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Swarovski Habicht 7x42 dissection (3 Viewers)

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
Alternatively, some less excited observations . . .

The Good
The 'Leather'
It’s clearly a synthetic material, and (lightly) smells like a lot of other synthetics. Any intoxication is presumedly in the mind of the holder.


The Bad
The FOV
It is narrow, but most importantly in terms of user comfort, eye movement is not at all restricted. Compare it to the 8x20 Ultravid:
• FOV 114 m/ 1000 m (113 m/ 1000 m)
• AFOV 45 deg (52 deg)
• EP 6 mm (2.5 mm)
The Habicht’s EP having 5.75x the area of the Ultravid makes all the difference: a narrow view but not really 'tunnel like'.
It's not at all restricting of eye movement - with the eyes locked ahead like 'looking down a straw' - as with the 8x20.

The Focuser
Due to the way that the mechanism is made airtight (by having each eyepiece slide back and forth through a synthetic seal),
the focuser does require notably more effort than with other binoculars - but neither augmented nor non-human strength is needed.
A push-pull motion using a finger from each hand largely deals with the problem.

Eyecup Diameter
There’s a number of ways to increase the eyecup diameter, either by adding material or replacing the eyecups.
But with the Habicht and other binoculars with small diameter eyepieces, I inevitably come back to using an index finger curved above each eyecup
to provide superior contact, comfort and stability.

Eye Relief
The real bad is of course the short eye relief. It’s only 12.5 mm from the eyecup rim. So too little for many eyeglass wearers.
(And the 10x40W’s is even less at only 11 mm; see these and a lot of other ER measurements by Canip at: The PINACOLLECTION – Binoculars Today )


The Ugly
There are some inherent limitations (especially the ER), but most can be easily minimised.
For more details on some easy fixes, see posts #6 and 7 at: Habicht 8x30W and Italian supercars (my take on the Habicht)
And for more on eyecups, see: Eye cups Swarovski Habicht 10x40 GA


None of the Habichts would be a first choice for birding, but neither are they a last resort.
So a specialised but interesting addition for some.


John
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Alternatively, some less excited observations . . .

The Good
The 'Leather'
It’s clearly a synthetic material, and (lightly) smells like a lot of other synthetics. Any intoxication is presumedly in the mind of the holder.


The Bad
The FOV
It is narrow, but most importantly in terms of user comfort, eye movement is not at all restricted. Compare it to the 8x20 Ultravid:
• FOV 114 m/ 1000 m (113 m/ 1000 m)
• AFOV 45 deg (52 deg)
• EP 6 mm (2.5 mm)
The Habicht’s EP having 5.75x the area of the Ultravid makes all the difference: a narrow view but not really 'tunnel like'.
It's not at all restricting of eye movement - with the eyes locked ahead like 'looking down a straw' - as with the 8x20.

The Focuser
Due to the way that the mechanism is made airtight (by having each eyepiece slide back and forth through a synthetic seal),
the focuser does require notably more effort than with other binoculars - but neither augmented nor non-human strength is needed.
A push-pull motion using a finger from each hand largely deals with the problem.

Eyecup Diameter
There’s a number of ways to increase the eyecup diameter, either by adding material or replacing the eyecups.
But with the Habicht and other binoculars with small diameter eyepieces, I inevitably come back to using an index finger curved above each eyecup
to provide superior contact, comfort and stability.

Eye Relief
The real bad is of course the short eye relief. It’s only 12.5 mm from the eyecup rim. So too little for many eyeglass wearers.
(And the 10x40W’s is even less at only 11 mm; see these and a lot of other ER measurements by Canip at: The PINACOLLECTION – Binoculars Today )


The Ugly
There are some inherent limitations (especially the ER), but most can be easily minimised.
For more details on some easy fixes, see posts #6 and 7 at: Habicht 8x30W and Italian supercars (my take on the Habicht)
And for more on eyecups, see: Eye cups Swarovski Habicht 10x40 GA


None of the Habichts would be a first choice for birding, but neither are they a last resort.
So a specialised but interesting addition for some.


John
Now you have gone and ruined my leather fantasy! It sure smells like leather. Maybe they put something into the leatherette, so it smells like leather. It is true that the bigger exit pupil helps with eye placement and movement on the Habicht, but it still has the smallest AFOV of any full size binocular I have ever used. I guarantee you when I would switch from my NL to the Habicht it felt like tunnel vision. I have had a lot of binoculars, and the Habicht is by far the tightest focuser I have ever experienced. Having to use two fingers to move a focuser on a binocular is a real inconvenience to me. I used the finger cup method to deal with the tiny eye cups also, but you know what? I don't have to do that on the NL. The eye cups fit my eye sockets perfectly, like they should. Your correct the ER is a deal killer for a lot of people that wear glasses, and hopefully they are aware of the Habicht's short ER. You don't have to defend the Habicht. I still love it for that things that it excels at. It is a unique and unusual binocular. There is really nothing else like it on the market. If I collected binoculars like I use to, I probably would still have one, but anymore I just keep a couple binoculars that I use for birding and that right now is an NL 8x32 and Curio 7x21. I prefer the big FOV of the NL with sharp edges and relatively big FOV for a pocket of the Curio with sharp edges. I am more into what works the best for me for birding. For now, but as we all know that could change. ;)
 
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[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
The movie title is „The Good, the Bad and the Ugly“, so there was no place in your post for „the Beautiful“, the latter having been emphasized so strongly in allbinos‘ review of the 10x40 some years ago 😁, see Swarovski Habicht 10x40 W - binoculars review - AllBinos.com
(towards the end of the review)
I didn't say the Habicht was ugly. I think they are one of the most beautiful binoculars around. The build quality is superb, and I love the smell of them, even though it is fake leather. 😁
 

ReinierBos

Well-known member
Netherlands
I think they are beautiful. One day I hope to own the 10x40... however, I have never looked through one. Maybe that would temper my desire a bit. Short eye relief, narrow eyecups...
 

Hermann

Well-known member
Short eye relief, narrow eyecups...
Short eyerelief - yes. However, you can always use the green eyecups of the GA version. They're much more comfortable if you don't wear glasses. If you do, I personally prefer the narrow eyecups.

BTW, I find I can use the 7x42 with my glasses quite easily without losing any field of view. The 10x40 is more difficult.

Hermann
 

PW42

Active member
United Kingdom
I fold down the eyecups when wearing glasses and this gives a full FOV. When not using glasses, I have some cheap (~£2) eyecups which slip over and are much more comfortable and also help stop stray light from the side. (This is for an 8x30 rather than 7x42 but I imagine the issues are the same).
 

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