Scientific Names as well as vernacular names please! (1 Viewer)

Binocularface

You've all got one...............!
Hi,

I am not being pedantic here, but would it be possible for anyone posting names of plants in a thread to use scientific names alongside the vernacular name. Vernacular names tend to be variable depending on which field guide/taxonomy you use and sometimes what region you are in, whereas scientific names tend to be fairly static. The use of scientific names will also mean that forum members that are not familiar with 'British names' will be able to understand what species are being discussed.

Am I on my own here are does a post to this effect warrant being placed as a 'sticky'?

Regards
B
 

Xenospiza

Distracted
I agree... although I don't always give scientific names. Especially when dealing with plants (or people) outside the UK, scientific names are a must.
A simple version of the British list is here: www.bsbi.org.uk/BSBI2007.xls
 

Dog

Well-known member
I think the best way is to have English & Latin so when Tristan goes off off on his Lady's mantles I don't have to get Stace out to see what hes on about.

Mike.
 

dantheman

Bah humbug
The same should go for many of the invertebrates as well, no?

I try to if I'm ever able to help with an id (ok rarely). Many of the more obscure ones only having the latin anyway.
 

Binocularface

You've all got one...............!
I think the best way is to have English & Latin so when Tristan goes off off on his Lady's mantles I don't have to get Stace out to see what hes on about.

Mike.

You mean Alchemillas of course don't you Mike ;)
 

Jos Stratford

Beast from the East
Hi,

I am not being pedantic here, but would it be possible for anyone posting names of plants in a thread to use scientific names alongside the vernacular name.

The idea is good in theory, but there are drawbacks - if someone, for example, was asking the best habitat to find Three-toed Woodpecker, I would be quite happy to post a quick answer suggesting old growths of spruce, especially in wet areas. However, if that means I have to start searching the Latin names before posting, then probably I would not bother replying at all. Which is better, answer without scientific name or no answer? If the reader doesn't know, he can equally check the species.

This becomes even more so in a general birding or butterfly thread, when describing various plants seen during the day.
 
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Binocularface

You've all got one...............!
The idea is good in theory, but there are drawbacks - if someone, for example, was asking the best habitat to find Three-toed Woodpecker, I would be quite happy to post a quick answer suggesting old growths of spruce, especially in wet areas. However, if that means I have to start searching the Latin names before posting, then probably I would not bother replying at all. Which is better, answer without scientific name or no answer? If the reader doesn't know, he can equally check the species.

This becomes even more so in a general birding or butterfly thread, when describing various plants seen during the day.

I meant specifically on this sub-forum!
 

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