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Shieldbugs. (1 Viewer)

ApusApus

Well-known member
Not really sure on this but you may have a Plasterer Bee here, possibly one of the Hylaeus species!


Shane
 

Papa 10

Miserable Old Git
Not really sure on this but you may have a Plasterer Bee here, possibly one of the Hylaeus species!


Shane

Thank you Shane and I will go with Hylaeus sp as it is a far better 'fit'.

I've come to the conclusion that I'll stick to the obvious (easy) insects to I/D e.g. Sphaerophoria scripta, Mesembrina meridiana etc; and place the rest in an 'Insects of Smalley Dam' file then hopefully it will give the future generation an insight.
Thanks again Roland
 

PaulClack

Well-known member
Three for ID

Morning all

Hope you can help. These three critters have turned up in my garden and house of late and not knowing much about shield bugs I thought I would try and ID. Suggestions are:

1. Birch shieldbug
2. Juniper shieldbug
3. Something else - not a shieldbug but an interesting and large beast! I'm going for Western conifer seed bug based on this:

http://www.britishbugs.org.uk/heteroptera/Coreidae/leptoglossus_occidentalis.html

It was inside the house so maybe trying to hibernate.

Any help appreciated thanks.

P
 

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PaulClack

Well-known member
Thanks both

Flushed with success I headed into the garden this afternoon with an umbrella and stick and bashed these from the bushes. Suggestions:

1. Green shield bug (c13mm)
2. Hawthorn shield bug (c13mm)
3. Birch again (8-9mm)
4. Parent bug? (c8mm)

But please correct me if these are wrong!!

Cheers,
P
 

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harry eales

Ancient Entomologist
Not the best photo I've ever taken, but hopefully this is enough for someone to tell me what this is?
It was by a pond in north Wiltshire, with a hawthorn hedge and mixed woodland nearby.

Hello,

Your Shieldbug is P. rufipes, or The Forest Shieldbug which is by no means confined to forests, it's virtually everywhere. The red legs and the 'Joan Collins Dynasty style shoulder pads' give it away.

Harry
 

Surreybirder

Ken Noble
I found this really small shieldbug on a silver birch in our garden. It seems to be sitting on eggs. Sorry the photo is a bit dark - it was evening. I assume it's a common species.
 

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aeshna5

Well-known member
Yes- not a great photo but looks good for Parent Bug, Elasmucha grisea, with her nymphs below her. Usually on birch or alder.
 

Surreybirder

Ken Noble
Thanks, Aeshna,
Here's another photo. I don't like it as much but perhaps it shows the parent bug better.
 

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Thanks, Aeshna,
Here's another photo. I don't like it as much but perhaps it shows the parent bug better.

'Stink bugs' is a common name for those in my area, our households keep infested by those regularly.
It's a female bug which is obvious, not only because of eggs but the size and the shield shape. It also seems like a brown marmorated bug for me, check this article if you want to compare. If it's in your garden I would recommend if not whacking it, but to transfer somewhere else, to the nearest forest maybe.
 

aeshna5

Well-known member
'Stink bugs' is a common name for those in my area, our households keep infested by those regularly.
It's a female bug which is obvious, not only because of eggs but the size and the shield shape. It also seems like a brown marmorated bug for me, check this article if you want to compare. If it's in your garden I would recommend if not whacking it, but to transfer somewhere else, to the nearest forest maybe.

It's a Parent Bug + there is no need to be alarmist. No problem with these being in the garden. They are not going to infest a house. If one accidentally gets in it won't be able to survive without food.
 

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
I saw this shield bug? in Sri Lanka. in the Sinharaja forest area in December last year.
I feel kind of helpless:-C having to ask for help with nearly every insect exept butterflies. Does anyone know of a good site for Sri Lankan insects? Are there any books that are not too expensive than you know of that I could buy?

Thanks very much for your help.
 

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Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
PHD in Googling, hope you can still use your phone (if its Chinese)
 

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