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Request advice on Nikon Fieldscope (1 Viewer)

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast
United States
...May I finally ask please. Would that DS be the wide field version : nothwithstanding that I am don't wish to do digiscoping, would the DS afford a great optical experience?
From your questions and lack of response, I am wondering if you missed my post #51 above (long).
I will reiterate that the 30x DS would actually be a 24x DS on your 60ED II scope.

--AP
 

jring

Well-known member
I think all the DS are wide angle unless someone wants to correct me, but the x16 x24 x30 DS is wide angle partly by nature of its lower power.

Hi,

lvydwg is correct, all DS series eyepieces are wide angle, in the MC series there are two normal fixed ones, the 20x/25x and the 27x/40x/60x (and of course the zoom EPs which are also narrow).

In general, an eyepiece is considered wide angle if it offers an apparent field of fiew (aka afov) of 60 degrees and over.
In the specifications pages Nikon lists the afov of the wide angle ones as 64 deg. If afov isn't listed you can take the true field of view (aka tfov) in degrees and multiply by the magnification. If tfov is only given in m/1000m or ft/1000yd, these values can be divided by 17.45 (for m/1000m) or 52.5 (for ft/1000yd) to get degrees. So a pair of 8x42 binoculars with 393ft/1000yd tfov have a tfov of 7.5 deg (393/52.5) and an afov 60 deg (7.5 deg times 8) and are thus just at the 60 deg limit for being called wide angle.

Note that the last conversion of multiplying tfov in deg by magnification is the quick way of doing things which ignores distortion, there is a more involved calculation including distortion (if you happen to have numerical distortion data for the EP design, like the manufacturer does), but the difference is usually just a few deg afov, so the quick way is a good first guess, just don't fret over a few deg difference between it and a possible afov value specified by the manufacturer... they are not lying but using the correct way to calculate afov including distortion.

Joachim
 

Earnest lad

Well-known member
Hi,

lvydwg is correct, all DS series eyepieces are wide angle, in the MC series there are two normal fixed ones, the 20x/25x and the 27x/40x/60x (and of course the zoom EPs which are also narrow).

In general, an eyepiece is considered wide angle if it offers an apparent field of fiew (aka afov) of 60 degrees and over.
In the specifications pages Nikon lists the afov of the wide angle ones as 64 deg. If afov isn't listed you can take the true field of view (aka tfov) in degrees and multiply by the magnification. If tfov is only given in m/1000m or ft/1000yd, these values can be divided by 17.45 (for m/1000m) or 52.5 (for ft/1000yd) to get degrees. So a pair of 8x42 binoculars with 393ft/1000yd tfov have a tfov of 7.5 deg (393/52.5) and an afov 60 deg (7.5 deg times 8) and are thus just at the 60 deg limit for being called wide angle.

Note that the last conversion of multiplying tfov in deg by magnification is the quick way of doing things which ignores distortion, there is a more involved calculation including distortion (if you happen to have numerical distortion data for the EP design, like the manufacturer does), but the difference is usually just a few deg afov, so the quick way is a good first guess, just don't fret over a few deg difference between it and a possible afov value specified by the manufacturer... they are not lying but using the correct way to calculate afov including distortion.

Joachim
Tha
Earnest lad,

To add to the confusion, please understand that jring is using WF generally to mean "wide-field" whereas when I previously recommended a WF, MC, or DS eyepiece, I was using WF to refer to the older WF series of eyepieces that are no longer shown on Nikon's website. They were of the same optical designs as the MC series but they are physically more compact because they have a fold-down eyecup rather than the twist-down design of the MC series (The DS eyepieces do not have an eyecup because they are optimized for photography, but they still work fine, especially for glasses wearers who don't use an eyecup anyway).

Most fixed eyepieces for the Fieldscopes are of widefield design but a few of the traditional (really old ones) were not and were updated with multicoating and are included in the MC series (e.g. the tiny 27/40/50x that you see on the Nikon website as compared to the much larger 27/40/50x wide MC) on the webpage Nikon | Sport Optics | MC Fieldscope Eyepieces for Observation . All of the DS series eyepieces are wide-field.

