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Short-tailed Green Magpie (1 Viewer)

Richard Klim

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Other papers in the pipeline from Frank Rheindt et al:
  • Van Balen, Eaton & Rheindt. Biology, taxonomy and conservation status of the Short-tailed Green Magpie Cissa thalassina from Java. Submitted.
Van Balen, Eaton & Rheindt. Biology, taxonomy and conservation status of the Short-tailed Green Magpie Cissa [t.] thalassina from Java. Bird Conserv Int: in press.
Summary
The Short-tailed Green Magpie Cissa thalassina, a member of an Asian lineage of uniquely coloured corvids, is represented by two subspecies, thalassina and jefferyi, that occur on the islands of Java and Borneo, respectively. The distinct Javan nominate form is poorly described in the literature and next to nothing is published on its biology and occurrence in the wild. We here document the biology and distribution of this taxon based on hitherto unpublished historical data and on our own fieldwork. We also analyse vocal data of jefferyi, thalassina and two other Cissa species and show that jefferyi and thalassina are well-differentiated, and that thalassina is bioacoustically more similar to another Cissa species from the Asian mainland. We also demonstrate important and significant biometric differences between jefferyi and thalassina that may reflect divergent adaptations to the environment, as well as plumage differences that may serve signalling functions. Finally, the application of a novel species delimitation test [Tobias et al. (2010)] to our data suggests that jefferyi and thalassina deserve to be classified as biological species because their phenotypic divergence exceeds that found in many sympatric species. The revised taxonomic status of Javan thalassina invites a reconsideration of its threat status. Based on its restricted range, extreme rarity and threats by bird trapping and habitat destruction, we consider the Javan Green Magpie as globally Critically Endangered.
Proposes species status for:
  • Cissa [t] thalassina - Javan Green Magpie
  • Cissa [t] jefferyi - Bornean Green Magpie
(Listed as possible species by Monroe & Sibley 1993.)​

Madge 2009 (HBW 14).

[With thanks to Frank Rheindt.]
 
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chris butterworth

aka The Person Named Above
About time as well. I've always considered the white-eyed birds in Borneo as being sufficiently distinct from the Javan birds to be elevated to full species status ( I have already done so in my personal life list but thats neither here nor there )
 

James Eaton

Trent Valley Crew
Have you been lucky enough to see Javan Green Magpie, Chris? Any details would be greatly appreciated - you may notice in the paper that they are rather rare now!

Cheers,

J
 

chris butterworth

aka The Person Named Above
I'm afraid I've only seen photos James. I've always thought that the startling white eye of the Bornean taxon is sufficiently different to prevent any hybridisation if the two met in the wild.

Chris

BTW What's your take on the 'DaLat' birds in Vietnam?

C
 

James Eaton

Trent Valley Crew
Thankfully Chester Zoo reacted very quickly in response to the paper and managed to locate 3 captive birds that will be used in a captive breeding program to at least keep the survival of the species, I really hope it isn't too late as this really is a really species that will not survive in the wild in the current state.

The Dalat birds are just typical Indochinese M'pies, same as the race in central Vietnam (ie Bach Ma). Birds in northern Vietnam (Cuc Phoung) do show green as opposed to yellow underparts but upperparts differ little and vocally the same.

Cheers,

J
 

chris butterworth

aka The Person Named Above
Thanks James, I wasn't sure of the vocalisations of the Vietnam birds. I'll have to nip down to Chester Zoo and check out whats happening with the Javan birds.

Chris
 

viator

Well-known member
Singapore
Let's hope the Chester Zoo has some success and a miracle happens in Java - sadly I know which is more likely....
 
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