspecies of Dunnock Prunella modularis to species rank," Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 141(2), 199-210, (15 June 2021). Elevation of two subspecies of Dunnock Prunella modularis to species rank

The Western Palearctic endemic Dunnock Prunella modularis was recently revealed to comprise three distinct genetic lineages, each distributed in different Pleistocene refugia. Specifically, one is isolated in the Iberian refugium, another is confined to the Caucasus refugium, and the third is distributed in both the Italian and Balkan refugia, as well as across broader Europe. There is a probable absence of gene flow between the refugia. Analysis of plumage and song characteristics reveals robust differences between the Iberian subspecies P. m. mabbotti, Caucasian P. m. obscura and nominate P. m. modularis. Our assessments, in conjunction with genetic isolation, support species recognition under the Phylogenetic, Biological and Comprehensive Biological Species Concepts, via qualitative and quantitative criteria, and diagnosability. We thus propose the elevation of Iberian Dunnock P. mabbotti and Caucasian Dunnock P. obscura to species level.

Open access
 

Xenospiza

Distracted
Supporter
Another example of finding the most minimal unrelated differences to achieve two new birds to tick that you have already seen...
 

daveholden

Well-known member
Another example of finding the most minimal unrelated differences to achieve two new birds to tick that you have already seen...
It needs to be read in conjunction with the earlier paper in post 15 - the genetic difference between "Caucasian Dunnock" and nominate modularis is similar to the difference between raddes and black-throated (and way more than the difference between brown and Kozlov's). Haven't been to the Caucasus (so no field experience) but the song and plumage differences are well described in the paper (and the plumage difference was covered in BWP).
Not so sure about the Pyrenenean race being a full species though - looks and sounds pretty similar to nominate, so if it's a cryptic species it's very cryptic. Shame, because that's the one I've seen...
 

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