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Symposiachrus (Monarchidae) (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Michael J. Andersen, Jenna M. McCullough, Ethan F. Gyllenhaal, Xena M. Mapel, Tri Haryoko, Knud A. Jønsson, and Leo Joseph. 2021. Complex histories of gene flow and a mitochondrial capture event in a non‐sister pair of birds. Molecular Ecology, published only 21 February 2021. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15856

Abstract

Hybridization, introgression, and reciprocal gene flow during speciation, specifically the generation of mitonuclear discordance, are increasingly observed as parts of the speciation process. Genomic approaches provide insight into where, when, and how adaptation operates during and after speciation and can measure historical and modern introgression. Whether adaptive or neutral in origin, hybridization can cause mitonuclear discordance by placing the mitochondrial genome of one species (or population) in the nuclear background of another species. The latter, introgressed species may eventually have its own mtDNA replaced or “captured” by other species across its entire geographical range. Intermediate stages in the capture process should be observable. Two non‐sister species of Australasian monarch‐flycatchers, Spectacled Monarch (Symposiachrus trivirgatus) mostly of Australia and Indonesia and Spot‐winged Monarch (S. guttula) of New Guinea, present an opportunity to observe this process. We analysed thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) derived from ultraconserved elements of all subspecies of both species. Mitochondrial DNA sequences of Australian populations of S. trivirgatus form two paraphyletic clades, one being sister to and presumably introgressed by S. guttula despite little nuclear signal of introgression. Population genetic analyses (e.g., tests for modern and historical gene flow and selection) support at least one historical gene flow event between S. guttula and Australian S. trivirgatus. We also uncovered introgression from the Maluku Islands subspecies of S. trivirgatus into an island population of S. guttula, resulting in apparent nuclear paraphyly. We find that neutral demographic processes, not adaptive introgression, are the most likely cause of these complex population histories. We suggest that a Pleistocene extinction of S. guttula from mainland Australia resulted from range expansion by S. trivirgatus.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Jenna M. McCullough, Ethan F. Gyllenhaal, Xena M. Mapel, Michael J. Andersen, and Leo Joseph. 2021. Taxonomic implications of recent molecular analyses of Spectacled (Symposiachrus trivirgatus) and Spot-winged (S. guttula) Monarchs (Passeriformes: Monarchidae). Emu, Published online: 25 Oct 2021.
https://doi.org/10.1080/01584197.2021.1977143

ABSTRACT
Genomic approaches to phylogeography routinely reveal that our estimates of species level diversity within island systems are woefully underappreciated. A recent analysis of population genetics, phylogeography and historical demography of two pied monarchs (Monarchidae), the Spectacled (Symposiachrus trivirgatus) and Spot-winged Monarchs (S. guttula), uncovered unexpected instances of paraphyly and genetic diversity. Here, we discuss the taxonomic implications for these species complexes and recommend recognising three species within what has been considered S. trivirgatus. We defer the naming of a genetically distinct and admixed population of S. guttula on Gag Island, Indonesia, and, pending further study, we advocate continued recognition of this species as monotypic. This study highlights cryptic diversity in the Indo-Pacific species complex and the need for thoroughly sampled phylogenomic datasets to reconcile taxonomy with the complex evolutionary history of birds in this region.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Jenna M. McCullough, Ethan F. Gyllenhaal, Xena M. Mapel, Michael J. Andersen, and Leo Joseph. 2021. Taxonomic implications of recent molecular analyses of Spectacled (Symposiachrus trivirgatus) and Spot-winged (S. guttula) Monarchs (Passeriformes: Monarchidae). Emu, Published online: 25 Oct 2021.
https://doi.org/10.1080/01584197.2021.1977143

ABSTRACT
Genomic approaches to phylogeography routinely reveal that our estimates of species level diversity within island systems are woefully underappreciated. A recent analysis of population genetics, phylogeography and historical demography of two pied monarchs (Monarchidae), the Spectacled (Symposiachrus trivirgatus) and Spot-winged Monarchs (S. guttula), uncovered unexpected instances of paraphyly and genetic diversity. Here, we discuss the taxonomic implications for these species complexes and recommend recognising three species within what has been considered S. trivirgatus. We defer the naming of a genetically distinct and admixed population of S. guttula on Gag Island, Indonesia, and, pending further study, we advocate continued recognition of this species as monotypic. This study highlights cryptic diversity in the Indo-Pacific species complex and the need for thoroughly sampled phylogenomic datasets to reconcile taxonomy with the complex evolutionary history of birds in this region.
Interested !!
 

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