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Some tricky Edwards's and/or Edward's Birds … Part II (1 Viewer)

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
Now let´s deal with the Birds themselves – the Edwards's Birds!

After having been focused too long (See earlier thread, here on the mere spelling of the names of the possible men behind those birds it´s about time we put our efforts into solving the commemorations of the Birds involved.

The three Birds that I´ve been talking about, and we´ve been dealing with, this far, is:
● Edwards's Fig-Parrot Psittaculirostris edwardsii OUSTALET 1885 …
● Edwards's Pheasant Lophura edwardsi OUSTALET 1896 …
● and the sub-specie "Edward's Lorikeet" (most often, on Caged birds) used on both (!?); Trichoglossus (haematodus) capistratus BECHSTEIN 1811 and T. (h.) capistratus fortis HARTERT 1898 …

And the question is still: Who do they commemorate? Do we really know which "Edwards" is behind these birds? Who´s who in edwardsii respective edwardsi?

Let´s start with the first bird in that short list; the Fig-Parrot …

Anyone knows?

PS. The type description of the Fig-parrot was published in: Oustalet, E. 1885. Note sur une Perroquet & sur une Pigeon Goura de la Cote Septentrionale de la Nouvelle-Guinée. Annales Des Sciences Naturelles — Zoologi/ Annales Des Sciences Naturelles — Zoologi et Paléontologie comprenant l’Anatomi, la Physiologie. La Classification et l’histoire des Animaux (Sixième Série) 19 (No. 3): 1-4 (Attached). Link to full volume: here. Also check out the first pages in this Annales Des Sciences Naturelles (in No. 1) for this year.
 

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Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Dear Björn,

Alphonse Milne-Edwards (october 13th, 1835 till april 21st 1900) is perhaps best known for his work on fossil birds, he has named many fossil birds and is often called "the father of bird paleontology (paleornithology)" and many species are dedicated to him (I will only mention those that are still believed to be valid, many others have fallen into synonymy):

Cygnopterus alphonsi Cheneval, 1984, an Anatidae
Grallavis edwardsi (Lydekker, 1891), a Ciconiidae
Mesembriornis milneedwardsi Moreno, 1889, a Phorusrhacidae
"Totanus" edwardsi Gaillard, 1908, Scolopacidae
Sternalara milneedwardsi De Pietri, Costeur, Güntert et G. Mayr, 2011, Superfamily LAROIDEA, family Incertae Sedis, possibly near Laridae
Sterna milneedwardsii Riabinin, 1931. a Laridae
Parasarcoramphus milneedwardsi Mourer-Chauviré, 2002, a Cathartidae
Hieraaetus edwardsi (Sharpe, 1899), an Accipitridae
Necrobyas edwardsi Gaillard, 1939, a Strigiformes, Tytonidae
Strix edwardsi (Ennouchi, 1930), a Strigidae
Geranopterus milneedwardsi G. Mayr et Mourer-Chauviré, 2000, a Ciconiiformes, Geranopteridae

His most important works are:

Alphonse Milne-Edwards, 1863: Sur la Distribution Géologique des Oiseaux Fossiles et Description de Quelques Espèces Nouvelles: Comptes Rendus Hebdomadaires des Séances de l'Académie des Sciences (Paris) 56: 1219-1222

Alphonse Milne-Edwards, 1867-1868: Recherches Anatomiques et Paléontologiques pour servir a l'Histoire des Oiseaux Fossiles de la France: Paris, Victor Masson et Fils, tomé 1; + Atlas

Alphonse Milne-Edwards, 1869-1871: Recherches Anatomiques et Paléontologiques pour servir a l'Histoire des Oiseaux Fossiles de la France: Paris, Victor Masson et Fils, tomé 2; + Atlas

Alphonse Milne-Edwards, 1892: Sur les Oiseaux Fossiles de Dêpots Éocène de Phosphate de Chaux de Sud de la France : Comptes Rendus du second Congrès Ornithologique International Budapest, p. 60-80

And he wrote many papers on the fauna of Madagascar, Rodrigues and so on.

His knowledge of birdspecies was legendary


Fred Ruhe
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
Great list, Fred!

Many thanks for that long additional list of prehistoric birds, named after the same person. It clearly shows how (more or less) different scientific names still can point in the same direction ...

