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Swift? Spore (1 Viewer)

wuwu1277

Well-known member
Hi,: This photo was taken last week in Singapore. From my bino, I can see the white rump and white patch on head. Can you pls advise the ID. Thank you so much in advance.
 

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Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Supposed to be mainly Germain's in Singapore aren't they, could be wrong, a while since my last visit?
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
After spending quite sometime on google, I'm going to go with Germain's Swiftlet.
 

wuwu1277

Well-known member
After spending quite sometime on google, I'm going to go with Germain's Swiftlet.

Hi, KC Foggin: Thank you so much for the confirmation. Actually, I also compared the image with other swiftlets in ebird, but noticed that certain difference and unsure the ID then. Again, thank you.
 

orientaldkf

Well-known member
Rump colour is variable and size cannot be told apart reliably in the field, so the only definite way to identify the two species is to see them perched on their nests.
 

viator

Well-known member
Singapore
Supposed to be mainly Germain's in Singapore aren't they, could be wrong, a while since my last visit?
Unfortunately not - both are supposed to be common although I've seen a mention somewhere of Germain's being very common and Black-nest being common if you want to apply some relative weightage!
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
It's time that someone came up with a detector fo Swiftlets, such as those used for Bats. Does anyone know if their echo location frequncies are distinct from each other?
 

SteveMM

Well-known member
My point is that they echo locate as Bats do, I can't imagine it would be so hard, to rig a bat detector to identify the birds in flight without the need to record them.
OK, I see. I think it's the time interval between clicks and the structure of the social calls that are diagnostic (not the frequencies themselves). My mistake.

Steve
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
OK, I see. I think it's the time interval between clicks and the structure of the social calls that are diagnostic (not the frequencies themselves). My mistake.

Steve
OK, maybe my idea of the workings of the echo location is wrong, perhaps it's not comparable to that of Bats and the detector couldn't pick up the location calls?
 

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