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Puffinus baroli (1 Viewer)

Gonçalo Elias

Well-known member
Portugal
The Barolo Shearwater is named after "Carlo Tencredi Falletti Marchese di Barolo (1782–1838), Italian philanthropist and collector of books and objets d’art" (according to Jamed Joblling's dictionary).

As far as I could find, this man was not directly connected to science. Maybe he sponsored some investigation and Bonaparte decided to honour him by giving his name to a bird?
 

Taphrospilus

Well-known member
OD not really a help on this https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k99025b/f204. We might have to look in the environment of Franco Andrea Bonelli (1784-1830) for him.

I am not sure why not e.g. Marchese Guiseppe Ottavio Falleti di Barolo or others of the family? ( Giuseppe Ottavio Falletti di Barolo (1753-1828)). See here:

Accademici Nazionali residenti in Torino

Direttore

Marchese Ottavio Falletti di Barolo

Maybe there is more confusion as we can find also Ottavio Alessandro Falletti di Barolo (1753-1828)
 
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l_raty

laurent raty
In 1872, Salvadori (Fauna d'Italia; https://books.google.com/books?id=9dgoypOli8kC&pg=PA300 ) wrote:
Nel Museo di Torino si conserva ancora il tipo del Puffinus baroli, menzionato dal Bonaparte. Esso è registrato nel vecchio catalogo del Museo, n. 3202, di mano del Bonelli, col nome di Procellaria obscura, ma porta ancora allaccato al piede un cartellino sul quale è scritto: Procellaria Barolii (T.) Viaggio Bonelli 1820 (Baillon). Appare da ciò che il Bonelli acquistò quell' individuo dal sig. Baillon durante un suo viaggio nel 1820. Quell' individuo non ha alcuna indicazione precisa di patria, e per nulla affatto quella di Mediterraneo, attribuitagli dal Bonaparte sulla fede del cartel lino errato, attaccato alla base. Ora questo Puffinus è alquanto più piccolo dell' anglorum, ha le ali più brevi e le piume laterali posteriori del sottocoda di color nero-bruno uniforme ed appartiene senza alcun dubbio alla specie che Kuhl, Temminck e Schlegel hanno descritto col nome di Puffinus obscurus (1), come lo stesso Bonelli l'aveva rico nosciuto; errano adunque lo Schlegel e gli altri che riferiscono il P. barolii al P. anglorum, come anche il Gerbe riferendolo al P. yelkouan; tuttavia è possibile che il Bonaparte abbia dato nel Museo di Parigi il nome di P. barolii ad individui del P. yelkouan.
Pare inoltre che il nome di P. barolii, attribuito al Bonelli, sia invece del Temminck, giacchè il Bonelli stesso, come sopra ho detto, a lui l'attribuisce, ed è probabile che il Temminck lo desse al primo individuo da lui visto in Torino nella collezione del marchese Falletti di Barolo, cui aveva forse l'intenzione di dedicarlo, credendolo appartenente ad una nuova specie. Ignoro cosa sia avvenuto di quell' individuo, che il Temminck notò siccome preso sulle Alpi del Piemonte (!), della quale cosa è grandemente da dubitare.
To make it short: Salvadori reports that the specimen preserved in the Turin Museum, and attributed to Bonelli in the OD, bears a label written by Bonelli, on which the name Barolii is attributed to 'T.'; based on this, Salvadori suggests that the name may have been coined by Temminck, rather than by Bonelli (to whom Bonaparte attributed it).
Salvadori further suggests that Temminck may have seen the species for the first time in the collection of the marchese Falletti di Barolo in Torino. Temminck would have written somewhere (but I don't find where right now) that "this exemplar" was found on the Alps of Piedmont.

So we should probably try to find a marchese Falletti di Barolo who was a known bird collector. (Whose collection would have been sufficiently famous to justify a visit by a Dutch traveller ?)
Perhaps Temminck's text on this bird would help. Temminck may have called the bird Puffinus obscurus (or Procellaria obscura ?) in this text.
 
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James Jobling

Well-known member
In my Key MS I have:
baroli Carlo Ippolito Ernesto Tancredi Maria Falletti Marchese di Barolo (1782-1838) Italian philanthropist, collector of books and objets d’art (subsp. Puffinus lherminieri).
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Perhaps Temminck's text on this bird would help. Temminck may have called the bird Puffinus obscurus (or Procellaria obscura ?) in this text.
Got it: in the second vol. of Manuel d'Ornithologie - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/41003258 -
Le premier individu tué en Europe que je vis de cette espèce, se trouve à Turin dans la collection de M. le marquis Farletti [sic] de Barol, qui le reçût des Alpes du Piémont où il a été tué.
Not of much help to decide which Falletti di Barolo was involved, however. But this confirms Salvadori's writings.
 
