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Shorebird help - Middle Tn (1 Viewer)

SusieRuss

Well-known member
Hi - I'm not sure if any id can be made with these rather rotten photos. The first two are the same bird - a larger shorebird. I put in photo #2 with the Great Egret just for size. #3 is two different species, but I can't tell what. #4 is a photo of a peep in the same area, different pond. Thanks for any help you can give!!
 

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Butty

Well-known member
The dates are important for ID. Could you give those, please? Thanks.
I'm guess that 'Tn' is a state in USA?
 

Butty

Well-known member
1-2. A species of yellowlegs.
3. The 3? in front may be least sandpipers. The other one might be a pectoral sandpiper - or not.
4. Maybe semipalmated sandpiper, maybe not.
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
1-2. A species of yellowlegs.
3. The 3? in front may be least sandpipers. The other one might be a pectoral sandpiper - or not.
4. Maybe semipalmated sandpiper, maybe not.
I agree with this except i think the larger one in 3 may be Baird's. The wings don't extend far beyond the tail but they are within variation. I think the buff face and back pattern is more like that species too. However, difficult to be sure with a pic like this!
 

Butty

Well-known member
larger one in 3 may be Baird's
Purely on relative sizes, that seems unlikely (assuming the small ones are least sandpipers - if they're anything else, relative sizes would make an ID of the large one as Baird's sandpiper even more unlikely).
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
Purely on relative sizes, that seems unlikely (assuming the small ones are least sandpipers - if they're anything else, relative sizes would make an ID of the large one as Baird's sandpiper even more unlikely).
Hmm perhaps you're right. Svensson has sizes as 14.5, 17 and 23 cm for the 3 species [Baird 17]. So perhaps it is pectoral after all.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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