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Some “challenges” from the Bird Migration on Merchant Ships 9 minute film clip in the Migration Forum. (1 Viewer)

KenM

Well-known member
Having watched the clip many times, it would be good to get some answers on some of the birds shown.

The Wheatear at 1.36 (a grey backed Black-eared?)

The Song Thrush at 2.13 (striking face pattern and a grey rump)

The sp passerine at 2.21.

The falcon sp at 3.00 (Saker?)

The “seemingly” incredibly long-legged Citrine Wag. at 4.19.

The RBFlycatcher at 5.13. (red tint to the flanks??)

Olive-tree Warbler at 6.15?

If it’s a Linnet at 7.52 looks a bit odd to my eye?

Greenfinch and sp at 8.11. and a Bunting sp...Cirl at 8.14?

Cheers
 

mummymonkey

Well-known member
Supporter
United Kingdom
The Wheatear at 1.36 - thought desert
The sp passerine at 2.21 - doesn't seem to be in focus but an accentor?
sp at 8.11 , Bunting sp...Cirl at 8.14 - thought yellowhammer tbh
 

Alexander Stöhr

Well-known member
Agree with Mummymonkey that the Bunting at 8:14 is a Yellowhammer:
wrong head pattern for Cirl, but it is good, really spot on for Yellowhammer and the warm brown rump with a slight rufous tinge is just visible.
The Bunting that is chased by a Greenfinch at 8:11. seems a slightly odd Yellowhammer to me, but I think a slight pink/flesh lower mandible is just visible. It is no Ortolan Bunting or Corn Bunting with such an obvious yellow wing-panel and strong pale tramlines on the back(to prominent for Corn Bunting, wich at best has subdued ones or lacking them alltogether), but I better wait for for others or when seeing the video at Full HD (I cant do this with this computer)
 
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Alexander Stöhr

Well-known member
Agree with Mummymonkey, that the unsharp bird at 2:21 looks like a Dunnock. Not a sure ID, but if seen this bird in Germany, I would make a quick jizz-id of a common bird, as nothing seems wrong for a common species.
 

Alexander Stöhr

Well-known member
The RB-Flycatcher and the Linnet looks ok for me, I assume that bright sunlight together wit a sensor that cant cope with the high contrast, exaggerate the white rump and wing panel here.
 

KenM

Well-known member
Have viewed the film clip on a monitor for the first time, with the colours not quite as concentrated as on the camera phone, that said I now tend to agree with the suggestions made albeit the Desert Wheatear does look grey on the upper-parts to my eye, probably within variance for the species?

On the monitor the Yellowhammer now looks less yellow but looks better for the species, the Song Thrush with grey nape/rump and strong contrasting face pattern is not what I'm used to in the UK.....a N.East returning (Spring) bird perhaps to Siberia?

Having looked again at the Red-breasted Flycatcher, I can see a red tint to the flanks when the wings are raised and don't think it's a secondary reflection from any surrounding superstructure...perhaps interesting?

As for the Falcon sp being a Marsh Harrier I'll reserve judgement, hoping everyone that viewed the ''clip'' was suitably impressed, cos I was!

Cheers (y)
 

dantheman

Bah humbug
Have viewed the film clip on a monitor for the first time, with the colours not quite as concentrated as on the camera phone, that said I now tend to agree with the suggestions made albeit the Desert Wheatear does look grey on the upper-parts to my eye, probably within variance for the species?

On the monitor the Yellowhammer now looks less yellow but looks better for the species, the Song Thrush with grey nape/rump and strong contrasting face pattern is not what I'm used to in the UK.....a N.East returning (Spring) bird perhaps to Siberia?

Having looked again at the Red-breasted Flycatcher, I can see a red tint to the flanks when the wings are raised and don't think it's a secondary reflection from any surrounding superstructure...perhaps interesting?

As for the Falcon sp being a Marsh Harrier I'll reserve judgement, hoping everyone that viewed the ''clip'' was suitably impressed, cos I was!
Looking at the previous two birds around 5:00, they both have red-tinted underparts, as does part of the white painted steelwork - reflection up from the red painted deck.

The purported falcon on the railings at 3:00 exactly - perhaps indeed Marsh Harrier (although initially too thought it was a smaller falcon eg RF), followed by single Marsh Harrier, then a flock of Marsh? (I want them to be Black Kite though!)

The link -

 
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Bubbs

Well-known member
On the opening sequence we see five birds flying towards the ship. Presumably four of these are Night Herons but what is the fifth black and white bird on the right?
 

Alexander Stöhr

Well-known member
Agree with Mummymonkey that the Bunting at 8:14 is a Yellowhammer:
wrong head pattern for Cirl, but it is good, really spot on for Yellowhammer and the warm brown rump with a slight rufous tinge is just visible.
The Bunting that is chased by a Greenfinch at 8:11. seems a slightly odd Yellowhammer to me, but I think a slight pink/flesh lower mandible is just visible. It is no Ortolan Bunting or Corn Bunting with such an obvious yellow wing-panel and strong pale tramlines on the back(to prominent for Corn Bunting, wich at best has subdued ones or lacking them alltogether), but I better wait for for others or when seeing the video at Full HD (I cant do this with this computer)

Having looked the video again at Full HD (what a difference for judging the head-pattern), the Bunting at 8:11 is indeed a Yellowhammer imo, evrything is there. It has just a slight uniformer head-pattern than "ID-book" YH.
 

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