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Sony RX10iii for birding/wildlife (1 Viewer)

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
F# is about light per surface area. Depth of field is determined by F# and sensor size: if F# is the same, then depth of field is narrower as the sensor gets larger.

Niels
 

Steve Babbs

Well-known member
So at the risk of appearing patronising from an in the field point of view F4 on a SLR may well give too shallow a depth of field but with a smaller sensor it is more likely to be okay. I do miss the narrow depth of field for 'arty' shots (although I have kept a SLR body and smaller lenses for these) but mostly the greater depth of field is an advantage with wildlife photography.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
So at the risk of appearing patronising from an in the field point of view F4 on a SLR may well give too shallow a depth of field but with a smaller sensor it is more likely to be okay. I do miss the narrow depth of field for 'arty' shots (although I have kept a SLR body and smaller lenses for these) but mostly the greater depth of field is an advantage with wildlife photography.

I to some extent agree with the section in bold but also know that there are people who disagree. Each to their own.

Niels
 

Steve Babbs

Well-known member
I to some extent agree with the section in bold but also know that there are people who disagree. Each to their own.

Niels
Hence the word mostly. I totally agree there are times when, especially when going for a more atmospheric shot or when keen to make things stand out from a background, I would deliberately choose a shallow fov.
 

Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
Hi Robert - it's an olive-backed sunbird, Cinnyris jugularis. Singapore's most common sunbird, easily seen all over the island, including in most urban parks etc.

Best regards,
patudo

Thanks Patudo! Turns out that I have seen it in SE Asia (according to my notes), but not in Singapore. And I could not remember it at any rate. It's also been a few years.
 

MKinHK

Mike Kilburn
Hong Kong

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Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
Here's a few more pix from my now 41/2 yr-old RX10iii. Recently I found a great video on YouTube from a South African photographer about using the smallest focal area which has been delivering some good results. As ever good light and getting close are also important prerequisites for getting the best out of the camera.

The Lesser Blue-eared Starling is of course an escape.

Cheers
Mike
Thanks Mike, very convincingly demonstrates the high quality of both camera and photographer! :)
I need to look into this YouTube video as I have the RX10iv.
 

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