On top of that, in Sweden we use the name "Milne-Edwards Coua" for the Coua primaeva (in English Ancient coua), commemorating the same man: Alphonse Milne-Edwards (1835–1900), as he was the one (together with Alfred Grandidier) who decribed that species in 1895.

But what about the Fig-Parrot Psittaculirostris edwardsii ... anyone know?
 
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Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
I´ll keep going ...

The first page of the Type description of Edwards's Fig-parrot (see post # 1, this thread) has two references to articles by Oustalet himself – those are (in full):
Oustalet, É. 1880. Description de quelques oiseaux nouveaux de la Nouvelle-Guinée. Bulletin Hebdomadaire de l'Association Scientifique de France (Serie 2) 1: 171-173. (Attached in the thread on "Tommaso Salvadori …", in Post Nr. #9 ... or here)
Oustalet, É. 1883 (1882). Note sur Quelques Oiseaux de la Nouvelle-Guinée. Annales des Sciences Naturelles; Zoologie et Paleontologie, comprenat l'Anatomie, la Physiologie, la Classification et l'Histoire Naturelles des Animaux ( Serie 6, tome 13): 9-12. (here)

I don´t think they, or the type description itself, point in either direction of neither Henri Milne Edwards nor Alphonse Milne-Edwards, more than that also this Fig-parrot, just like "Cyclopsittacus Salvadorii", ended up in Muséum d'Histoire naturelle de Paris (where I think both the two "Milne-Edwards's" worked, or at least had worked, at that time!).

But it is hard to tell … without knowing any French!?

If anyone who does know French feel like checking the type description (as well as those two references) for any connection whatsover to either Henri Milne Edwards or Alphonse Milne-Edwards I would surely be grateful.

Or does anybody, before we dig any further, already know who the Fig-parrot Psittaculirostris edwardsii commemorate ?
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
Ok, no suggestions, and I will try to push on. Thereby I will suggest the following:

● Edwards's Fig-Parrot Psittaculirostris edwardsii OUSTALET 1885
… commemorate either Henri Milne Edwards (1800-1885) or his son Alphonse Milne-Edwards (1835-1900), both connected to the Natural History Museum Jardin des Plantes/Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris.

Since there is no clear dedication, in the type description, I think this assumption is fair. It might be named after either one of them. Either Professor Alphonse Milne-Edwards or his (at that time as well-known) father Henri Milne Edwards, that died the same year when the Fig-Parrot got its name. The latter was greatly missed, his Obituary was written by four of the foremost Scientists, of various fields, earlier the same year, in the same journal, as the Fig-Parrot appeared.

Anyone think otherwise? Or knows anything that proves me wrong?

PS. Some little chronology: Henri Milne Edwards was Professor in Zoology at the same Museum from 1862, succeeded by his son Alphonse Milne-Edwards in 1876. After the Death of Alphonse Milne-Edwards in 1900, the nine year younger, Émile Oustalet (1844–1905) was the one who took over the chair and the professorship, of both his famous precursor's, at the same museum.
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
More knowledge of French needed

While I´m still craving for the attention of our French readers ...

What about the commemoration of:
● Edwards's Pheasant Lophura edwardsi OUSTALET 1896 … described in: Oustalet, E. 1896. Description de cinq espèces nouvelles d’Oiseauc appertenant au Muséum d’histoire naturelle et provenant de la Chine et de l’Indo-Chine. Bulletin du Museum D’Histoire Naturelle, Paris. 2: 314-317. (attached)

Does this French text reveal anything why this Pheasant was named edwardsi?

Cheers!
 

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8669

Well-known member
No, not for this one.

Cryptolopha dejeani is named after P. Dejaen, a missionary at Tatsien-lou (Setchouan) and Arboricola henrici after Henri d'Orléans, who donated the bird to the museum.

Nothing is said about the naming of Gennaeus edwardsi.

Theo
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
Thanks Theo!

As Edwards's Pheasant was described in Bulletin du Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle 1896, when Alphonse Milne-Edwards was "Directeur du Muséum", in charge of the whole thing, responsible for both the Muséum and its Bulletin, I think it´s fair to assume (even without a clear dedication) that the Pheasant was named after him. His his father, his predecessor in the same chair (Henri Milne Edwards) had, at that time, been dead for elven years.

