• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

So is the Canon R5 a bird photography body? (2 Viewers)

colincurry

Well-known member
Found this link comparing the RF100-500 and EF 100-400 mk2 which provides food for thought. Again, this combo is being used with the R5 and not R6, although the latter does get a mention. Unfortunately, the review does not include the 10-400 mk2 with a 1.4 tc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1748&v=0MH34YAWGek&feature=emb_logo

I note that Panamoz has various RF bundles, and that HDEW also has the R5 and R6 with EF-RF converter in stock.

Colin
 

MJN

Well-known member
As far as i can find out its always 20 until you have less than 60-65% battery.

Thanks for that Les.
It'll be mainly mechanical shutter for me then, which I believe is very quiet.
I could soon lose the will to live just trawling through one 3 or 4 second burst of frames taken at that rate.
Mike.
 

MJN

Well-known member
I've not seen anything in the menus for adjusting it down, other than as said, a lack of power.

Here's a link to the manual online, for anyone interested in delving into the finer details of the camera.

https://cam.start.canon/en/C003/manual/html/index.html

Thanks for the link Pete.
20fps and no control over it. Also a considerably long list of caveats when using electronic shutter.
Not a show stopper but as previously stated, mechanical shutter it will be (when I ever get my hands on it). Well mostly anyway.
 

Duck_Pond

Professional Wildlife Photographer
I've been mainly using the electronic shutter, but then again, I have been testing it on fast moving birds, like hobbies and the little owls as they run and fly. The additional shots are a benefit here, as the action is happening very quickly, and always changing.

I have created a menu on the camera that I can access items such as battery info, format card and shutter mode quickly, so can change from electronic to one of the other modes if I need to. But for stationary subjects, I just tap the shutter release button, and it'll take 3-4 images.
 

Duck_Pond

Professional Wildlife Photographer
You could always wait for the 1DR or whatever it will be named to appear, possibly late next year. "Canon Rumors" have already started to post snippets about the pro-bodied mirrorless camera from Canon. Might offer more control over modes, as Canon themselves hone the technologies they're having to employ now.
 

Dave Williams

Well-known member
You could always wait for the 1DR or whatever it will be named to appear, possibly late next year. "Canon Rumors" have already started to post snippets about the pro-bodied mirrorless camera from Canon. Might offer more control over modes, as Canon themselves hone the technologies they're having to employ now.

That is an interesting idea, and one I'd considered. Has to be a lightweight body but happy for a larger size too. I guess it would come at a pretty hefty price tag too.
Currently there isn't too much panic from my point of view to get my hands on a new camera body as Covid lockdowns will give fewer and fewer opportunities to use it!!
Meantime do keep us informed of your impressions ( and all you other users too please!) , I'm looking forward to hearing more about the R6 too. Might be a short term less expensive solution and later become a back up for a "1DR"
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
You could always wait for the 1DR or whatever it will be named to appear, possibly late next year. "Canon Rumors" have already started to post snippets about the pro-bodied mirrorless camera from Canon. Might offer more control over modes, as Canon themselves hone the technologies they're having to employ now.

1DR will be interesting - but what on earth native fast long lenses are they going to have to compliment it ?? (I'm discounting rumours of an RF 500mm f2.8 lens - I can't see a ~4.5kg++ lens setting the world alight for the walkaround birder ! :eek!: )

Perhaps if Sony comes out with a rumoured 'Pro' model even more capable, ergonomic, and robust than the A9II - it might be game over considering their native mirrorless fast long light lenses already available ! :eek!: Goodness only knows how Nikon is going to match that lot .........






Chosun :gh:
 

MJN

Well-known member
It's good to know that your Ok with the electronic shutter Pete.
I've never experienced one so don't really know what to expect, perhaps it's fixed at 20fps as a mitigation of rolling shutter effect, I don't know though!
I've already ordered the R5 and It's on order from a local retailer so the way things are going it may even end up as a late Christmas present to myself but I'm in no hurry.
The future R1 is not something that I would be interested in as I'm guessing it would probably come in at £6000+ when a couple of cards and spare battery are in the mix.
Has anyone entered the world of HEIF yet and what are your thoughts?
 

