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So, is there no such thing as binocular "screen protectors"? (1 Viewer)

Tired

Well-known member
United States
I have a screen protector on my phone. It's a thin layer of some sort of glass, with a film so it won't shatter into dangerous pieces when it breaks. I've had to replace it several times, and otherwise would have had to replace the phone screen.

My camera has a screw-on lens cover. It's completely transparent to my eye, and screws on in front of the lens, with a bit of clearance between the lens and the guard. It means I don't have to worry too much about damaging the lens.

Is there no similar product for binoculars? I see people talking about the difficulty of cleaning lenses without scratching them, and it seems like the easiest way to avoid that would be to have something over them. Maybe something a bit harder to scratch. And if it did scratch, it could be replaced. Is there some reason why that wouldn't work?
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
It is another layer of material that most likely would negate many of the desired effects of multi coated front objective lens that have been produced to offer the best image in their manufacture - guess like putting some cling film on your spectacles. That's why they come with front covers and a protective case.

Note ; your phone screen protector covers the camera lens? Nope.
 

jring

Well-known member
Hi,

for the few models of bins with filter threads, you could install UV filters for protection, as is commonly done for photo lenses (after the transformation to digital sensors, there is no need for a UV filter any more)...

In general those filters need to be polished to a high standard and multicoated to not degrade the image.

Joachim
 

Jonno52

John (a bad birdwatcher)
Supporter
United Kingdom
I clean bins (when cleaning seems necessary) by first using a good quality blower (there are some rubbish ones, this is OK) to remove any particulate debris, then a photographic brush, and finally breathing lightly on the lens and gently wiping it while the condensation remains with a decent microfibre cloth. I've been through a few bins and camera lenses since starting birding in 1979, and have never once scratched a lens. I wouldn't want any sort of "screen protector" because, as has been mentioned, it would probably degrade the image.
 

sillyak

Well-known member
Not neccessary and it would reduce performance. Once you learn how to properly clean a lens there is nothing to worry about.

I do not use a filter on my photo lenses either. It degrades performance and cleaning a lens once a year or so is no big deal. My camera lenses and binoculars look like new.
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
The front glass of the Canon 10x42ISL is a simple glass flat, which protects the actual objective lens. This may have been necessary for Canon to be able to waterproof the glass, as the optics inside move. Still, clearly it is quite possible to design binoculars with a safety glass.
That said, adding another bit of glass will impact the optical performance, plus there can be unwanted side effects, such as condensation between the glass and the objectives. Use a lens hood instead, it provides better protection without any optical penalty.
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
Use a lens hood instead, it provides better protection without any optical penalty.
Never seen such a fixing out in the field, nor come across anything suitable that wasn't flimsy, for a binocular. Not many general purpose models are produced that can take screw in filters / lenses - it's just not a requirement.
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
Never seen such a fixing out in the field, nor come across anything suitable that wasn't flimsy, for a binocular. Not many general purpose models are produced that can take screw in filters / lenses - it's just not a requirement.
The Canon 10x42ISL is fitted for screw threads for 52mm filters and hoods.
I use an aluminum hood which blends almost perfectly with this glass. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009GFY6EG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1)
It further improves the superlative stray light rejection this glass provides.
 

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