Tamron SP 150-600mm F5-6.3 DI IF VC USD

Gronk08

Well-known member
Thanks Gronk. Do you shoot smaller birds in flight? How does the speed of focus on the tammy compare with the Canon 400 prime? That's now my only major concern about trading (apart from weight).

Ta
Sean

To date I have not had a chance at doing any small bird BIF work, but over all the focus speed between the two lenses are about the same, although I have yet to try the lens out on a fast moving subject.
To date I am more than happy with the lens and I can't see there being any problem when I come to try my hand at BIF shots.

Tim.
 

hosesbroadbill

Well-known member
Tamron and 7dii

Yes sorry my mistake; you are slowly convincing me to take this lens as seriously as the 400 but I still worry about speed of focusing for LBJs in flight!
Sean

Here are a few more from the other day that I finally got around to processing. All handheld and taken with the new 7dii.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15715628492/in/photostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15528684058/in/photostream/

This is my favorite of the series.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15529310190/in/photostream/

Light was not right on this shot. Face is in the dark but I like the colors and the rest of the image.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15690471866/in/photostream/
 
BIF with tamron sp 150-600 and 70d

I personally own a 70d and a canon 70-300 L IS which I use primarily for wildlife and birds. I am very happy with the AI focus on the 70-300L for BIF, but the only shortcoming is the max focal length of 300mm.

For the extra reach, I want to go in for the Tamron 150-600, however my only concern is that whether it would function as well in the AI servo mode (on a crop sensor like the 70d) for BIF. Your views please.

Thanks,

Vikram.
 

hosesbroadbill

Well-known member
for BIF

I personally own a 70d and a canon 70-300 L IS which I use primarily for wildlife and birds. I am very happy with the AI focus on the 70-300L for BIF, but the only shortcoming is the max focal length of 300mm.

For the extra reach, I want to go in for the Tamron 150-600, however my only concern is that whether it would function as well in the AI servo mode (on a crop sensor like the 70d) for BIF. Your views please.

Thanks,

Vikram.

Works fine for BIF. See previous posts about this. I have posted pics of large and small birds with excellent success.
 

hosesbroadbill

Well-known member
Junco

Got out just a bit again with my 7dii and the Tamron during lunch. Was able to get a shot I really like (although not the best pose but nice details).

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15548387347/in/photostream/

Still have yet to see a shot like this with the 400 plus a converter.

Anyway seems like there are 2 sides on this issue and not too many have/will change.

Also not sure what else there is to say about this lens that has not already been said.
 

Stephen Mark

Well-known member
I finally got a chance to play with the Tammy briefly at the lacal camera store's grand opening yesterday, OMG!! there were no bird around so I didn't bother to post but hand held at over a 1/4 mile away I got a shot of an American flag on top of a 35 story building with crisp detail on the stars. Very heavy overcast and still nice details at f6.0. I may forgo waiting on the Sigma and just go ahead with the Tammy. By the way those were taken with a D5200 so it was close to 900mm with the crop factor.
Steve
 

jimthomson

Well-known member
Sparrow with 400mm +1.4x

Got out just a bit again with my 7dii and the Tamron during lunch. Was able to get a shot I really like (although not the best pose but nice details).

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15548387347/in/photostream/

Still have yet to see a shot like this with the 400 plus a converter.

Anyway seems like there are 2 sides on this issue and not too many have/will change.

Also not sure what else there is to say about this lens that has not already been said.


Will this do?
 

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Stephen Mark

Well-known member
Jim
Since you listed a Sigma 150-500 among your lenses whats your opinion of that lens, I ask since I was told they will be closed out (Sigma is discontinuing it) at a very attractive price.
Thanks
Steve
 

hosesbroadbill

Well-known member
comparison

Will this do?

To me the shot that you posted is not as sharp as the junco. The area around the face is not as defined (maybe you shook a bit or missed sharp focus?). The colors are not nearly as contrasty and vibrant (maybe due to lighting) and overall I see more details on what I posted. Again not trying to be rude, just to give a fair comparison.

Here are a few more I got yesterdaywith the Tamron and 7dii

American Goldfinch

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15742123882/

Gadwall

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15120288614/in/photostream/
 

jimthomson

Well-known member
Jim
Since you listed a Sigma 150-500 among your lenses whats your opinion of that lens, I ask since I was told they will be closed out (Sigma is discontinuing it) at a very attractive price.
Thanks
Steve

I actually have both the Tamron and the Sigma. The Tamron 150-600 is a much better lens than the Sigma 150-500. Sigma is really soft at 500mm no matter what you do. The Tamron at 600 is soft at f6.3 but is quite good at f8-f11. I haven't used my Sigma since I got the Tamron, just haven't got around to selling it.

