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Swarovski NL 8x42 - First Impressions (1 Viewer)

NoSpringChicken

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I watched the above video with the subtitles on, so as not to disturb my partner who was on the phone. It was rather disconcerting that the subtitles changed the name to 'Anal Pure'. I wonder if that describes the typical purchaser?

Ron
 

BabyDov

Well-known member
Supporter
United States
I watched the above video with the subtitles on, so as not to disturb my partner who was on the phone. It was rather disconcerting that the subtitles changed the name to 'Anal Pure'. I wonder if that describes the typical purchaser?

Ron
I beg your pardon...
 
" light flare ring " on the outer area of FOV !!!!!

This is a no go for this binoculars, this issue remember me when i bought a very early sample of 8x42 SF, Huge green cast and muted view ( To my Eyes ) and crescent orange flare on the lower part of FOV, pictures posted on this forum.
At least that issue was visible close to the sun not looking everywhere like on new NL.

Now i have a cherry unit black armour 8x42 SF.....a keeper, just slight green cast and amazing flare, glare performance with nome of the faults found on my first sample.

New model new problems...........for me better to wait but i will go on September to check one sample myself.
Hello Globetrotter,

I have the issue of crescent orange flare on the SF8x42. Could you let me know the url where I can find the pictures posted on this forum for this issue?
Thank you,
John N.
 

Scudder

Member
Canada
I bought the Swarovski NL Pure 8x42 yesterday. It replaces a Bushnell Legend M 8x42. My, the Swaros are in another universe! The ergonomics are perfect for my hands. The field of view is huge, and the clarity is stunning. I have been out twice with it so far and I love it!

I look forward to reading other people's impressions.

Swar1.jpg Swar2.jpg
 

Dutchbirder64

Well-known member
I bought the Swarovski NL Pure 8x42 yesterday. It replaces a Bushnell Legend M 8x42. My, the Swaros are in another universe! The ergonomics are perfect for my hands. The field of view is huge, and the clarity is stunning. I have been out twice with it so far and I love it!

I look forward to reading other people's impressions.

View attachment 1377772 View attachment 1377771
Congrats. Check if the two little rubber inserts are in the white box. You want to get rid of the lens covers. Pretty goofy in the field Imo.
 

dries1

Member
An attempt by Swarovski as stated by Scudder, however some still are returned to the store and resold, like the flawed SLC 15X56 I purchased from Cabelas new in Box. I sent them into Swarovski and it was serviced. Cabelas has really gone down IMO, I will never buy another optic from them. Thankfully there other smaller stores that provide better service to their customers.
 

jan van daalen

Well-known member
It might be. It says to phone Swarovski customer service, instead of returning the binoculars to the store.
Still don't get it.
The one and only extra value of a store is to support the brand and the customer to the fullest.
A satisfied customer is an ambassador for the store and the brand and solving problems is long term vision.
A dis-satisfied customer (see above) proves the opposite.
So why would Swarovski encourage the customer to pass the dealer/store and handle the problems with them directly?
First thing I would do is to remove that "STOP" page out of the box and ask Swaro what the F**K.....

Jan.
 

dries1

Member
Jan,

Your store and with provide good customer service which is quite absent to the large chain stores/Amazon here in the US. Many a glass is returned and resold as new. The glass was returned for what ever reason, and the counter person does a general check, says looks good to me back into the box for sale. Sometimes no reason is given for a return other than "they did not work with me". I guess this is the way Swarovski handles it in the US because face it, here in the US there is no incentive by the counter person at all to provide service, they are just there to ring up the sale, and many are not the sharpest knives in the drawer.
 

jan van daalen

Well-known member
The Netherlands is roughly 200 by 400 km and has 17 million (registrated) people.
AFAIK, Swarovski has 23 A- dealers (volume) and much more B and C dealers.
Internet sales in optics is OK for the <400,00 euro optics. They're hardly sold in the >1.000,00 area, but I can understand it's different in non rural circumstances.
Still, superb customer service is King, at least aught to be.

Jan
 

dwever

Registered User
Supporter
In the U.S., on-line shopping will continue to displace brick and mortar retailers. In the U.S., one in four retail transactions are internet based, yet almost 2 in three Americans live in metro areas of plus 1 million residents representing over 200 million of our 330 million people meaning they're not necessarily in Kodiak, Alaska with no other shopping choices. Americans are moving away from brick and mortar shops and towards internet based one-day-delivery retail shopping. This rapidly shifting retail model can and should calibrate how manufacturers deal with issues like the Swarovski Stop Sign.

Stop sign or not, had my Midway USA bought NL Pure come in defective, Midway USA would be swapping it out, Swaro would not be in that picture.

The shift towards internet retailing is strongest among earners most likely to drop $3K for a pair of NL Pure. Online shopping intent for non-essential categories is highest among high income earners. Alpha binoculars are the definition of non-essential, and they are purchased by high income earners. 75% of consumers have tried new shopping behaviors, and 80% plan to continue. Americans are also switching to low-touch shopping methods such as the internet since COVID and plan to continue after the Covid crisis. Consumers who make over $100,000 a year tend to be more able to stay at home during the pandemic crisis, allowing them to shop more online. This group is slightly less price sensitive than other cohorts due to greater job stability.

Consumers use of online channels before and after Covid:

Screen Shot 2021-04-04 at 1.36.27 PM.png
 
Last edited:

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
In the U.S., on-line shopping will continue to displace brick and mortar retailers. In the U.S., one in four retail transactions are internet based, yet almost 2 in three Americans live in metro areas of plus 1 million residents representing over 200 million of our 330 million people meaning they're not necessarily in Kodiak, Alaska with no other shopping choices. Americans are moving away from brick and mortar shops and towards internet based one-day-delivery retail shopping. This rapidly shifting retail model can and should calibrate how manufacturers deal with issues like the Swarovski Stop Sign.

Stop sign or not, had my Midway USA bought NL Pure come in defective, Midway USA would be swapping it out, Swaro would not be in that picture.

The shift towards internet retailing is strongest among earners most likely to drop $3K for a pair of NL Pure. Online shopping intent for non-essential categories is highest among high income earners. Alpha binoculars are the definition of non-essential, and they are purchased by high income earners. 75% of consumers have tried new shopping behaviors, and 80% plan to continue. Americans are also switching to low-touch shopping methods such as the internet and plan to continue after the Covid crisis. Consumers who make over $100,000 a year tend to be more able to stay at home during the pandemic crisis, allowing them to shop more online. This group is slightly less price sensitive than other cohorts due to greater job stability.

Consumers use of online channels before and after Covid:

View attachment 1377955
Think this is spot on.
Here in NYC, the formerly vibrant shopping opportunities along Madison Ave are rapidly disappearing, replaced by hair salons and empty store fronts.
The shopping experience is no longer desirable if the sales staff can infect you, so people switch to the easy buy, easy return alternative that on line shopping offers.
 

dries1

Member
Yes it is true about the growth of on-line shopping, and just like in person retail, there are also online vendors who are lousy at customer service.

Regarding NYC I could think of other reasons bedside the virus for the flight of businesses out of town.
 

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