This would give us the following commemoration:
● Edwards's Pheasant Lophura edwardsi OUSTALET 1896 … most likely Alphonse Milne-Edwards (1835-1900).

Also see earlier thread (here), post No. #2 by "mb1848" …

Anyone of a different view?

------------------------------

And then there´s only one left (of the three birds starting this long issue) … the Lorikeet.
● the sub-specie called "Edward's Lorikeet" (most often, on Caged birds) used on both (!?); Trichoglossus (haematodus) capistratus BECHSTEIN 1811 and T. (h.) capistratus fortis HARTERT 1898.

Why was this bird called "Edward's Lorikeet"?

Also see the same thread as above, post No. #4, also by "mb1848" …

PS. Note that this lorikeet earlier also have been called "Edwards's Lory"!?
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
Continuation ...

I think that the Common name "Edward's Lorikeet" have been used on both capistratus and fortis (especially on Caged Birds) due to mere negligence of the species - vs sub-species level.

Something like when we (European) birdwatchers spot, for example a Redshank Tringa totanus or a Dunlin Calidris alpina and don´t always separate (or call) them (for various reasons, we might not even be able to!) regarding their affiliation/sub-species rank; "Common Redshank" Tringa totanus totanus vs "Islandic Redshank" T. t. robusta respectively "North-European Dunlin" C. a. alpina vs "Southern Dunlin" C. a. schinzii. We often just note them as a "Redshank" respectively a "Dunlin".

It´s far from rare, both among ornithologists and aviculturists, that the sub-species level is left out whenever talking of what type of birds they have experienced or have in their care.

I think the so called "Edward's Lorikeet" simply has its Origin in "Edwards's Lory", at the start used for the very complex Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus LINNAEUS 1771 (earlier a k a "Rainbow Lory") a species full of nuances (loads of sub-species, at least 20!) and then by an unfortunate typo (as "Edward's Lory") later applied, and adhered, to some of its various forms. See attached pp. from: A Monograph of the lories, or Brush-tongued Parrots, composing the family Loriidæ by St. George Mivart 1885.

The first reference in Linnaeus' type description of haematodus (as "hæmatod." [sic] – in his Mantissa Plantarum altera 1771) was "Edw. av. 45. t. 232" ... equivalent of; "The red-breasted Parrakeet/La Perruche à Estomach Rouge" on pp. 45(-46), Plate 232 (attached) Aves (Birds) in the (hysterically long-titled!) book Gleanings of natural history, exhibiting figures of quadrupeds, birds, insects, plants, &c. most of which have not, till now, been either figured or described. With descriptions of seventy different subjects, designed, engraved, and coloured after nature, on fifty copper-plate prints./Glanures d'histoire naturelle, consistant en figures de quadrupedes, d'oiseaux, d'insectes, de plantes, &c. Dont on n'avoit point encore eu, pour la plus part, de desseins, ou d'explications; avec les descriptions de soixante et dix différents sujets, dessinés, gravés, et colorés d'après nature, en cinquante plansches , vol I by George Edwards 1758.

This will explain the whole matter as ...:
● the Common name "Edward's Lorikeet" a k a " Edwards's Lory" used firstly on Trichoglossus haematodus LINNAEUS 1771 and thereafter its following "off-spring" Trichoglossus (haematodus) capistratus BECHSTEIN 1811 and T. (h.) capistratus fortis HARTERT 1898
… as commemorating the great British ornithologist George Edwards (1694–1773)

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Not to be confused with (as have been done) the acclaimed British Parrot painter, poet and "nonsense" writer Edward Lear (1812–1888) commemorated in Indigo Macaw Anodorhynchus leari Finsch 1863 a k a " Lear's Macaw".

Anyone think otherwise?
 

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Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
... and ending!

Ok, it´s time to finish my entry on the different Mr. Edwards's and these "Edwards's Birds" …

Thanks to you guys; "mb1848", Laurent, Niels, Fred and Theo – due to your kind and supportive input we finally solved this lengthy (doubled-up) tread!