As for your question as to which is better, I don't think they differ significantly. Later production WF series eyepieces were updated to multicoating even before being updated with full multicoatings and twist eyecups as the otherwise optically identical MC series. The zoom eyepieces were also updated with better coatings over time, and the 20-60/25-75x was even redesigned slightly, once to change the optical design and another time to change the design of the housing. None of my WF series are ancient production, so I happily use WF, MC, and DS eyepieces without giving the quality of the coatings a second thought. More relevant is the overall size of the eyepiece (e.g. I prefer the WF series on the ED50 for their small size) or the design of the eyecup for sharing views with others.

As to the age of your 20-45x zoom, is it marked for the 78ED? You only photographed it from one side. I think yours is on the old side. The most recent production have some orange lettering and are marked with their magnifications on 50, 60, and 82 mm scopes.

To another of you comments/questions, if you are certain that you want 30x rather than 24x, then from my previous list of recommendations you will want to narrow your search to the 20/30/38x WF or 20/30/38x MC.

Nikon Fieldscope eyepieces are made only for the traditional Nikon Fieldscope series (not Monarch) but with adapters they can work on the Nikon EDG scopes (but not vice-versa) and with home made adapters can be used on many other scopes with a large diameter eyepiece receptacle.

As to the price of used Fieldscope eyepieces, I have no idea what to advise. New old stock units are listed regularly around $220. I've seen used listed for about the same, but I rarely see them listed. I acquired several of my used eyepieces by buying them included with a Fieldscope body because the availability was better (e.g. by buying Fieldscope II 60ED bodies plus eyepieces for $300 when what I was really after was the eyepieces). That's how I ended up with both a straight and an angled Fieldscope II 60ED.

--AP
Thank you so much. I do apologize for accidentally missing your post I didnt see it. I really appreciate you taking the trouble to share your obvious knowledge and expertise. Having read the above , I am determined to seek out a fixed eyepiece now because although I like the new scope the old EP is not entirely suitable being of narrow field of view. (I have seen such old eyepieces come with the 60mm fieldscope ii by default- mine is not marked at all for 78mm) I think perhaps a 24x or 30x fixed from what you are saying would be good for me. Perhaps 24x ideally. The man that sold me the scope lives locally by coincidence and he said he has eyepieces available. I will go see him again and ascertain what he has. I will report back if thats OK lol
 

Earnest lad

Well-known member
Hi,

lvydwg is correct, all DS series eyepieces are wide angle, in the MC series there are two normal fixed ones, the 20x/25x and the 27x/40x/60x (and of course the zoom EPs which are also narrow).

In general, an eyepiece is considered wide angle if it offers an apparent field of fiew (aka afov) of 60 degrees and over.
In the specifications pages Nikon lists the afov of the wide angle ones as 64 deg. If afov isn't listed you can take the true field of view (aka tfov) in degrees and multiply by the magnification. If tfov is only given in m/1000m or ft/1000yd, these values can be divided by 17.45 (for m/1000m) or 52.5 (for ft/1000yd) to get degrees. So a pair of 8x42 binoculars with 393ft/1000yd tfov have a tfov of 7.5 deg (393/52.5) and an afov 60 deg (7.5 deg times 8) and are thus just at the 60 deg limit for being called wide angle.

Note that the last conversion of multiplying tfov in deg by magnification is the quick way of doing things which ignores distortion, there is a more involved calculation including distortion (if you happen to have numerical distortion data for the EP design, like the manufacturer does), but the difference is usually just a few deg afov, so the quick way is a good first guess, just don't fret over a few deg difference between it and a possible afov value specified by the manufacturer... they are not lying but using the correct way to calculate afov including distortion.

Joachim
That is most helpful. The mathematics of the situation is something I must spend some time on to get my head round, but it is good to have a grasp of this kind of matter, whether in photography or scoping. It is helpful to know all DS are wide angle in case I see one. I am keen to get a fixed one.
There is a ED82 that has been on ebay for some time here in UK (previously mentioned in this thread) at £650 gbp. I sent him a message enquiring about which EP it has . He replied it is the MCII . I checked and the eyepiece along retaiils for about £350
 

Earnest lad

Well-known member
Please would anyone be able to advise as to whether the EP advertised here would provide an improved experience with my new scope (bearing in mind it came with the standard 20x-45x zoom eyepiece) particularly as respects eye relief, field of view, optical performance

 

Ivydwg

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Please would anyone be able to advise as to whether the EP advertised here would provide an improved experience with my new scope (bearing in mind it came with the standard 20x-45x zoom eyepiece) particularly as respects eye relief, field of view, optical performance

Evening. With the advertised eyepiece (MC11) you will get that bit more zoom but note as you hit the higher magnifications the image notably darkens and the FOV is very narrow. Also note magnifications much above x30-x40 and sometimes even lower can be severely hampered by atmospheric conditions, depending on how far in the distance you are looking.

