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Saltators (1 Viewer)

Richard Klim

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Chaves, J. A.; Klicka, J.; MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETICS, PHYLOGEOGRAPHY AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF SALTATORS (Abstract ID:6648). Abstract

Saltators by IOC 2.8 - placed in Cardinalidae, by Clements 6.5 and TiF 2.74 - in Thraupidae, Actual AOU NACC and SACC checklists - as Incertae sedis but "Saltator" rufiventris by SACC in Thraupidae.

Related papers:
Klicka, Burns & Spellman, 2007. Defining a monophyletic Cardinalini: A molecular perspective. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 45 (2007) 1014–1032. PDF
Weir, Bermingham & Schluter, 2009: The Great American Biotic Interchange in Birds. PNAS 106 (51) 21737-21742. Supporting information PDF

SACC Proposals:
321. Remove Parkerthraustes and Saltator from Cardinalidae Passed
322. Remove Saltatricula from Emberizidae Passed
427. Transfer Saltator rufiventris from the Cardinalidae to the Thraupidae Passed
344. Merge Saltatricula into Saltator Did not pass
351. Transfer Saltator and Saltatricula from Incertae Sedis to Thraupidae Did not pass
Chaves, Hidalgo & Klicka (in press). Biogeography and evolutionary history of the Neotropical genus Saltator (Aves: Thraupini). J Biogeogr. [abstract] [supp info]
After confirming the placement of Saltator rufiventris outside Saltator (Fig. 1; Klicka et al., 2007), we omitted this taxon from all further analyses. ...

From a purely taxonomic point of view, the genus Saltator as currently configured remains paraphyletic. Despite its morphological dissimilarity, Saltatricula multicolor is clearly a member of this genus. Saltator coerulescens and S. maximus both harbour deeply divergent clades occurring on either side of the Isthmus of Panama. Minimally, these clades warrant recognition as phylogenetic species. Recent studies in Neotropical birds have revealed that traditional species-level taxa often conceal cryptic, genetically divergent lineages that are later found to represent new species (e.g. Milá et al., 2012). We recovered several such lineages within Saltator (S. maximus, S. grossus, S. aurantiirostris, S. coerulescens and S. striatipectus; see Fig. 2), although additional work on these taxa is required to better inform any additional taxonomic revisions. If these splits represent hidden lineages and given that most of these 'cryptic splits' have occurred during the Pleistocene, a more prominent role of Quaternary diversification in this group should be acknowledged.
  • Saltator multicolor - Many-colored Chaco Finch
  • Saltator (coerulescens) grandis - Middle American (Grayish) Saltator [Monroe & Sibley 1993, Hilty 2003]
  • Saltator (maximus) magnoides - Middle American Buff-throated Saltator
 
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Richard Klim

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Rufous-bellied 'Saltator'

Brewer 2011 (HBW 16):
Recent molecular-genetic analyses indicate that this species is closer to thraupid genera Delothraupis and Dubusia and may merit placement in a separate genus, for which a new name would be needed; further study required.

AOU-SACC:
25b. Hellack and Schnell (1977, REFs) previously noted that "Saltator" rufiventris was an unusual saltator based on plumage and morphology. Genetic data (Klicka et al. 2007, Chaves et al. 2013) have revealed that "Saltator" rufiventris is definitely not a saltator but a tanager, closely related to Delothraupis and Dubusia. SACC proposal passed to move to Thraupidae. Because there is no other genus name available, the species is maintained here provisionally, as indicated by quotation marks, pending a proposal to move to Dubusia or naming of a new genus.
 
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pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Proposal 879 passed (some time ago, actually) for a three way split (S. grandis = Middle American, S. olivascens = Caribbean, and S. coerulescens = Amazonian groups), but is awaiting English name decisions in order to be implemented.

I am in the midst of writing up an English names proposal but do not have a lot of my books at hand. If anyone can find any in print use of English names for these three beyond what HBW/Birdlife or eBird/Clements use for group names, I'd be interested to know about it, to see what precedent there might be out there.

Cheers in advance,
Josh
 

James Jobling

Well-known member
Hellmayr, 1938, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. XI, gave the following English names:

Saltator coerulescens grandis (Lichtenstein, 1830) - Lichtenstein's Saltator

Saltator coerulescens olivascens Cabanis, 1849 - Olivascent Saltator

Saltator coerulescens coerulescens Vieillot, 1817 - Grayish Saltator
 

Peter Boesman

Well-known member
Proposal 879 passed (some time ago, actually) for a three way split (S. grandis = Middle American, S. olivascens = Caribbean, and S. coerulescens = Amazonian groups), but is awaiting English name decisions in order to be implemented.

I am in the midst of writing up an English names proposal but do not have a lot of my books at hand. If anyone can find any in print use of English names for these three beyond what HBW/Birdlife or eBird/Clements use for group names, I'd be interested to know about it, to see what precedent there might be out there.

Cheers in advance,
Josh
S. (c) grandis : Middle American Saltator (W. Deppe, 1830) in A.O.U. Checklist of North American birds
 

Ian Lewis

aka Gryllo
Europe
On a different subject has the proposal for the multi-way split of the Rufous Antpitta complex been accepted by SACC?

Is that also waiting on English name decisions?

That seems to have been in limbo even longer that the saltator one.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Josh, I read the comments in the proposal and have negative feelings towards those proposals that include the word Caribbean. To use a combination including this word for a species that does not occur on Caribbean islands makes no sense to me.

Niels
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
Josh, I read the comments in the proposal and have negative feelings towards those proposals that include the word Caribbean. To use a combination including this word for a species that does not occur on Caribbean islands makes no sense to me.

Niels
Agree with that. In flippant mode, just googled "drab" synonyms. Might that help?

synonyms: colourless, grey, greyish, dull, dull-coloured, washed out, neutral, pale, muted, lacklustre, lustreless, muddy, watery, lightish brown, brownish, brownish-grey, mousy, dun-coloured, dingy, dreary, dismal, cheerless, gloomy, sombre, depressing, uninteresting, boring, tedious, monotonous, dry, wearisome, unexciting, bland, non-stimulating, unimaginative, uninspiring, uninspired, insipid, vapid, flat, stale, trite, vacuous, feeble, pallid, wishy-washy, limp, lame, tired, lifeless, zestless, spiritless, sterile, anaemic, barren, tame, bloodless, antiseptic, middle-of-the-road, run-of-the-mill, commonplace, mediocre, nondescript, characterless, mundane, unexceptional, unremarkable, humdrum, prosaic
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Josh, I read the comments in the proposal and have negative feelings towards those proposals that include the word Caribbean. To use a combination including this word for a species that does not occur on Caribbean islands makes no sense to me.

Niels
It occurs in Trinidad, isn't that the Caribbean?
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
It occurs in Trinidad, isn't that the Caribbean?
In a biogeography sense it is South America, both when thinking about the bird species found there and thinking about the northern mountain range in Trinidad being called the eastern continuation of the Venezuelan Andes.
Niels
 

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