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Gonçalo Elias

Well-known member
Portugal
Le premier individu tué en Europe que je vis de cette espèce, se trouve à Turin dans la collection de M. le marquis Farletti [sic] de Barol, qui le reçût des Alpes du Piémont où il a été tué.

So this means that the type specimen of this shearwater was collected in the Alps? Quite unusual for a shearwater, I would say (although it could have happened as a result of a storm). Any idea about the type locality recorded for this species?
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
I haven't looked into (the recent split) 'Barolo's Shearwater' Puffinus (assimilis/lherminieri) baroli (Bonaparte, 1857), simply as it (nowaday's) is called makaronesisk lira in Swedish (in line with the alternate English name Macaronesian shearwater), and thus I know nothing of the dedicatee himself, however (simply following what's been told/stated in this thread) it all looks a bit odd ...

...

I am not sure why not e.g. Marchese Guiseppe Ottavio Falleti di Barolo or others of the family? ( Giuseppe Ottavio Falletti di Barolo (1753-1828)). See here:



Maybe there is more confusion as we can find also Ottavio Alessandro Falletti di Barolo (1753-1828)
Same years, on both Birth and Death, on two different, suggested Falletti di Barolo. I somewhat doubt it.

Versus James's (later) Marchese di Barolo (1782-1838) ...

Surely the former 'two' (in Martin's quote above) must be some kind of mix-up ... or?

/B
--
 
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l_raty

laurent raty
So this means that the type specimen of this shearwater was collected in the Alps? Quite unusual for a shearwater, I would say (although it could have happened as a result of a storm). Any idea about the type locality recorded for this species?
The first specimen seen by Temminck, and which Salvadori thinks inspired the name, was reportedly killed in the Alps. Salvadori doubted this as well, just like you. ;)

The name as introduced by Bonaparte was obviously based on a series of specimens. At the very least (i.e., excluding the specimens included in the taxon purely through bibliographic reference) :
"Mus. Taurin. n°. 3202. a Bonellio. 1820. ex Mediterraneo"
= a specimen in the Turin Museum, n° 3202, brought by Bonelli in 1820, from the Mediterranean. This is the Turin bird Salvadori commented. He doubted the origin here too, because it was indicated on a label attached to the socle (and which which he sayd was mistaken), but not on the label attached to the specimen's foot.​
"Coll. Bailloni Abatis villae. ex Insula deserta prope Maderam"
= one or more specimen(s) in the Baillon collection at Abbeville, from the Desertas island next to Madeira.​
"Mus. Paris. a Bertheloto ex Insulis Canariis"
= one or more specimen(s) in the Paris Museum brought by Berthelot from the Canary islands.​
 
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l_raty

laurent raty
Surely the former 'two' (in Martin's quote above) must be some kind of mix-up ... or?

- Ottavio Alessandro Carlo Falletti, marchese di Barolo (alt., under the French Empire: Octave Alexandre Charles Falette de Barol, comte de l'Empire): 1753 (Torino) - 1828 (Torino).
- Carlo Ippolito Ernesto Tancredi Maria Falletti, marchese di Barolo: 1782 (Torino) - 1838 (Chiari).

The second was the son of the first.
(Which was the reason of my question in post #6. Temminck wrote the text I quoted in post #5 in or before 1820, thus the father was still alive. I would like to know if we should expect the son being termed "marchese di Barolo" before his father's death; if not, then I'd say the dedicatee ought to be the father.)
 
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Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
...
The name as introduced by Bonaparte was obviously based on a series of specimens. ...

Regarding those specimens, see;

Christophe Gouraud. 2015. List of type specimens of birds in the Baillon Collection (La Châtre, France). Part 1. Non-Passerines, Bull. B.O.C. 135 (2): pp.131–153 (here):

Some specimens from the Baillon collection used for descriptions by other naturalists are now missing from La Châtre, e.g. those mentioned by Bonaparte (1857: 204–205) when describing Procellaria baroli and Procellaria bailloni (nowadays Puffinus lherminieri baroli and Puffinus bailloni, respectively). The type of Procellaria baroli from the Baillon collection was sent to Bonelli when he was in Paris in 1820 (Salvadori 1916: 6). The Turin museum was severely damaged during the Second World War, with the loss of many specimens (Violani & Barbagli 2003). However, Elter (1986: 398) recorded a syntype of baroli given to Bonelli as being present in Turin. ...

