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Tamron 2nd generation SP 150-600mm Di VC USD 'G2' (1 Viewer)

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Thanks chap !

Yes, i was very happy with both those Tamrons, but have now traded them off for a howitzer ( Sigma 300-800 )

Last time I saw one of those, it had its own backpack carried by one person, the camera bodies were in a different backpack together with a macro lens, and the tripod still had to be carried over a shoulder. I for one will not get that type of equipment.

Niels
 

Apodidae49

Well-known member

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
I like those Camera Labs reviews and find them very comprehensive. The Tammy G2 got an overall ‘Recommended’ verdict and the Nikon 200-500 got ‘Highly Recommended’
And yet - the G2 Tammy tested sharper at both 500mm and 600mm, and ........ is 300 grams lighter, and completely fine tunable on an individual unit/set-up basis, and cheaper ! ;)

This gives the advantage in reach and cropped photos to the Tammy. Pretty much the primary concern among birders.

The Niki 200-500 proved slightly better in the 200-400mm range, and of course it is a third of a stop faster from 420-500mm.

Most of my shooting has been at maximum focal lengths. There would have been a few curious birds where I've had to zoom out, the odd landscape at the 150mm minimum, and I think a solitary lazy seagull at the same length - maybe he thought I had some hot chips ?! :eat:

Getting close, with the lighting direction right, in good atmospheric conditions, with good technique and settings will see a blanket pretty much thrown over all these type of offerings in practical terms ...... :cat:

Hope Santa comes early for you ! :)





Chosun :gh:
 

Apodidae49

Well-known member
And yet - the G2 Tammy tested sharper at both 500mm and 600mm, and ........ is 300 grams lighter, and completely fine tunable on an individual unit/set-up basis, and cheaper ! ;)

This gives the advantage in reach and cropped photos to the Tammy. Pretty much the primary concern among birders.

The Niki 200-500 proved slightly better in the 200-400mm range, and of course it is a third of a stop faster from 420-500mm.

Most of my shooting has been at maximum focal lengths. There would have been a few curious birds where I've had to zoom out, the odd landscape at the 150mm minimum, and I think a solitary lazy seagull at the same length - maybe he thought I had some hot chips ?! :eat:

Getting close, with the lighting direction right, in good atmospheric conditions, with good technique and settings will see a blanket pretty much thrown over all these type of offerings in practical terms ...... :cat:

Hope Santa comes early for you ! :)





Chosun :gh:

I’ve already got the 200-500 for my 70th but, wives being what they are, I can’t get my hands on it till the 30th! :-C

I shot some tests in the shop doorway in RAW & Jpeg and I’m happy with the sharpness despite it being a dull, rainy winter’s day.

Not far from me (around 20 miles) is a manufacturer and seller of good quality neoprene camo lens covers. I’m not sold on the benefits of the camo so much as the protection that can be afforded to my new pride and joy, so I’ll take a trip there in the New Year.
 

Apodidae49

Well-known member
So, the story so far...

Got my Nikon 200-500 on my 70th Birthday, put some neoprene camo on it for protection and attached it to the D7200 for some bird feeder shots from the open conservatory door. Uneasy feelings began manifest themselves around the handling and general manoeuvrability of the lens. With decent camo in place and given that the Nikon has a straight, parallel barrel my hands (big as they are) were feeling a little small and clumsy when focussing, etc. A trip to Martin Mere and a session in and out of the hides further emphasised the feeling of foreboding surrounding the handling of the lens. All shots taken of static birds were sharp but BIF were more problematic (mainly down to me, not the lens)

Anyway, long story short, a return to all of the reviews that Chosun posted and a bit of creative photographic dealer persuasion (with tactical omissions about taking it into the field) and I returned it and inspected the Tammy which, after some shots from the door to ascertain sharpness (VERY) and the general better tactile qualities of the lens, saw me walk out with it.

All’s well that ends well, as the bard said and I’m looking forward to getting out in the field with the Tammy later in the week with a lesson well learned
 
Last edited:

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
So, the story so far...

Got my Nikon 200-500 on my 70th Birthday, put some neoprene camo on it for protection and attached it to the D7200 for some bird feeder shots from the open conservatory door. Uneasy feelings began manifest themselves around the handling and general manoeuvrability of the lens. With decent camo in place and given that the Nikon has a straight, parallel barrel my hands (big as they are) were feeling a little small and clumsy when focussing, etc. A trip to Martin Mere and a session in and out of the hides further emphasised the feeling of foreboding surrounding the handling of the lens. All shots taken of static birds were sharp but BIF were more problematic (mainly down to me, not the lens)

Anyway, long story short, a return to all of the reviews that Chosun posted and a bit of creative photographic dealer persuasion (with tactical omissions about taking it into the field) and I returned it and inspected the Tammy which, after some shots from the door to ascertain sharpness (VERY) and the general better tactile qualities of the lens, saw me walk out with it.

All’s well that ends well, as the bard said and I’m looking forward to getting out in the field with the Tammy later in the week with a lesson well learned
If you've ended up with the one that handles best for you then that's ultimately the right choice as there's less than a bee's dc*k between them optically. If the unit you finally carried out was VERY sharp then good choice ! :t: (I hope you got it at the Black Friday sales price ;) :)

Make sure you go through the fine tuning procedure at the various focal lengths and distances to get the maximum out of it with your particular camera unit. It's not essential but life's too short, and it's easy.

Now for some shooting ! :t:





Chosun :gh:
 

Apodidae49

Well-known member
If you've ended up with the one that handles best for you then that's ultimately the right choice as there's less than a bee's dc*k between them optically. If the unit you finally carried out was VERY sharp then good choice ! :t: (I hope you got it at the Black Friday sales price ;) :)

Make sure you go through the fine tuning procedure at the various focal lengths and distances to get the maximum out of it with your particular camera unit. It's not essential but life's too short, and it's easy.

Now for some shooting ! :t:





Chosun :gh:

Looked sharp to me from some photos I took at various focal lengths of writing on various objects & billboards.

Don’t know about fine tuning (via the add-on dock, I guess) and probably won’t bother with it unless I get results I don’t like.

Important thing is I’ve got it from a reputable high street dealer, there’s a free 5 Year Warranty and the price was £50 better than Black Friday (and £50 cheaper than the Niki)
 

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