• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Tascam DR-44WL (1 Viewer)

horukuru

Here I Come !
Malaysia
Hio all, I was reading back the manual and found out the Low-cut Filter has 4 options of 40hz, 80hz, 120hz and 220hz. Which one I should choose for bird recording? It is used with Sennheiser ME66/K6 at 24 bit 48k or 96k.
 

Jon.Bryant

Well-known member
Basically low cut filters reduce or eliminate noise below the selected frequency. Filters can be good at reducing low frequency noise from mic handling and wind.

Most birds vocalise well above 220hz, so the choice of filter will not directly impact the bird recording - that is unless you are trying to record something extremely unusual, such as a Southern Cassowary, which can produce very low frequency sounds.

The problem is that filters can create a slightly unnatural sounding recordings, with low frequency noise cut-out but higher frequency noise remaining. I would therefore suggest that you apply a filter when facing problems with unwanted noise - if you have the mic tripod mounted (so no handling noise) and there is little wind or other noise, then perhaps you can get away without a filter - the more low level frequency noise you are hearing during monitoring, the higher the value of filter you can try.

It is also worth mentioning that a low cut filter applied in the field (mics and recorders can both have inbuilt filters) cannot ever be undone. Alternatively, you can create a substantially similar effect in many sound software packages, by using noise gates or equalizer effects. By altering the levels post production, you have the ability to 'undo' applied effects or vary effects until you have the sound you are most happy with.

Regards

Jon Bryant
 

horukuru

Here I Come !
Malaysia
Basically low cut filters reduce or eliminate noise below the selected frequency. Filters can be good at reducing low frequency noise from mic handling and wind.

Most birds vocalise well above 220hz, so the choice of filter will not directly impact the bird recording - that is unless you are trying to record something extremely unusual, such as a Southern Cassowary, which can produce very low frequency sounds.

The problem is that filters can create a slightly unnatural sounding recordings, with low frequency noise cut-out but higher frequency noise remaining. I would therefore suggest that you apply a filter when facing problems with unwanted noise - if you have the mic tripod mounted (so no handling noise) and there is little wind or other noise, then perhaps you can get away without a filter - the more low level frequency noise you are hearing during monitoring, the higher the value of filter you can try.

It is also worth mentioning that a low cut filter applied in the field (mics and recorders can both have inbuilt filters) cannot ever be undone. Alternatively, you can create a substantially similar effect in many sound software packages, by using noise gates or equalizer effects. By altering the levels post production, you have the ability to 'undo' applied effects or vary effects until you have the sound you are most happy with.

Regards

Jon Bryant
Usually I handhold the mic while recording and tried to be still but still visible handling noise. Would it be better to turn on the Low-cut Filter on the channel 3 (external mic) itself?
 

Jon.Bryant

Well-known member
Do you use a suspension system for the mic? if not then this may be worth looking at, as suspension systems isolate the mic and significant reduce handling noise. A combined suspension and windshield kit would make a difference for both handling and wind noise, but kits are quite expensive. Suspension only is much cheaper, but you may not be able to use a simple suspension system with a cheaper foam wind jammer, so use of the suspension may be limited, depending on the weather.

Alternatively it may be cheaper to use some form of mic support rather than holding the mic.

If neither of the above options is appealing, it's worth trying out the filter on the mic line, so see whether this improves things. At the highest filter frequency, you should see a reduction of or elimination of noise below 220Hz. Obviously - but unfortunately - any noise from handling above that frequency will not be reduced.

Regards

Jon
 

horukuru

Here I Come !
Malaysia
Do you use a suspension system for the mic? if not then this may be worth looking at, as suspension systems isolate the mic and significant reduce handling noise. A combined suspension and windshield kit would make a difference for both handling and wind noise, but kits are quite expensive. Suspension only is much cheaper, but you may not be able to use a simple suspension system with a cheaper foam wind jammer, so use of the suspension may be limited, depending on the weather.

Alternatively it may be cheaper to use some form of mic support rather than holding the mic.

If neither of the above options is appealing, it's worth trying out the filter on the mic line, so see whether this improves things. At the highest filter frequency, you should see a reduction of or elimination of noise below 220Hz. Obviously - but unfortunately - any noise from handling above that frequency will not be reduced.

Regards

Jon

So far no suspension system with the mic. But will get one once budget permitted...
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top