I originally got the Sigma for birds, but quickly replaced it with the Canon 400mm f5.6 which in my opinion is the best lens for birds in flight. I kept the Sigma for Airplanes as I find using a zoom works best for airplanes.
 

Stephen Mark

Well-known member
Thanks Jim. The supposed Black Friday price was tempting me but I'll just take another two of three months to put the money in place for the Tamron.
Steve
 

jimthomson

Well-known member
Got out just a bit again with my 7dii and the Tamron during lunch. Was able to get a shot I really like (although not the best pose but nice details).

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15548387347/in/photostream/

Still have yet to see a shot like this with the 400 plus a converter.

Anyway seems like there are 2 sides on this issue and not too many have/will change.

Also not sure what else there is to say about this lens that has not already been said.
How about this one?
 

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hosesbroadbill

Well-known member
Flycatcher

stunning capture of that flycatcher. shooting as close as one can get does the trick with long lenses, I think. Beautiful.

Thanks. Honestly I am a bit frustrated with my flycatcher shots. I know they are sharp, but this damn bird was a skulker. Stayed very low or very high. Could not get it to sit out in the open with a nice backdrop for that classic perched shot of a flycatcher. The close up was more out of necessity as the bird was being protected by tall grass and I couldn't get the whole bird so I zoomed all the way in and went for a close up. Anyway, the camera and lens performed very well. Short commings were my fault for sure (and the bird helped by staying hidden or behind things).

Here is one other shot of it that I like more for the colors and the fall feel of it than for it being a fantastic portrait. I find that for me my shots get way better when I get way closer. Totally agree.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15574098057/in/photostream/
 
User technique

Having arrived late (by about a year?) I've been skim-reading this thread. Fascinating! One notion that cropped up a few times is the skillset required to make the most of long lenses.

In the new year (if Santa is kind!!) I MAY be in the happy situation of being a 'long-lens-newbie'.

Can anybody point me in the right direction (another thread here or another website) to learn something of these dark arts ?

Regards - wiltshirejohn
 

hosesbroadbill

Well-known member
Long lens use

Having arrived late (by about a year?) I've been skim-reading this thread. Fascinating! One notion that cropped up a few times is the skillset required to make the most of long lenses.

In the new year (if Santa is kind!!) I MAY be in the happy situation of being a 'long-lens-newbie'.

Can anybody point me in the right direction (another thread here or another website) to learn something of these dark arts ?

Regards - wiltshirejohn

I really think that the lens you are going to get will have a great impact on how you use it.

For instance, the Tamron is easily hand held in most if not all situations. I can tell you the few instances where I struggle when hand holding are birds that are perched high up and when it is very windy. That is about it. Otherwise I just hold the camera and lens steady and shoot.

If you get something like the new Sigma than maybe that will be too heavy. Not sure as I have not seen or held one.

Not sure what camera you use but I am sure that the large primes are all very heavy and not easy to hand hold. I know a few that do hand hold for a few shots but do not have best results when doing so. For best results they use a tripod and gimball type head.

Otherwise my best advice is to forget that you have 500 or 600 mm and get as close as possible to the birds without scaring them. I think that is the biggest mistake that most new owners make with longer lenses. They think that if they have longer glass that they do not need to get as close. I totally disagree. All of my best pics have been through close approach, good light and a steady hand. Very few of my large crops have results anywhere close to the shots when I was close.

Hope that helps.
 

hosesbroadbill

Well-known member
What is left

I think the only thing left to figure out now is how the Tamron will compare to the two new offerings by Sigma. I know initial word is that the Sigma is sharper. But how will that play out with the fact that it is also heavier and twice as expensive. Can it be hand held? Used for BIF?

In the meantime here are a few shots I got with the Canon 7dii and the Tamron the other day during lunch. (only time I can get out recently)

A Great Blue Heron that was about to land.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15583590439/

A Canada Goose

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15767613571/in/photostream/

A Northern Shoveler in harsh mid day light

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15769641535/in/photostream/

And something that is not my usual subject, a squirrel.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15771141722/in/photostream/

This lens is damn sharp as far as I am concerned. I just don't see what the people that continue to say that it is soft are talking about. Keep in mind that these are also only processed in DPP with only minor adjustments. I am sure that in Lightroom or some other program a more skilled processor could do some more with them.
 
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