I hope we all now agree on the following commemorations (of these 3 particular birds – following that short list initially posted as No. 1, in both threads):
● Edwards's Fig-Parrot Psittaculirostris edwardsii OUSTALET 1885 = either Henri Milne Edwards (1800–1885) or his son Alphonse Milne-Edwards (1835–1900).
● Edwards's Pheasant Lophura edwardsi OUSTALET 1896 = most likely Alphonse Milne-Edwards (1835-1900).
● the Common name "Edward's Lorikeet" a k a " Edwards's Lory" used firstly on Trichoglossus haematodus LINNAEUS 1771 and thereafter its following later "splits" T. (haematodus) capistratus BECHSTEIN 1811 as well as T. (h.) capistratus fortis HARTERT 1898 = George Edwards (1694–1773).

All of the rest, and it´s quite a few; edwardsii, edwardsi, edward and eduardi, I conveniently leave to you! If anyone feel like digging further on those – I sure wish you Good luck! On my behalf I´m quite satisfied that we´ve solved ("my") three Edwards's Birds (at least as far as possible!?); The Fig-Parrot, the Pheasant and the Lorikeet. That´ll have to do for a while ...

3 X Edwards's … over and out!
 
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Taphrospilus

Well-known member
And don't forget Edward's Hummingbird (Amazilia edward) for Edward Wilson (1808-1888), brother of Thomas Bellerby Wilson (1807-1865).
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
Well noted, "Taphrospilus"!

In my notes I have:
● Snowy-breasted Hummingbird Amazilia edward DELATTRE & BOURCIER 1846 a k a "Edward's Hummingbird" and (!) "Edwards's Hummingbird": "Dédié a M. Edward Wilson …"
= probably the British naturalist Edward Wilson (1808–1888), brother of Thomas Bellerby Wilson (1807–1865), who both (later) was involved in the sale of Bourcier's large Hummingbird Collection.

I haven´t been able to safely link them together, for sure, with certainty, to this particular Hummingbird ... have you?
 
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Taphrospilus

Well-known member
In the dedication he lived in Lydstip castle near Tenby, Pembrokeshire http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/19647#page/322/mode/1up

On http://www.edwardawilson.com/life/7-life/3-a-cheltenham-childhood-1872-1891 Edward Wilson lived in Hean Castle, Pembrokeshire.

Both very close.

In addition Wilson bought Delattres collection http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/19447#page/75/mode/1up. See Quelques oiseaux nouveaux ou rares rapportés par M. Delatre, de Bolivie, de la Nouvelle-Grenade, et de Panama, par M. de Lafresnaye
 
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Taphrospilus

Well-known member
I am for now to lazy to check all above about the Milne Edwards.

The Eponym Dictionary of Birds claims:
Edwards's Lorikeet Trichoglossus capistratus Bechstein, 1811 [Alt. Marigold Lorikeet; Syn. Trichoglossus haematodus capistratus]
Great Indian Bustard Otis edwardsii J. E. Gray, 1831 NCR [JS Ardeotis nigriceps]
Moss-backed Tanager Bangsia edwardsi Elliott, 1865
Edwards's Rosefinch Carpodacus edwardsii J. Verreaux, 1870 [Alt. Dark-rumped Rosefinch]
Swamphen sp. Porphyrio edwardsi Elliott, 1878 NCR [Alt. Purple Swamphen; JS Porphyrio porphyrio viridis]
Cape Verde Shearwater Calonectris edwardsii Oustalet, 1883
Edwards's Fig Parrot Psittaculirostris edwardsii Oustalet, 1885
Edwards's Pheasant Lophura edwardsi Oustalet, 1896
Henri (father) and Alphonse (son) Milne-Edwards (see Milne-Edwards). The swamphen, and probably all the birds named by Oustalet, were named after Alphonse Milne-Edwards (1835–1900) but it is not always clear which Edwards is intended.

The Key to Scientific Names

Prof. Alphonse Milne-Edwards (1835-1900) French zoologist (‡Alectoris, syn. Casuarius bennetti westermanni, Lophura, syn. Porphyrio poliocephalus viridis).
Prof. Henri Milne Edwards (1800-1885) French zoologist, father of Alphonse Milne-Edwards (syn. Ardeotis nigriceps, Bangsia, Calonectris, Carpodacus, syn. Nilaus afer, Psittaculirostris).

If all correctly attributed and if all mentioned in this thread might need some time to check.
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
I am for now to lazy to check all above about the Milne Edwards.
...
If all correctly attributed and if all mentioned in this thread might need some time to check.

:oops: Sorry Martin, I don't get it ...

If you're too lazy, what's the point of post #15?

