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Shoveler Hybrid? Lunt Liverpool UK (March 2019) (1 Viewer)

Hi all

Was deleting some folders and came across this photo taken in March of this year.

Is it a Shoveler hybrid?
And if so, then any ideas as to which other bird was 'involved'?

cheers
 

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It doesn't have the curly tail feathers of the mallard! I've taken some of the shadows from the photo. Looks more like a shoveler to me!
 

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Jean FRANCOIS

Well-known member
It doesn't have the curly tail feathers of the mallard! I've taken some of the shadows from the photo. Looks more like a shoveler to me!
The profile is not that of the Shoveler.
This bird indeed seems to be intermediate between Mallard and Shoveler as mentioned in the initial message.
I don't know if such a hybrid exists.
Jean
 

johnallcock

Well-known member
I think it's just a domestic mallard - some domestic forms have relatively large bills, especially when the head feathers are wet after feeding (as seems to be the case on this bird). The lack of curly tail feathers is not important - females and young birds don't show this feature.
I don't see any clear evidence of shoveler influence in this bird. Shoveler is quite a short-nnecked, large-headed species, and I'd expect to see more sign of this on a hybrid.
 

fugl

Well-known member
I think it's just a domestic mallard - some domestic forms have relatively large bills, especially when the head feathers are wet after feeding (as seems to be the case on this bird). The lack of curly tail feathers is not important - females and young birds don't show this feature.
I don't see any clear evidence of shoveler influence in this bird. Shoveler is quite a short-nnecked, large-headed species, and I'd expect to see more sign of this on a hybrid.

Agree, barnyard Mallard. . ..
 
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