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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Sharp-tailed sparrow sp., New York (1 Viewer)

birderbf

Wild, Wild West ................... ern Spindalis
Hi all,

I photographed this bird in habitat that has held both sharp-tailed sparrow species over the last week. I will save my own thoughts secret for now to keep other guesses unbiased.

Any thoughts or good resources are appreciated.
 

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    STS sp.jpg
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Jim M.

Choose Civility
Looks like a pretty typical Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow to me. Note the long bill, dark breast streaking, thin fairly well-defined malar stripe, white throat, lack of sharp demarcation between the breast and belly, relatively thin ochre supercilium, large gray auricular patch, and flat rather than rounded head.

Compare with this Nelson's: http://www.birddigiscoping.com/blognel2007.jpg

Here is a Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow: http://10000birds.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/petes.jpg

In any event, thanks for posting. Good to get practice on these.

Best,
Jim

P.S. to durham giant: Le Conte's Sparrow would be quite rare in New York. Long bill, flat head, thick breast streaks, among other features, count against it also.
 
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durham giant

Well-known member
yes, I suppose so. Now i'm in the saltmarsh camp. My pic shows nelson's as being vivid, and this bird isn't. Also, could i steer you to another tread by bobsofpa which asks about american sparrows in pensylvania.
DURHAM GIANT
 

AsterixnObelix

Well-known member
I am going to agree with Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow instead of Nelson's because of the flat head and long beak coupled with the dark marking above the eye.
 

birderbf

Wild, Wild West ................... ern Spindalis
Excellent comments!

In the field my inital thought was Satlmarsh, but I hadn't seen one with streaks that blurry nor with as much buff. Also, a definite Nelson's popped up just after this one did (below), and I wasn't sure if they were different individuals until I got home.

Interestingly, this bird and about four Nelson's were seen on a twitch chasing after a LeConte's! Unfortunately the LeConte's relocated overnight and I did not see it, but the Nelson's were lifers.

Thanks again!
 

Attachments

  • WEB NELSON'S SHARP-TAILED SPARROW (duller streaked bird breast) Plum Beach, Brooklyn, 10.9.08.jpg
    WEB NELSON'S SHARP-TAILED SPARROW (duller streaked bird breast) Plum Beach, Brooklyn, 10.9.08.jpg
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AsterixnObelix

Well-known member
Excellent comments!

In the field my inital thought was Satlmarsh, but I hadn't seen one with streaks that blurry nor with as much buff. Also, a definite Nelson's popped up just after this one did (below), and I wasn't sure if they were different individuals until I got home.

Interestingly, this bird and about four Nelson's were seen on a twitch chasing after a LeConte's! Unfortunately the LeConte's relocated overnight and I did not see it, but the Nelson's were lifers.

Thanks again!

Congratulations on the lifer. Would you mind sharing the location, where you were birding?
 

birderbf

Wild, Wild West ................... ern Spindalis
Congratulations on the lifer. Would you mind sharing the location, where you were birding?

Plum Beach, just east of exit 9 (Knapp St) on the Belt. I walked all the way to the east end of the beach then north toward the bridge. At low tide you can walk a little ways up the mouth of a river. Lots of both sharp-taileds, someone saw an immature Seaside, and Clapper and Virginia Rails have been seen recently too. Also the home of a LeConte's Sparrow and a Yellow Wagtail this season.
 

AsterixnObelix

Well-known member
Plum Beach, just east of exit 9 (Knapp St) on the Belt. I walked all the way to the east end of the beach then north toward the bridge. At low tide you can walk a little ways up the mouth of a river. Lots of both sharp-taileds, someone saw an immature Seaside, and Clapper and Virginia Rails have been seen recently too. Also the home of a LeConte's Sparrow and a Yellow Wagtail this season.

Thanks for sharing birderbf - Oh man...how lucky! I know the place, in fact, I recently, co-captained a beach cleanup there with the NYC Audubon and American Littoral Society...we even planted Spartina and Beach Grass out there. Though, I must admit, I have never really gone out there for birds....more for photographing horse shoe crabs and the beach plums when they are in bloom.

I know exactly where you are referencing...I will have to get out there myself. Those birds you mentioned would be lifers for me, so it is an added incentive. Again..thanks for sharing.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
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