As far as I can tell it adds absolutely nothing (just wasting time, and space). Or did I miss something?

I thougt we already had checked all of those eponyms.

Thus, no time to be lazy, pull your socks up (or your sleeves), get a grip, have a cup of coffee, read all the earlier posts, and:

Please explain.

:coffee:

Björn (suddenly somewhat confused & slightly bewildered)
 
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l_raty

laurent raty
We did not check all of them systematically, I believe.

Otis edwardsii Gray 1831 OD
Eponym: "Great Indian Bustard Otis edwardsii J. E. Gray, 1831 NCR [JS Ardeotis nigriceps]"​
Key: "syn. Ardeotis nigriceps"​
No dedication. Alphonse was not born, hence he doesn't enter the equation; but Henri had not done much work in zoology yet either at this time, so it may actually be too early for him as well (particularly if we consider the fact that the author was not French). More likely someone else ? George Edwards does not seem to have illustrated this species. Several other names in this work appear to commemorate collectors.

Buthraupis edwardsi Elliot 1865 plate, text
Eponym: "Moss-backed Tanager Bangsia edwardsi Elliott, 1865"​
Key: "Bangsia"​
Dedicated to M. le professeur Milne Edwards (no hyphen) who was in charge of the Galerie ornithologique du Muséum in 1865 = Henri.

Carpodacus edwardsii Verreaux 1870 OD, later text, still later plate
Eponym: "Edwards's Rosefinch Carpodacus edwardsii J. Verreaux, 1870 [Alt. Dark-rumped Rosefinch]"​
Key: "Carpodacus"​
Dedicated to notre savant professeur M. Milne Edward (no hyphen), in the context of him having authored Carpodacus davidianus in 1865 here (no hyphen either), and who was then in charge of the Galerie ornithologique du Muséum = Henri.

Casuarius edwardsi Oustalet 1878 OD
Eponym: omitted​
Key: "syn. Casuarius bennetti westermanni"​
No dedication. Oustalet worked with Alphonse.

Porphyrio edwardsi Elliot 1878 OD
Eponym: "Swamphen sp. Porphyrio edwardsi Elliott, 1878 NCR [Alt. Purple Swamphen; JS Porphyrio porphyrio viridis]"​
Key: "syn. Porphyrio poliocephalus viridis"​
Dedicated explicitly to Alphonse.

Puffinus edwardsii Oustalet 1883 OD
Eponym: "Cape Verde Shearwater Calonectris edwardsii Oustalet, 1883"​
Key: "Calonectris"​
No dedication. This journal was published under the direction of both Henri and Alphonse. Oustalet worked with Alphonse.

Nilaus edwardsi Rochebrune 1883 OD
Eponym: "Nilaus edwardsi de Rochebrune 1883"​
Key: "syn. Nilaus afer"​
No dedication. Rochebrune worked with Alphonse.

Cyclopsittacus edwardsii Oustalet 1885 OD
Eponym: "Edwards's Fig Parrot Psittaculirostris edwardsii Oustalet, 1885"​
Key: "Psittaculirostris"​
No dedication. This journal was published under the direction of both Henri and Alphonse. Oustalet worked with Alphonse.

Palaeortyx edwardsi Depéret 1887 OD
Eponym: omitted​
Key: "‡Alectoris"​
I see no real dedication, but Alphonse was the paleontologist, he described the genus and the first species attributed to it, and he is abundantly cited in the description: Alphonse.

Gennaeus edwardsi Oustalet 1896 OD
Eponym: "Edwards's Pheasant Lophura edwardsi Oustalet, 1896"​
Key: "Lophura"​
No dedication but, as noted above, Henri had been dead for several years, hence I agree presumably Alphonse.

****

Psittacus capistratus Bechstein 1811 OD
Eponym: "Edwards's Lorikeet Trichoglossus capistratus Bechstein, 1811 [Alt. Marigold Lorikeet; Syn. Trichoglossus haematodus capistratus]"​
Key: omitted (eponymous vernacular name)​
Again as noted above, the vernacular is after George Edwards, who illustrated the bird in Gleanings here.
 
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Taphrospilus

Well-known member
Thank's as well Laurent (y) as this was my intention to clarify them all. I would have done the same but not yesterday (Sunday late afternoon) when I posted it. Sorry to take the burdon on you. :whistle:
 
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