Duck_Pond

Professional Wildlife Photographer
The electronic shutter minimises the stuttering effect that is seen through the viewfinder too. That is most apparent on the mechanical shutter mode. I have read that there is a mode (greyed out currently) that improves the view but only when an RF lens is attached. Perhaps another nudge at getting the 100-500mm lens.

This is my first mirrorless camera too, and it's all a bit of a learning curve. But the results coming from it are so impressive (IMHO) that any learning is well worth it.

I really must run down the battery to see what effect that has on functionality. And perhaps find something other than little owls to test it on...
 

colincurry

Well-known member
Here is a link to an actual bird photographer's review of the R6 whilst awaiting the delivery of an R5. He used a variety of EF lenses, the shortest of which was the 100-400 mk2. He also used a 1.4 tc. I cannot see which lens was used for which photo.

The review makes interesting reading. He was concerned about cropping with R6 and mentioned the need to get closer to the subject - despite his use of long lenses and the tc.

His decision on the R5 in his final paragraph provides food for thought.

Colin

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64414772
 

Roy C

Occasional bird snapper
Here is a link to an actual bird photographer's review of the R6 whilst awaiting the delivery of an R5. He used a variety of EF lenses, the shortest of which was the 100-400 mk2. He also used a 1.4 tc. I cannot see which lens was used for which photo.

The review makes interesting reading. He was concerned about cropping with R6 and mentioned the need to get closer to the subject - despite his use of long lenses and the tc.

His decision on the R5 in his final paragraph provides food for thought.

Colin

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64414772
Yes, when you crop the R6 to the same FOV as the 7d2 you are left with just 7.8 mp's, no room for cropping much more that's for sure. As I most always crop even the 7d2 shots then I am leaning towards the R5 at this time (unless one of the new f11 lenses turn out to be any good).
It would be good to know how the IQ and focus speed pans out on the R6 with the 100-400 MkII + a 1.4x tc though.
 
Last edited:

MJN

Well-known member
For bird photography the only reason you would opt for an R6 over an R5 is Cost.
The additional cost of the R5 is significant and also includes extra storage, possible PC upgrade and CF Express costs.
I originally decided on an R6 but an unexpected windfall enabled an upgrade, which will arrive one day! I currently use a 1Dx2 and a 5DSR, my idea was get an R6 and sell the 1DX2. I now intend to get an R5 and sell the 5DSR.
The cropping power of the 45MP will be huge and something I really benefit from when photographing small birds with a 50MP camera, it can't be understated.
Interesting to see that the chap reviewing the R6 in Colins link was not too upbeat about the 20fps with regard to rolling shutter, more concerning was the lazy wake up time which I would assume applies to the R5 as well.
There are some interesting times ahead and I'm just pleased that I stuck with Canon after considering changing brand a short time ago.
 

Duck_Pond

Professional Wildlife Photographer
Interesting article. I've not seen issues with the rolling shutter yet, but perhaps the little owls don't move bits quickly enough to see it, and the hobbies were too far off to be affected. I noted the other day when a police helicopter was flying around behind my house, and I took some shots with the electronic shutter, the rotor blades were fine, but it was a big crop, so it must only manifest itself when the subject is a frame-filler, which figures, from my understanding of the issue.

The wake-up time is a bit of an issue, but I've already started to work around it, by compensating for the time it takes to come back to life, by pressing buttons on it before it's anywhere near my head, so it has activated by the time I am looking through it.

As far as I know, the viewfinder in the R5 is of a higher resolution to that of the R6, so perhaps that explains one of the issues he mentions in that review. The R5 also has a mode whereby the viewfinder can run at a faster refresh rate (uses more power) so fast-moving objects appear more smoothly.

Sadly lacking in hummingbirds here in the Midlands to test it on. Not lacking in rain at the moment alas...
 

Users who are viewing this thread

  • MJN
Top