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Swarovski CL companion 8x30 question about light gathering and eye relief (2 Viewers)

An 8x42 will provide roughly double the light transmission of a 8x30 binocular. On the other hand I would also consider a 10x42 binocular. Handholding a 10x binocular is a bit more difficult but you get better visibility for bird ID in low light with the extra magnification.

I always think back to the song with the line "how hopeless it all becomes when you seek all the answers in one". I have a 7x50 marine binocular that is almost like having night vision binos out on the water at night, a 10x25 pocket bino, and Swarovski 8x30 bino, Pentax 10x43 bino, and an inexpensive Nikon Monarch 7 8x25 bino that I leave in the one car and a Nikon Monarch 7 8x42 pair that I leave in my truck.

The pair I use the most are the Swarovski 10x25 CL Pocket Mountain as they fit in a jacket pocket or in their case attached to the side of a backpack and are the most convenient to have on hand. In low light my pick is the 10x43 that works the best for me.

Your point of double the light transmission is highly exaggerated. 8-P
Where did you get that ?

All binocular models are different in many ways, I will leave it at that.

Jerry
 
Your point of double the light transmission is highly exaggerated. 8-P
Where did you get that ?
Jerry

It's basic geometry. The area of a circle is pi (3.141) multiplied by the square of the radius.
So a 30mm objective has a surface area of 706 square millimetres (give or take), and a 42mm objective has a surface area of 1385 square millimetres (give or take) - or just shy of double the area. All other things being equal (glass clarity, lens coatings etc.) the 42mm objective will have nearly double the light gathering capability. As you know, the ability to utilize that extra light will also depend on the observer, the dilation of their pupils etc., but the point is valid.
 
I first saw the difference when out sailing at night and needing to find narrow harbor entrances and discern which red lights marked the channel and which ones needed to be ignored or end up on the rocks. The inexpensive 7x50 marine binos were incredible in making it easy to see where to head and this was thanks to the 50mm objectives.

I have the 8x30 CL B Companion binos and I like them but sometimes wonder if I should have bought the 10x ones instead. One can forget that picking out details in low light the magnification is at least as important as the size of the objectives. I went with the 8x as they are better when I am out on a boat although I tend to take a 10x43 pair as well. If conditions permit I will use the 10x43 ones.
 
I have both the 8x42 NL Pure and 8x30 CL Companion. What amazes me about the CL is the brightness. For 30mm is very very impressive. No blackouts whatsoever, clear edge to edge. Top and bottom a bit soft and a lot of CA on the edges. But overall, a great little Bino.
 
Will an 8X30 be bright enough for an every day binocular?

ABSOLUTELY! It's rare for me to find an 8X30 lacking for almost any birding situation.

I've also had no problem with ER or any other similar issues with either of the latest 8X30 CL models and I wear glasses as well.

I've only owned the new CL B about a month so I haven't used it really enough to give it a glowing recommendation. The central diopter adjustment is a little fiddly. I'm also reserving my opinion about the focus adjustment until later after more use. The optics however are excellent.

If I were to pick a "forever" binocular I'd too believe I'd pick the SLC 8X42 between it and the CL B 8X30. Really the only benefits the CL B has are size/weight and cost. I feel the SLC will be more user friendly, especially for an eyeglass wearer with the larger exit pupil. The SLC 8X42 is DEFINITELY a forever binocular and one you are not likely to get tired of. It will be hard to beat at any price.
Chuck .... you are definitely the King of Binoculars , owning all of the premium known binoculars on this planet must be a huge burden. Are there any Premium Binoculars in the known universe you do not have ? we want be Bino king’s salute you .... Gwen
 
I have used the 8x30 since 2018 and passed it around for other bird guides (spectacle and non spectacle users) for months. They have found that little instrument is awesome and more than enough for them to ID birds and other wildlife in the rainforest.
 
Looking to buy my forever pair of binoculars. I'm primarily will be using these in forested semi open areas. I'm wonder with them being only 8x30 instead of a more traditional 8x42 will they be bright enough to be my everyday binoculars? Or just spend the extra $$$ and go for an SLC 8x42? I'm also wondering if any eyeglass wearers have experienced any blackouts or kidney beaning? I'd like to pair these with a kowa 663m and 30x wide eyepiece. I'm looking to buy these and use them for the next 20years or so.


