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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Short-term Birding Goals (1 Viewer)

lgonz1008

Well-known member
United States
That's far more expensive even with minimal guiding. I would say no guiding, but Hawaii is well known for having some sites that are restricted access, and you need someone to accompany you if you want to see certain endemics.
Hawaii does something very similar to what Cuba does, which isn't bad from a conservation standpoint, but it also forces and limits birders to go with guides that could potentially by racking up the prices to make a bit more, since who else can you go to so you can see those birds?
 

Patudo

Well-known member
My short-term birding aim is to see as much of the hobbies (Eurasian hobby, Falco subbuteo) nesting near me as I can. The youngsters fledged around the middle of August and by the end of September will leave as the autumn weather sets in.

My notes from 6 September last year end with: "...as I watched the young hobbies weaving and swerving to capture insect after insect, consuming the choiciest parts and discarding the wings and shell-casings that drifted down, transformed by the sunset glow into tiny fragments of gold, into the lake, I could not help thinking that few other sights could better evoke that sense of how beautiful and ephemeral late summer in the south of England can be."
 

kb57

Well-known member
Europe
Yeah unfortunately I can't do an actual tour, as I have to build my trip around a meeting. I'd have no problem birding around Australia if I could use public transit to get everywhere I need to, but that isn't workable for a lot of key sites. I am nervous about driving "on the other side of the road", so apprehensive about renting a vehicle and doing it by myself.
If you live in one of the minority of countries that drive on the left, you end up driving 'on the other side of the road' almost whenever you travel - I can only think of Ireland, Japan and one time in Ladakh, India (which brought its own issues...) when I've been able to drive on the left when traveling.
The switch is really not that bad to get used to, and the fact that the steering wheel position is different helps you to remember what side of the road you should be on. I'd worry more about rules of the road and local driving customs which might vary between USA and Australia.
 

Jos Stratford

Beast from the East
If you live in one of the minority of countries that drive on the left, you end up driving 'on the other side of the road' almost whenever you travel - I can only think of Ireland, Japan and one time in Ladakh, India.
Plus all of eastern and southern Africa, most of south-east Asia (Thailand etc), Australia and New Zealand.

Agree that it isn't actually that difficult in reality - just remember, whether left side or right side, you as driver should be sitting near the middle of the road. If you're by the grass, you're on the wrong side of the road ๐Ÿ˜…
 
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pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Agree with others that the change is not hard. It helps to rent an automatic the first time so you arenโ€™t sitting on the other side of a stick shift that still shifts the same, putting first away and fifth towards you.

A bit of caution and paying attention at your first couple โ€œbackwardsโ€ roundabouts and you adapt very quickly!
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Plus all of eastern and southern Africa, most of south-east Asia (Thailand etc), Australia and New Zealand.

Agree that it isn't actually that difficult in reality - just remember, whether left side or right side, you as driver should be sitting near the middle of the road. If you're by the grass, you're on the wrong side of the road ๐Ÿ˜…
Its much more difficult to remember on a bicycle or motorbike, and I've nearly come unstuck myself wondering why the car coming at me was on the wrong side (he wasn't, I was!)

We had an awful moment in the USA with a car coming at us determinedly as we left the Little Bighorn battlefield, and we were on the correct side of the road - how bad would it have been for a party of Brits to have been wiped out by another party of Brits (which they must have been) driving on the wrong side!

John
 

leonardo_simon

Well-known member
Plus all of eastern and southern Africa, most of south-east Asia (Thailand etc), Australia and New Zealand.

Agree that it isn't actually that difficult in reality - just remember, whether left side or right side, you as driver should be sitting near the middle of the road. If you're by the grass, you're on the wrong side of the road ๐Ÿ˜…
Unless you are driving your own car in another country.
 

ovenbird43

Well-known member
Plus all of eastern and southern Africa, most of south-east Asia (Thailand etc), Australia and New Zealand.

Agree that it isn't actually that difficult in reality - just remember, whether left side or right side, you as driver should be sitting near the middle of the road. If you're by the grass, you're on the wrong side of the road ๐Ÿ˜…
Indeed, I found I adapted surprisingly quickly when I went to South Africa, it's easy to just follow the flow of traffic. The only time I found myself inadvertently driving on the right side was on empty country roads.
 

ovenbird43

Well-known member
I've been very focused on learning and seeking out other nature this summer, particularly Odonates and Lepidopterans, so I suppose my first short-term goal is to refocus a bit on birding and not let fall migration pass me by. I did well on warblers in the spring, but I'd like to get Buff-breasted Sandpiper and American Golden-Plover for the year. I'd love to attract a Rufous or other non Ruby-throated hummingbird to my yard, but other than hoping and watching the feeders, I think that's actually a longer-term project requiring some landscaping work to make my yard more attractive to wintering hummers. I'll likely have the time (and hopefully money) to travel a bit in December, but as of now I don't have any firm plans. Or even vague plans honestly!
 

dandsblair

David and Sarah
Supporter
The 2023 International Congress of Vertebrate Morphology is having their meeting there in July 2023 (was suppose to be 2022...but Covid). It will probably be local birding on my own or with colleagues, along with some guiding. I have been looking at a few guides...Eyes on Wildlife had a 4 day tour that was about the most affordable, although it was still north of $2000.
We have done most birding in Australia (3 long trips) including Cairns and surrounds on our own.
What we did a few times is days out with Birding Pals where we just paid for fuel or bought lunch (it was $10 to register on BirdingPal site), The locals were usually very happy to show some areas for difficult birds and were all really friendly.
 

qwerty5

Well-known member
United States
I just completed my one of my goals yesterday when I picked up 7 shorebird lifers, to give me a total of 11. The only reason I got so many is because of a very nice birder who found and showed me all the shorebirds in his scope. I probably would have gotten 1 or 2 lifers if it hadn't been for him.
 
There's recently been some talk on BF about mostly long-term birding goals and target species. So, I've been thinking, do any of you have short-term birding goals? These would be goals you hope to reach in the next few years, or maybe in the next few months. This could include specific birds you want to find, or any other goals you might have. Mine are:

Reach a total of 200 life birds by the end of 2022. I need 55 species to accomplish this goal, so it might be tough (depending on next year's vacation), but it's pretty realistic I think. In the same time my goal is to reach a total of 10 species of shorebirds and 10 species of waterfowl (Anatidae) by the end of 2022. I currently have 4 of each group, so this goal should be a breeze.

A few of my targets for the next year or so (all would be lifers):
Cerulean Warbler
Summer Tanager
Hooded Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Perhaps more of a medium-term birding goal (money dependent), but would like to chase the last relatively easy-twitchable species to push my country list to probably just north of 730 species - currently sitting on 722.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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