I don't know whether there is FOV advantage over your current zoom eyepiece but I do find the MC11 zoom annoyingly narrow at times. Depends what you are looking at!

I guess there could be superior coatings with the MC11, I am sure others would advise.

My suggestion would be to wait for a X30 or x37 DS or MC, the wide angle view should be very noticeable.

I have not used your eyepiece before though so others might provide another viewpoint.
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast
United States
Please would anyone be able to advise as to whether the EP advertised here would provide an improved experience with my new scope (bearing in mind it came with the standard 20x-45x zoom eyepiece) particularly as respects eye relief, field of view, optical performance

Most users prefer that zoom to the one you have, but I wouldn't bother. As Ivydwg explained, the higher magnification has limited utility. Also, it provides no advantages of FOV, eye relief etc. This doesn't appear to be the latest version of the MCII zoom (which has markings for the 50ED), but the coatings are likely slightly better than the one you have, but not enough to notice since Nikon coatings have always been quite good.

The fixed wide will be a totally different experience.

--AP
 

Earnest lad

Well-known member
Evening. With the advertised eyepiece (MC11) you will get that bit more zoom but note as you hit the higher magnifications the image notably darkens and the FOV is very narrow. Also note magnifications much above x30-x40 and sometimes even lower can be severely hampered by atmospheric conditions, depending on how far in the distance you are looking.

I don't know whether there is FOV advantage over your current zoom eyepiece but I do find the MC11 zoom annoyingly narrow at times. Depends what you are looking at!

I guess there could be superior coatings with the MC11, I am sure others would advise.

My suggestion would be to wait for a X30 or x37 DS or MC, the wide angle view should be very noticeable.

I have not used your eyepiece before though so others might provide another viewpoint.
Thank you once more. I appreciate the insight into the MCII which I am now resolved not to go for. I am thinking to go for a fixed eyepiece - maybe 24x or similar. Mind you there doesn't seem to be many of these available on ebay. Would that seem a wise decision please?
 

Earnest lad

Well-known member
Most users prefer that zoom to the one you have, but I wouldn't bother. As Ivydwg explained, the higher magnification has limited utility. Also, it provides no advantages of FOV, eye relief etc. This doesn't appear to be the latest version of the MCII zoom (which has markings for the 50ED), but the coatings are likely slightly better than the one you have, but not enough to notice since Nikon coatings have always been quite good.

The fixed wide will be a totally different experience.

--AP
Thank you. As mentioned above, I am now resolved not to go for that particular eyepiece. As far as I can tell, from what I have read in this thread (really helpful everyone thank you) is that for my scope, to obtain a wider field of view would be desirable. That being the case if I can attain the wider field of view with the scope at maybe 24x or 30x that would be desirable. A fixed eyepiece as mentioned by Ivydwg above x30 or x37 DS would be great.
Sorry to go on but I saw the following advertised to, and wondered if anyone might be able to advise what would be the purpose of it.
 

Ivydwg

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Thank you once more. I appreciate the insight into the MCII which I am now resolved not to go for. I am thinking to go for a fixed eyepiece - maybe 24x or similar. Mind you there doesn't seem to be many of these available on ebay. Would that seem a wise decision please?
Yes a lower power, fixed, wide angle eyepiece will provide another dimension in terms of optical quality.

As previously discussions they are hard to get hold of unless you buy from Japan. But with import duties expect to pay over £200 easily.
 

Earnest lad

Well-known member
Yes a lower power, fixed, wide angle eyepiece will provide another dimension in terms of optical quality.

As previously discussions they are hard to get hold of unless you buy from Japan. But with import duties expect to pay over £200 easily.
Thank you again. I would be paying more for the eyepiece than I paid for the scope LOL. Still I imagine such an EP would have resaleable value were I ever to no longer need it. Mind you, I don't think I will go for the Japan option to be honest. I think I will first of all try out the new scope with the existing EP and get used to it. In the meantime I will keep my eye open in case a low power fixed wide EP second hand turns up somewhere. Many thanks.Ian
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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