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Springwatch 2022 (1 Viewer)

Himalaya

Well-known member
I loved the start. I can imagine why people find it off putting though.

The Lesser Spotted Woodpecker footage was superb. What a segment indeed.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Wasn’t mad keen on seeing the footage of the hedgehog eating the Skylark chicks, it didn’t need to be shown that long.
Oh come off it, its nature. Watch Disney if you prefer fluffiness.

Both yesterday and today were good value (the parasitised toad was grim but again, its nature). Really looking forward to next week now.

John
 

Himalaya

Well-known member
Oh come off it, its nature. Watch Disney if you prefer fluffiness.

Both yesterday and today were good value (the parasitised toad was grim but again, its nature). Really looking forward to next week now.

John


Gruesome on a whole new level.

If that toad entered the water, would the maggots have drowned?
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Gruesome on a whole new level.

If that toad entered the water, would the maggots have drowned?
Probably not an issue as toads except when breeding don't spend much time in water.

Watched first edition of the second week and I have to say Springwatch is knocking it out of the park this year. Once again the hour flew by, the Sexton Beetles were great and so were the Badgers (though actually the clip that knocked me out was the Polecat!)

More like this please!

John
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Even a few rarities/scarcities last night (about time) and another fine collection of stuff. I think they should devote a bit more time to readers pix though given that we don't seem to have the post-programme programme any more. Two isn't enough, I was expecting maybe six or so. In general I find public participation (certainly on the radio) mostly both cringey and tedious (and what are presenters for except to do the work?) but Britain's amateur wildlife photographers deserve a bit of a platform.

John
 

Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
It did find the piece on the Aesculapian snakes a bit troubling. These are non-native introductions/escapes. The populations are small but the same could have been said at one time for grey squirrels and the like. They may turn out to be no problem but should they not be returned to captivity or destroyed incase we find out the opposite is true.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
It did find the piece on the Aesculapian snakes a bit troubling. These are non-native introductions/escapes. The populations are small but the same could have been said at one time for grey squirrels and the like. They may turn out to be no problem but should they not be returned to captivity or destroyed incase we find out the opposite is true.
There is more than one population, the other is in Central London where despite occasional shrieks from idiot tabloids (giant constrictor snakes could strangle babies) their regular diet of rats is popular with the locals. As small mammal and small bird specialists they are unlikely to have a profound effect on the environment. Plus, both populations have so far shown low success and actually they would be very difficult to completely eradicate. We've got bigger problems, frankly, and those include Grey Squirrels about which nothing continues to be done by our irresponsible politicians. Personally I see that as an area in which for once the shooting population could make a useful contribution to society and the environment.

John
 

Himalaya

Well-known member
Even a few rarities/scarcities last night (about time) and another fine collection of stuff. I think they should devote a bit more time to readers pix though given that we don't seem to have the post-programme programme any more. Two isn't enough, I was expecting maybe six or so. In general I find public participation (certainly on the radio) mostly both cringey and tedious (and what are presenters for except to do the work?) but Britain's amateur wildlife photographers deserve a bit of a platform.

John


I liked the fact that they covered Great Reed Warbler. I haven't watched the full episode but did they say this was from Wild Ken Hill? Is/was there 3 Great Reed Warblers in Norfolk this spring at one time?

The rarity reports mentioned 2 Great Reed Warblers in Norfolk and both at Snettisham possibly which is very close I know? Could this have moved or was this not even from Wild Ken Hill?
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
I liked the fact that they covered Great Reed Warbler. I haven't watched the full episode but did they say this was from Wild Ken Hill? Is/was there 3 Great Reed Warblers in Norfolk this spring at one time?

The rarity reports mentioned 2 Great Reed Warblers in Norfolk and both at Snettisham possibly which is very close I know? Could this have moved or was this not even from Wild Ken Hill?
The Snettisham GRW is pretty much on the edge of Wild Ken Hill, but access is from the beach car park.

John
 

Robert Wallace

Well-known member
Well that was a mixed bag. Far too much repeat explanation of how they do stuff rather than the wildlife. Also far too much of the metaphysical benefit rubbish: show people what is out there and they will either discover the spiritual aspects for themselves or they won't, I'm now fed up with it being rammed down our throats.

