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snowy owl irruption (1 Viewer)

captaincarot

Well-known member
Do you think this will cause a few more to visit Scotland too? :)

Nige

i'm guessing that these birds would be coming from the canadian and alaskan arcitc, where as scottish vagrants would come from the scandinavian arctic. but i could easily be wrong
 

Jos Stratford

Beast from the East
i'm guessing that these birds would be coming from the canadian and alaskan arcitc, where as scottish vagrants would come from the scandinavian arctic. but i could easily be wrong

You would be completely correct, Snowy Owls are also far more numerous in the northern States than they ever are in Scandinavia, so even a 'poor' year over will notch up the owls ...saw six in December/January two winters back without much effort.
 

puttgrass

half-hardy
This is a significant irruption, not only in "Minnesota, Michigan, and North and South Dakota" which typically host at least a few Snowy Owls every winter, but owls are being seen south into Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Illinois, Wyoming, and Kansas. I cannot blame the madison.com article for being somewhat Wisconsin-centric, though. ;) See also here and here.
 

Larry Lade

Moderator
Two Snowy Owls are currently being reported from Smithville Lake, Smithville, Missouri. This is just 40 miles south of where I live in Saint Joseph, Missouri. I am hoping to get down there to see at least one of them if not both!!
 

Lisa W

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Two Snowy Owls are currently being reported from Smithville Lake, Smithville, Missouri. This is just 40 miles south of where I live in Saint Joseph, Missouri. I am hoping to get down there to see at least one of them if not both!!

I hope you make it down there, Larry. Can't wait to retire and hit the northern states looking for these.
 

bkrownd

Well-known member
This is a significant irruption, not only in "Minnesota, Michigan, and North and South Dakota" which typically host at least a few Snowy Owls every winter, but owls are being seen south into Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Illinois, Wyoming, and Kansas. I cannot blame the madison.com article for being somewhat Wisconsin-centric, though. ;) See also here and here.


One was also shot at the honolulu airport last month.
 
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lashinala

Well-known member
Was the one at HNL ship aided or aircraft aided (or does anyone know)? I know they've been spotted in Bermuda so just wondered.
 

bkrownd

Well-known member
No reason to believe it didn't fly to honolulu, and the timing is right. The bird was starved, and had not been seen before. Someone would have noticed a bird like that.
 

NatureLvrCanada

Well-known member
No reason to believe it didn't fly to honolulu, and the timing is right. The bird was starved, and had not been seen before. Someone would have noticed a bird like that.
Is that even possible? The mainland is about 2,000 miles away. Don't owls like to hug the shoreline during migration to avoid flying over large expanses of water?
 

Reuven_M

Well-known member
Is that even possible? The mainland is about 2,000 miles away. Don't owls like to hug the shoreline during migration to avoid flying over large expanses of water?

Short-eareds often fly over water, and there's a record of snowy from bermuda and a number from britain.
 

chris butterworth

aka The Person Named Above
Hawai'i has a record of a Golden Eagle ( killed while dive bombing a helicopter, if I'm not wrong!!!! ) so a Snowy Owl could, just, make it over the water IMO.

Chris
 

lashinala

Well-known member
Could, yeah. Just seems to me ship/aircraft aided would be more direct solution (Occam's razor).
 

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