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RFI: Communication technologies and negative effects on birdlife (1 Viewer)

Simon Wates

Well-known member
Please don't shoot me down!

As all of us on here, I am concerned about birdlife conservation. I am the last person to be drawn into conspiracy theories about 5G networks. In my limited capacity regarding real knowledge about this technology I have shunned all the rantings and pseudoscience. In fact it infuriates me. However there does seem to be something relevant to know about this, maybe. I'm sure some serious scientists are looking into this. Surely it would be irresponsible to simply shun any possibility of concern?

I would be grateful to hear knowledgable opinions and if there are really some legitimate concerns.

Below are 2 studies that have looked into this subject and seem to be solid ones from trusted sources - but then I am not at all qualified to know.

https://www.nature.com/news/electronics-noise-disorients-migratory-birds-1.15176#/b2 (I found the video fascinating)

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-22271-3#author-information (This one concerns insect life)
 

Borjam

Registered User
Supporter
I've read the insect study. Which is not a study but a numerical simulation.

I think I can point out at least one error. Frequencies above 2 GHz are indeed used for many purposes. There are WiFi networks on 5 GHz (although with the advantage of a lower leakage outside homes thanks to the smaller wavelength), there are wireless links using higher powers than non licensed WiFi on many different bands above 2 GHz, there are space communications (earth to satellite) and there is a very high power application: radar.

And, for example, I do operate a 60 GHz data transmission link. Equipment is widely available and affordable now.

Have you observed any problems with insects around radar installations?

One of the simulations they mention, the result of an exposure to a 1 V/m field at 60 GHz, would result in a heating of 3 × 10–6 K/s, that is, 0.000003 K/s (K is degree Kelvin I imagine). So I guess these effects would be infinitesimal compared to the heating caused by sunlight or even the insect's own physical activity.

Also I am amazed at some more than questionable articles mentioned in the bibliography, for example the famous Alfonso Balmori, someone who published a "study" involving tadpoles and a spectrum analyzer and who seems to be unable to give actual measuring units in a paper.

As for the article on birds, I have just skimmed over it. They focus on low frequencies (below 5 MHz) which is interesting because medium wave broadcasts (550 - 1600 KHz) are being phased out being replaced by more FM broadcasts (88 - 108 MHz), DAB (200 MHz?) or just streaming audio over the Internet received with mobile phones. There is virtually no radio transmissions below 80 MHz in cities now, except for the odd amateur radio operator or embassy.

Which I guess would be good news for the birds, as the frequency response of their magnetical organs will likely reject high frequencies making them harmless for them.

In short: the situation for migratory birds would be improving, with the most disturbances being experienced between the 1920's and around 2000.
 

Simon Wates

Well-known member
I've read the insect study. Which is not a study but a numerical simulation.

I think I can point out at least one error. Frequencies above 2 GHz are indeed used for many purposes. There are WiFi networks on 5 GHz (although with the advantage of a lower leakage outside homes thanks to the smaller wavelength), there are wireless links using higher powers than non licensed WiFi on many different bands above 2 GHz, there are space communications (earth to satellite) and there is a very high power application: radar.

And, for example, I do operate a 60 GHz data transmission link. Equipment is widely available and affordable now.

Have you observed any problems with insects around radar installations?

One of the simulations they mention, the result of an exposure to a 1 V/m field at 60 GHz, would result in a heating of 3 × 10–6 K/s, that is, 0.000003 K/s (K is degree Kelvin I imagine). So I guess these effects would be infinitesimal compared to the heating caused by sunlight or even the insect's own physical activity.

Also I am amazed at some more than questionable articles mentioned in the bibliography, for example the famous Alfonso Balmori, someone who published a "study" involving tadpoles and a spectrum analyzer and who seems to be unable to give actual measuring units in a paper.

As for the article on birds, I have just skimmed over it. They focus on low frequencies (below 5 MHz) which is interesting because medium wave broadcasts (550 - 1600 KHz) are being phased out being replaced by more FM broadcasts (88 - 108 MHz), DAB (200 MHz?) or just streaming audio over the Internet received with mobile phones. There is virtually no radio transmissions below 80 MHz in cities now, except for the odd amateur radio operator or embassy.

Which I guess would be good news for the birds, as the frequency response of their magnetical organs will likely reject high frequencies making them harmless for them.

In short: the situation for migratory birds would be improving, with the most disturbances being experienced between the 1920's and around 2000.

Many thanks indeed Borjam! That is enlightening - really appreciated.
 

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