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Strange "buzzard" types in Germany? (1 Viewer)

Andrew Rowlands

Well-known member
Hi all,

Bird Forum's new server had been down for a while so I decided to visit some old WWW haunts. One stop was at Nick Rossiters site - Honey Buzzards in Britain - the latest update read "15th January 2005: Following review, identification of Honey Buzzards at Staufen, Baden Baden, is considered safe. However, pictures 1-8 from Staufen are now thought to be of juvenile Honey Buzzards, rather than adult Honey Buzzards. (Identification)." (my bold).

Intrigued by the possibility of Nick seriously reviewing some of the published photographs on his site, I found the link to the "Identification" page, http://www.nrossiter.supanet.com/hb/id.htm to find these eight photos. Just over half-way down this page I found them.

"Staufen 1 August, two juveniles, two adults 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8"

Anyone like to confirm this ID?

Question it?

Comment?

Cheers,

Andy.
 

sphinx79

Well-known member
Barring the first picture, which is not good enough for a certain ID, these birds are all typical Common Buzzards, not Honeys at all. This error has been pointed out to the photographer in the past, so it's strange they are still being claimed as Honeys.

Best wishes

Greg
 

Andrew Rowlands

Well-known member
A week has gone by since I started this Thread, only one person has replied (thanks, Greg), Nick Rossiter has read both Posts, scores of other Members and guests have also looked in.

No one has tried to deny that they are Common Buzzards. I don't live near any big migration path for either of these species but I do see Buzzards at concentrations in excess of 30 birds. Honey Buzzards - 5 or 6 different birds seen from one spot during a day.

Go on, Nick; go and look at the Buzzards over the next few days, the reflected light from the snow should give you plenty of detail on the underparts, then compare with your photos; you should see the likeness.

Andy.
 

Jane Turner

Well-known member
Common Buzzard is still rare here... 2 in the last 25 years and I think one of those might have been a very distant Rough-leg! I wasn't suprised that Honey beat it onto the hopuse list. I did have another Buzzard type the week before. All dark and minus a tail! Suspect it was a Bunney too!
 

John o'Sullivan

Well-known member
Andy, I've looked in on this thread and the main thread that inspires it. I've not commented previously as I can't make any sense of any of it. Either Nick knows something I don't. (I've got no experience of recently fledged Honey's for example) or for some reason I can't comprehend lots of photo's and video footage that look very much like common buzzard are being presented as Honey's.
Tim, you demonstrate once more how so much can be said with so few words.
 

Eagle

Well-known member
John o'Sullivan said:
Andy, I've looked in on this thread and the main thread that inspires it. I've not commented previously as I can't make any sense of any of it. Either Nick knows something I don't. (I've got no experience of recently fledged Honey's for example) or for some reason I can't comprehend lots of photo's and video footage that look very much like common buzzard are being presented as Honey's.
Tim, you demonstrate once more how so much can be said with so few words.

Can we lay this one into earth now ...how about it MOds?????

Eagle
 
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