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Silent film of Minsmere 1955 (1 Viewer)

IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
This is a silent film available to watch in an archive website of old films. This silent film mainly about Minsmere was made in 1955, mainly for educational purposes and this silent film is 53 minutes long.
Ian.
 

Jon Turner

Well-known member
I may have visited Minsmere in 1955 or close to then. My mother had been an RAF radar operator during the war and was for some time posted to the Suffolk coast, where she learned about Minsmere. She married in 1948 or 9 and my Dad was also interested and took us two boys to stay in the old tennis hut above Minsmere. Oddly I can recall being introduced to the boom of a Bittern!
 

IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
I visited Minsmere when i first joined the RSPB in 1973. Are there any RSPB members like myself from 1973 or earlier than me as members remember when you had to apply for permits at the latest 6 months ahead of your visit to lots of RSPB reserves of which where only open a few days a week. And even some of those RSPB reserves where no permits where needed where only open a few days a week as well. I was successful in getting a permit for Minsmere in 1973. But another RSPB reserve where i applied for a permit in Wales called YNYS-HIR had no permits left on the day that i wanted to visit and i had to apply for another day as YNYS-HIR was only open 3 days a week. Can other RSPB member from the 1970’s or earlier than myself remember that period as an RSPB member?
Ian.
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
Yes, both as a Y.O.C. and subsequently RSPB member. I still have my welcome pack, code and card as a 12 year old from 1967. My first visit to Minsmere was around '68... we just walked in from the beach. I recall the warden Herbert Axell talking to us after I proudly showed him my card. As an aside sadly I mislaid my Tingha and Tucker membership card, boomerang and letter from Aunty Jean. Happy Days.
 

SlowLowFlyingTurkey

Well-known member
I didn't join the RSPB until the 80s but in the 70s I, and a couple of friends from primary school, were members of a local Field Club that used to run nature film nights and coach trips to various reserves around East Anglia, including at least one to Minsmere in the 70s that I remember well. I wasn't aware of any permits at the time so presumably they were organised by the club. I always remember the distinctive paper ID charts that seemed to be pinned up in every hide back then.

Even as recently as the 80s I remember the little information hut and sightings board on the beach at the end of the north wall, and the car park was located under the Sand Martin colony.
 

IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
I didn't join the RSPB until the 80s but in the 70s I, and a couple of friends from primary school, were members of a local Field Club that used to run nature film nights and coach trips to various reserves around East Anglia, including at least one to Minsmere in the 70s that I remember well. I wasn't aware of any permits at the time so presumably they were organised by the club. I always remember the distinctive paper ID charts that seemed to be pinned up in every hide back then.

Even as recently as the 80s I remember the little information hut and sightings board on the beach at the end of the north wall, and the car park was located under the Sand Martin colony.
This is an article about Minsmere from 2018, but updated recently in January of this year and near the end of this article mentions about permits and certain days closed as well.
 

IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
And here is the details of visiting Leighton Moss. It all changed in the first few years of the 1980’s when a few lines simply said in the RSPB Birds magazine. that the council of the RSPB have decided that most of the RSPB reserves will be open 7 days a week with longer opening hours and nothing else and those few lines could have been easily missed. And that was in the Birds magazine. Nothing else just those few lines in the RSPB magazine. There where still some RSPB reserves where no permits where needed and open 7 days a week, but also some RSPB reserves where no permit was needed but only open a few days a week such as Insh Marshes up in Scotland and only open 4 days a week. E86BF930-42E0-4FD1-8976-6228098213C5.jpeg
 
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kb57

Well-known member
Europe
I remember needing to get permits for Leighton Moss in the early 70s...I visited Minsmere for the first time on 31 July 1972 on an organised trip, which would've been organised in advance. Unfortunately my obsessively tidy mother threw out all my field notes after I left home, but I still have my year list book - curlew sandpiper, wood sandpiper, gadwall and marsh harrier were additions that day, nos. 168-171. Gadwall were really not that common in NE England compared to now, I think I was quite excited to see one.
 

IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
The above is a book by Bert Axell and Eric Hosking from the 1970’s direct from the RSPB either straight away on publication day of this book or I ordered in advance before the publication of the book called: Minsmere Portrait of a Bird Reserve. I had a surprise when I ordered this book when the book I ordered had Bert Axell’s and Eric Hosking’s signatures. This book can often be bought bought on Amazon and Ebay as well as numerous online second hand book shops as this book is now long out of print. Also at Minsmere in 1971 Herons started nesting in Minsmeres reedbeds, which is not unheard off as shown in one of the pages in my book as shown above, but not as common as Herons nesting in trees and I saw that small Heronry on my one and only visit to Minsmere in the 1970’s. Sadly that Heronry is not at Minsmere now. Did anyone on Birdforum buy this book like myself during the 1970’s.
Ian.
 
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IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
I have a copy of that book but I didn't buy it in the 70s. Got it a couple of years ago, as well as this Minsmere book by Simon Barnes:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Flying-Fac...ywords=minsmere&qid=1615800054&s=books&sr=1-1

I think I got one second hand from Amazon and one from (possibly) the second hand books for sale at Paxton Pits, Cambs. I forget which was which though.
Thanks for that information about the book by Simon Barnes! I’ve just ordered that book! 🙂🙂
Ian.
 

IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
CDC5A7F4-9173-424A-866D-4853A6F3F4CC.jpeg 04A8D52E-CE45-4EBC-9DD6-664B54F93581.jpeg
This is another book i bought in the year that this book was first published in 1979 and this book called The Scottish Ospreys from extinction to survival by Philip Brown with a foreward by George Waterston and again this book can be bought in various places such as Amazon and Ebay as well as World of Books.
Ian
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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