• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Terns at West Coast NP South Africa Sept (1 Viewer)

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
Hi,
I am have a great deal of difficulty trying to identify some Terns from peninsula of the West Coast National Park north of Yzerfontein.
Although some appear to have yellow tips to their black beaks, they also have red legs of varying lengths, so I trhink that rules out Sandwich Tern as they have black legs(?) I was wondering if any of these were Roseate or Antarctic Terns rather than migrant Common and Arctic Terns. Is the tern in flight a Damara Tern?

Many thanks for your help.
 

Attachments

  • ARD_3664.JPG
    ARD_3664.JPG
    152.4 KB · Views: 51
  • ARD_3722.JPG
    ARD_3722.JPG
    167.8 KB · Views: 44
  • ARD_3724.JPG
    ARD_3724.JPG
    143.4 KB · Views: 23
  • ARD_3730.JPG
    ARD_3730.JPG
    155.1 KB · Views: 20

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Tern in flight looks like Sandwich to me, including yellow bill tip.

The other three pics are too dark to make out, I'll try brightening in photoshop later.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Damara would be very uncommon (rare?) at WCNP I think Andy, they're not that easy at the site in Namibia where people go to see them.


A
 

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
Thanks guys. The Terns were all at WCNP, so that probably rules out Damara then! I'll see what I can do with breaking down and brightening the group shots
 

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
I brighten and isolated a few
 

Attachments

  • ARD_3721_edited-1.jpg
    ARD_3721_edited-1.jpg
    277.7 KB · Views: 19
  • ARD_3722_edited-1.jpg
    ARD_3722_edited-1.jpg
    433.9 KB · Views: 14
  • ARD_3726.JPG
    ARD_3726.JPG
    349.6 KB · Views: 16
  • ARD_3727.JPG
    ARD_3727.JPG
    259.8 KB · Views: 17
  • ARD_3730_edited-1.jpg
    ARD_3730_edited-1.jpg
    376.8 KB · Views: 18

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
I also found another photo of the tern in flight. Does this confirm it as Sandwich?
 

Attachments

  • ARD_3663.JPG
    ARD_3663.JPG
    117 KB · Views: 30
  • ARD_3730_edited-2.jpg
    ARD_3730_edited-2.jpg
    449.2 KB · Views: 31
Last edited:

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
The first photo of the second lot shows a bird with a much shorter bill, therefore I think there are more than one type here. The last photo of #7 shows what could possibly even 3 types going on bill size and head shape and I think the rearmost is the largest of the three.

I know that birds don't read field guides, butCommon and Arctic only arrive in October, so these would be either immatures of which a few stay over, or possibly Antarctic or Roseate that are either over wintering (April - November) or resident for the latter.

I have several field guides open in front of me and I still find it hard to distinguish between the tern species:-C
 
Last edited:
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
Warning! This thread is more than 4 years ago old.
It's likely that no further discussion is required, in which case we recommend starting a new thread. If however you feel your response is required you can still do so.

Users who are viewing this thread

Top