That said there was some great stuff: best thing on the programme was the Osmia bicolor film. More like that please.

I liked the macro photographer too, but hated the briefness of the report and the almost subliminal glimpses given of his work. More prominence and more time to this segment would have been excellent (and leave his family out, concentrate on his excellence and fire up the audience with that rather than giving the broody a chance to coo over little humans.)

As for Iolo, I'm sorry but what a waste sending him to Mull, nothing but repeat after repeat after repeat of stuff we've all seen a million times. Otters, eagles, Hen Harriers, Greylags..... come on. Mull has loads of other stuff. Show us some Corncrakes or breeding Redpolls or anything really!

I'm really feeling Springwatch has run its course and it's time for the next big thing.

John
Tend to agree. Not sure who the target audience is, I've always assumed people new to watching wildlife and to encourage them.
Chris Packham (a person I have high regard for) seems to have lost his sparkle. Not sure about the role of Michaela Strachan other than to look jolly.
The two best presenters are Iola Williams and Megan McCubbin, who despite being another example of BBC nepotism adds a degree of vitality. She may also appeal to and encourage younger viewers to engage purposely with "nature". I miss the contribution of the knowledgeable Gillian Burke whose presenting skills developed extremely well.
 

david kelly

Drive-by Birder
Scotland
There is more than one population, the other is in Central London where despite occasional shrieks from idiot tabloids (giant constrictor snakes could strangle babies) their regular diet of rats is popular with the locals. As small mammal and small bird specialists they are unlikely to have a profound effect on the environment. Plus, both populations have so far shown low success and actually they would be very difficult to completely eradicate. We've got bigger problems, frankly, and those include Grey Squirrels about which nothing continues to be done by our irresponsible politicians. Personally I see that as an area in which for once the shooting population could make a useful contribution to society and the environment.

John
There’s a third population in South Wales:

Clemens, David. J.; Allain, Steven J. R. (2020). "New records of Aesculapian snakes (Zamenis longissimus) in South Wales, UK". Herpetological Bulletin. 152: 30–31. doi:10.33256/152.3031

David
 

JTweedie

Well-known member
I've never seen a nightjar myself but it was fascinating watching it looking around - I thought for a minute it was going to turn its head 360 degrees - it wasn't far off it!
 

YuShan

hikingbirdman.com
United Kingdom
Nightjar with chicks! Very nice!
That birding group was a bit of a nightmare. Just imagine a group of 200 walking into your local reserve or hide!
 

JTweedie

Well-known member
I'd imagine over time the group sizes will get smaller as people gain confidence to start exploring sites on their own while some might decide it's maybe not for them, as happens with any hobby.

I got the impression it was more of a walk they were doing rather than everyone trying to take turns cramming into a hide. It gives people who might not to be used to it, exposure to being out of the city and thinking that yes, nature reserves are for them too. I can imagine some of them might go on one of those walks and enjoy it and then arrange to visit another reserve with a small group of friends or family the following week, coming to rely less on these mass participation events over time.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
I'd imagine over time the group sizes will get smaller as people gain confidence to start exploring sites on their own while some might decide it's maybe not for them, as happens with any hobby.

I got the impression it was more of a walk they were doing rather than everyone trying to take turns cramming into a hide. It gives people who might not to be used to it, exposure to being out of the city and thinking that yes, nature reserves are for them too. I can imagine some of them might go on one of those walks and enjoy it and then arrange to visit another reserve with a small group of friends or family the following week, coming to rely less on these mass participation events over time.
I applaud the group but 200 on a walk is insane especially if they only have a couple of knowledgeable guides. 20 max would be sensible and less if possible.

However I entirely endorse Yu Shan's comment about being descended on by that amount of people at once, fastest way to destroy any hope of welcome and integration. Goodness knows enough people complain on here about crowds of twitchers who mostly know what they are doing!

John
 

Welsh Peregrine

Well-known member
The key trick is managing people’s expectations; providing you can do that, then the more the merrier, the more people who have an interest, the more political pressure there is to ensure environmental action (and then of course the more people to come on bird forum and complain about the exact form that action takes!) 😉
 

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