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Terns in Mexico, today (1 Viewer)

Valéry Schollaert

Respect animals, don't eat or wear their body or s
Hi all,

I have spent months in Ciudad del Carmen (Campeche, Mexico) and didn't see any Sterna untill today ! On this photo, you can see two Sterna on the left and I'd like your comment on their identification. I guess Forster's and Common are the two options.

Thanks very much.

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THE_FERN

Well-known member
Although the bills are quite thick, I think they must be common. The mantles are quite dark, the flight feathers seem to be and the bill colours are unlikely for Forster's
 

Valéry Schollaert

Respect animals, don't eat or wear their body or s
Thank you guys, I thought left bird had a Forter's look with long legs, thick bill, but I know Forster's only in breeding plumage. Good details to learn here !
 

smiths

Well-known member
Both birds are Forster's Terns.
In addition to bill shape, note, in the left hand bird, the pale, spotted crown against black eye mask.
In the central, closer bird, note the white underparts, broad and jagged white loral area, and strong grey wash on the tail.
I think we can even see the white outer edge of the outermost tail feather.
 

Valéry Schollaert

Respect animals, don't eat or wear their body or s
Both birds are Forster's Terns.
In addition to bill shape, note, in the left hand bird, the pale, spotted crown against black eye mask.
In the central, closer bird, note the white underparts, broad and jagged white loral area, and strong grey wash on the tail.
I think we can even see the white outer edge of the outermost tail feather.
Interesting, thank you. I was not confortable at all for the younger bird to be a Common that I had identified as a Forster's. For the other one, the real reason of my post, I find it difficult.

Cheers !
 

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