Thanks for the help
Are you really looking for binoculars that are bright (a light bulb can do better) or are you looking for binoculars that will show you the most detail under given lighting conditions and subsequent light reflections from observation objects, they you can see so? Unfortunately, this is in "contradiction" to the mass to be carried:
Read also practical experiences with "bright" bins - and my conclusions:
Edit:
Sorry, seen too late, thread corpse from January 2020. In some forums, golden spades are awarded to exhumators: Thread exhuminations often create unnecessary effort for well-intentioned helpers, the OP has long since solved his problem. ;-)
 
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I've got one pair of Swarovski binoculars with the Field Pro attachments, a 10x30 CL. And mine came loose twice.

The Field Pro attachments are a bad solution to a non-existent problem IMNSHO. No idea what kind of drugs the guys at Swrovski were on when they introduced it.

Hermann
My CL 8x30s are the same, the pins keep coming loose. I might be unlucky enough to lose the pin(s) in the field. Even more unlucky if I were to lose the binoculars. To try and save them from a fall, I have threaded the rainguard on both sides in the hope that the strap might catch on the rainguard if they start to fall. Not an ideal solution, as the rainguard keeps throttling me when I look up unless I have a long strap (and then a far too long strap for comfort). I am considering cementing the pins in some way, but that might not be so smart. The CLs are in my opinion great optically and ergonomically and I love using them, but the Fieldpro attachment and the pins are a disaster. Which is a shame as I like the rotating feature of the FP attachment :-(
 
My CL 8x30s are the same, the pins keep coming loose. I might be unlucky enough to lose the pin(s) in the field. Even more unlucky if I were to lose the binoculars. To try and save them from a fall, I have threaded the rainguard on both sides in the hope that the strap might catch on the rainguard if they start to fall. Not an ideal solution, as the rainguard keeps throttling me when I look up unless I have a long strap (and then a far too long strap for comfort). I am considering cementing the pins in some way, but that might not be so smart. The CLs are in my opinion great optically and ergonomically and I love using them, but the Fieldpro attachment and the pins are a disaster. Which is a shame as I like the rotating feature of the FP attachment :-(

Seawatcher,

You may want to check my posts 23 and 35 above. Oddly enough you have to order the longer EL pins, not the standard shorter CL pins, to securely attach the strap adapters to the new CL model. I haven't had any problems since getting the EL pins and using them to install the strap adapters for use with a Rick Young harness with the CL. If using a strap, the results might vary. The EL pins when used on the CL with the harness actually work more reliably than on my EL FPs which have come loose a time or two. Maybe I have just been more careful lately but no question you need the FL pins to attach adapters to the CL model.

Like you, I find the new FP rainguard too fiddly whether on EL or the new CL . But the old CL rainguard works perfectly on the new model and is sleeker and easier to use.

Hope this helps.

Mike
 
For two years now I own a Cl 8x30. In the beginning the pins came loose. The problem is, that the wheel with which you turn the pin in fixed position, can turn to easy out of that fixation again. So i put a vertical mark on the wheels when the wheels were in the correct position. Since then when I put on my binoculars, I look if the marks are still in that vertical position. This has become an automatical habbit. In the past two years it happened only twice that they were moved a bit, and I just turned the wheel back again. It never happened when I was carrying the binocular. Probably a wheel becomes accidently turned by putting it out or in the case.
Except this problem I love the CL. Before I owned a Leica Ultravid 7x42. I compared them side by side, and to my 63 years old eyes there were no important differents except fov. But the handling was so far better, that I prefer the CL. Yes, I'm still in love :)
 

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I love the view through the CL 8x30 version 2. What I hate are the tiny eye cups. Can’t be avoided in such a small bino. It is a premium bino. Worthy of the Swarovski name.
 
I know I certainly enjoy my CL 10x30s almost as much as my ELs. When steady, they are a pleasure to look through.
 
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Since I had the CL Companion 8x30 few weeks ago, I use this bino case to bring the Companion with me for birding. No strap, no wires harness needed, at all. The bino is fully protected inside the padded case. No cumbersome straps when glassing. No swaro design or strap complaints. The swaro original straps still stay in the packaging box from day one, more value for my bino if I want to sell it in the future. The case opening/closing action is magnetic. No velcro, no zipper. Zero noise when using the bino. Also I do not need the front and back bino lens covers, it's already well protected inside the soft fabric padded case, ready for glassing without any constraints.
 

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