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Small binoculars : Nikon M7 8*30 vs Zeiss Terra Pocket 8*25... or something else (1 Viewer)

b-lilja

Well-known member
An outsider's choice but the Nikon Mountaineer 8x25 II's on ebay right now, new old stock, are pretty incredible for the money...everything the Travelite could be when Nikon decided to go all in. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Bino...562104&hash=item48a6d2fdea:g:4JoAAOSw9KhaCZuv
Chunky as hell and a great balanced view. The extra weight actually helps stabilize them. I bought a pair, received them, and turned right around and bought another for my brother. I have yet to look through a pair of the 8x25 Victory's and will probably buy a pair, guessing they will have more pop...but for 15% of the price...

Just had them on vacation along with my 8x32 Conquest HD's...while the Zeiss are better, the Nikons stood up and I reached for them quite a bit...
 
Many thanks for your advice.

Paddy7, your odd eye position is still strange for me ! I cannot move the head and keep a decent view... Perhaps with some training.

B-Lilja, I can't find this model in my area and does not appear on France's Nikon website.

Alexis, thanks for these explanations about veiling glare ! II will try to look at some other samples, because in the first sample I tested, I don't remember dealing with such a glare. This crescent shaped veiling glare is here without any special conditions.

Girafenaine
 

paddy7

Well-known member
I've just checked to see how i do this - and i only do it with bins with 30mm or less objectives.
The elbows are quite close to my side, so the forearm is close to vertical. This provides a 'frame' in which the binocular is central, in front of my eyes.
Panning in this way is more a movement from the waist than moving the head, keeping the frame in place, and not moving the arms.
Personally, i have no problem with it, although that was not the case when i started doing it!
I think it was the M7 that started it. There had been much talk on the Forum of 'veiling glare' and blackouts, and i experimented for a few days in how to get the max field of view, avoid any problems with whether eyecups were sufficient for the eye relief etc.
It is now completely natural, and doesn't affect my use of larger binoculars, which is perhaps more 'normal'!
As i said - it's not for everyone, and the first time i mentioned it i received one or two ribald comments; still, it works for me, and it's become fairly instinctive now.
 

StephenHampshire

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I've just checked to see how i do this - and i only do it with bins with 30mm or less objectives.
The elbows are quite close to my side, so the forearm is close to vertical. This provides a 'frame' in which the binocular is central, in front of my eyes.
Panning in this way is more a movement from the waist than moving the head, keeping the frame in place, and not moving the arms.
Personally, i have no problem with it, although that was not the case when i started doing it!
I think it was the M7 that started it. There had been much talk on the Forum of 'veiling glare' and blackouts, and i experimented for a few days in how to get the max field of view, avoid any problems with whether eyecups were sufficient for the eye relief etc.
It is now completely natural, and doesn't affect my use of larger binoculars, which is perhaps more 'normal'!
As i said - it's not for everyone, and the first time i mentioned it i received one or two ribald comments; still, it works for me, and it's become fairly instinctive now.

You have just described the standard photographic technique for panning - swivel from the waste from about - 60 degrees to about plus 60 degrees, keeping the subject centre frame. Works with trains!
 

paddy7

Well-known member
What a shame - i thought i'd invented it!
Actually, without being too mystical about it, i developed it from having done around 18 years of Tai Chi. I just tried it again, and realised i tilt from the waist/lower back too. It does present quite a slender and narrow silhouette when birding at close distance too - no sticking-out of elbows etc. There are no erratic movements in it.
 

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