• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

The best North American, US, East Coast Hummingbird ID Reference Is ??? (1 Viewer)

sbarnhardt

32d Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
I'm contemplating purchasing myself a good hummingbird identification reference. I checked Amazon, thinking there might not be but a couple to choose from, but there are many, which leaves me wondering which would be the best to have. Of course, the more photos compared to the artwork, the better, but I realize I don't always get what I want. So, I'm asking what would you buy were you me.?

Thanks!

Barney
 

Rick Wright

Well-known member
Only one comes into question: Steve Howell's Hummingbirds of North America. You should be able to find it used.
 

peterginsburg

Well-known member
I'm contemplating purchasing myself a good hummingbird identification reference. I checked Amazon, thinking there might not be but a couple to choose from, but there are many, which leaves me wondering which would be the best to have. Of course, the more photos compared to the artwork, the better, but I realize I don't always get what I want. So, I'm asking what would you buy were you me.?

Thanks!

Barney
Also, of nearly the same vintage as Howell is Hummingbirds of North America by Sheri Williamson ISBN: 9780618024964.
 

Rick Wright

Well-known member
That book is almost impossible to use, a real (and absolutely uncharacteristic) design mess. I hear there is a revised edition in the works, which I'm greatly looking forward to.
 

sbarnhardt

32d Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
That book is almost impossible to use, a real (and absolutely uncharacteristic) design mess. I hear there is a revised edition in the works, which I'm greatly looking forward to.
When you say "that book", which one are you referring to?
 

Rick Wright

Well-known member
"Should."

Four species are accepted on the Nova Scotia list, four on the New Brunswick list, four on the Maine list, three on the New Hampshire list, six on the Massachusetts list, three on the Rhode Island list, six on the Connecticut list, five on the New York list, seven on the New Jersey list, five on the Delaware list, seven on the Pennsylvania list, seven on the Maryland list, eight on the Virginia list, eleven on the North Carolina list, ten on the South Carolina list, thirteen on the Georgia list, twelve on the Florida list . . . .
 
Last edited:

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
"Should."

Four species are accepted on the Nova Scotia list, four on the New Brunswick list, four on the Maine list, three on the New Hampshire list, six on the Massachusetts list, three on the Rhode Island list, six on the Connecticut list, five on the New York list, seven on the New Jersey list, five on the Delaware list, seven on the Pennsylvania list, seven on the Maryland list, eight on the Virginia list, eleven on the North Carolina list, ten on the South Carolina list, thirteen on the Georgia list, twelve on the Florida list . . . .
Yeah, but presumably the poster is relatively new to birding? In which case an advanced ID guide for birds that mostly don't regularly occur near him may cause more confusion than anything else. It's pretty easy to trick yourself when you are new to birding to seeing all sort of rare birds that aren't actually there.
 

raymie

Well-known member
United States
"Should."

Four species are accepted on the Nova Scotia list, four on the New Brunswick list, four on the Maine list, three on the New Hampshire list, six on the Massachusetts list, three on the Rhode Island list, six on the Connecticut list, five on the New York list, seven on the New Jersey list, five on the Delaware list, seven on the Pennsylvania list, seven on the Maryland list, eight on the Virginia list, eleven on the North Carolina list, ten on the South Carolina list, thirteen on the Georgia list, twelve on the Florida list . . . .
Yeah, and most of those will have only one or two records. At most those species might show one time per year in any of those states.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top