[from the Conclusion on p.149]​

Regarding the dedicatee himself, whomever he was, I have no idea, and no opinion what-so-ever ;)

Good luck sorting it all out!
-
 
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James Jobling

Well-known member
Laurent
Your reasoning about the Barolos is faultless, although by 1857 both Ottavio and Carlo were dead. In my dictionaries and Key I followed Mearns and Mearns, 1988, Biographies for Birdwatchers, Appendix 1, p. 459.
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Sorry guys, I simply couldn't keep my fingers away from the dedicatee himself ...

- Ottavio Alessandro Carlo Falletti, marchese di Barolo (alt., under the French Empire: Octave Alexandre Charles Falette de Barol, comte de l'Empire): 1753 (Torino) - 1828 (Torino).
- Carlo Ippolito Ernesto Tancredi Maria Falletti, marchese di Barolo: 1782 (Torino) - 1838 (Chiari).

The second was the son of the first.
(Which was the reason of my question in post #6. Temminck wrote the text I quoted in post #5 in or before 1820, thus the father was still alive. I would like to know if we should expect the son being termed "marchese di Barolo" before his father's death; if not, then I'd say the dedicatee ought to be the father.)
Laurent
Your reasoning about the Barolos is faultless, although by 1857 both Ottavio and Carlo were dead. In my dictionaries and Key I followed Mearns and Mearns, 1988, Biographies for Birdwatchers, Appendix 1, p. 459.

But still, James, if Franco Andrea Bonelli (1784–1830) was in connection with a Marchese (Falletti di) Barolo, in 1820 (as told by Christophe Gouraud, as of/in post #11, and I see no reason to doubt Mr Gouraud in this claim) I would assume it ought to have been the contemporary Marchese (i.e. Senior).

And such do seems to have been the case (at least a few years later); in Calendario generale pe' Regii Stati ... (from 1824), we find Franco Andrea Bonelli and Marchese Ottavio Falleti di Barolo on the same page (here).

Also see Memorie della Accademia delle Scienze di Torino XXIX, from 1825, top of page VII (here):"Franco Andrea BONNELLI, ...", and on top of the next page VIII: "Direttore Marchese Ottavio FALLETI DI BAROLO, ..."

Wouldn't it be fair to assume that they, in those days, must have known each other (or, at least, of each other), in/among the community of Naturalists in Turin/Torino?

The same Ottavio (Alessandro) Falletti di Barolo is also mentioned (on pp.550, 554 & 557, foot-note), in the Paper L'istruzione universitaria in Piemonte dal 1799 al 1814, by Gian Paolo Romagnani (pp.536–569), from 1990, while Franco Andrea Bonnelli shows up on p.595 & 597 in the next-following Paper; L'istruzione (e la cultura) scientifica nel Piemonte in età napoleonica (pp.570–597), by Vittorio Machis, but as it's all in Italian (here) I cannot figure out if even close to relevant in this certain case, nor its (full) context.

Thus, take this post for whatever it's worth.

Hopefully of some use/help?

Björn

PS. More details on; "Ottavio Falletti marchese di Barolo" (here, all in Italian), and ditto on "Carlo Tancredi Falletti di Barolo" (here or here, also all in Italian).
--
 
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Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
One more ...

Would the son of an Italian marchese of this time be a marchese before his father dies ?
- Ottavio Alessandro Carlo Falletti, marchese di Barolo (alt., under the French Empire: Octave Alexandre Charles Falette de Barol, comte de l'Empire): 1753 (Torino) - 1828 (Torino).
- Carlo Ippolito Ernesto Tancredi Maria Falletti, marchese di Barolo: 1782 (Torino) - 1838 (Chiari).

The second was the son of the first.

(Which was the reason of my question in post #6. Temminck wrote the text I quoted in post #5 in or before 1820, thus the father was still alive. I would like to know if we should expect the son being termed "marchese di Barolo" before his father's death; if not, then I'd say the dedicatee ought to be the father.)

Kind of a long-shot, on Laurent's (repeated) question [my blue and grey above], even if I don't understand much Italian (read; very close to none), but maybe the following phrase could be of some support, or possibly even an answer?

... una delle più ricche e antiche famiglie piemontesi, Carlo Tancredi Falletti figlio di Ottavio marchese di Barolo (cui succedette nel titolo marchionale), ...
Google Translate (even if somewhat quirky):

... one of the richest and oldest Piedmontese families, Carlo Tancredi Falletti son of Ottavio Marquis of Barolo (which he succeeded in the title of the marquis), ...

[from here]​
For whatever it's worth.

/B
 

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