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The bird migration at the North Sea (1 Viewer)

BirdingGermany

New member
Germany
Hello,

very year in spring and autumn, waterfowl migrate in large flocks across the sky, in Central Europe's largest wadden sea national park. The migration of birds connects continents. Wading and waterfowl often have to travel many thousands of kilometers in "non-stop flight" to bridge the distance between suitable areas. A good 10 million geese, ducks, waders, gulls and terns use the unique natural space on the North Sea coast.

Many observation sites invite you to observe the impressive natural spectacle live. There are enough observation towers and huts where you can watch the birds in peace.

The grassland areas Krumhörn and the Dollart have a great importance as a resting and wintering area for Nordic geese, ducks and limicoles. Particularly noteworthy are the high populations of white-cheeked, coot and grey goose in autumn, which have their sleeping places in the Leybucht and in the Dollart and use the area as a feeding space.

The Rheiderland and the Dollart are an important resting area for Arctic geese, such as white-cheeked and coot geese, humpback and dwarf swans, as well as limicoles. On the partly damp to wet meadows, near Marienchor and Hatzumerfehn, there are still numerous lapwings, snipe, meadow pipit and redshanks.

Important flood resting places for thousands of birds, such as oystercatchers, spoonbills, fire geese, curlews, lapwings, redshanks, and other ducks and waders, are flood rest area Hilgenriedersiel, Nessmersiel, , Norddeich, Campen.
 
This is rather embarrassing (ich muss mich fremdschämen).
You call yourself Birding Germany and then use a translation programme to produce some absurd English bird names.
All you need to do is enter the name in German Wikipedia and click on English, or buy a Svensson.
Weißwangengans (white-cheeked) = Barnacle Goose
Bläßgans (coot goose) = Greater White-fronted Goose
Höckerschwan (humpback) = Mute Swan
Zwergschwan (dwarf) = Tundra Swan
Limikolen are called waders in British English and Shorebirds in American English.

John
 
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Love the "fire geese" !

presumably these are meant to be shelduck (Brandgans)....

I missed that one. :)
And the real minefield is where a direct translation gives you an existing but wrong species, e.g. Kohlmeise is not Coal Tit, Schwarzkopfmöwe is not Black-headed Gull, Heringsmöwe is not Herring Gull, Mittelmeermöwe is not Mediterranian Gull etc.

John
 
This is rather embarrassing (ich muss mich fremdschämen).
You call yourself Birding Germany and then use a translation programme to produce some absurd English bird names.
All you need to do is enter the name in German Wikipedia and click on English, or buy a Svensson.
Weißwangengans (white-cheeked) = Barnacle Goose
Bläßgans (coot goose) = Greater White-fronted Goose
Höckerschwan (humpback) = Mute Swan
Zwergschwan (dwarf) = Tundra Swan
Limikolen are called waders in British English and Shorebirds in American English.

John
To be fair to the OP, this happens to German journalists (including supposedly veteran ones) all the time, except it's the other way round - they produce horrible translations from English without even bothering to look up Wikipedia. And get paid for it.
 
To be fair to the OP, this happens to German journalists (including supposedly veteran ones) all the time, except it's the other way round - they produce horrible translations from English without even bothering to look up Wikipedia. And get paid for it.
Yes, but I wouldn't expect specialised knowledge from a journalist. It was just the presumtuous nick (Birding Germany) and the obvious lack of knowledge that irritated.
Btw, as a native English speaker, who started birding in Germany, I have found the combination of the birdforum gallery and Wikipedia to be very helful in learning the name translations. The Latin ones, unfortunately don't go much beyond my own nick. ;)

John
 
I missed that one. :)
And the real minefield is where a direct translation gives you an existing but wrong species, e.g. Kohlmeise is not Coal Tit, Schwarzkopfmöwe is not Black-headed Gull, Heringsmöwe is not Herring Gull, Mittelmeermöwe is not Mediterranian Gull etc.

John
The best way is check scientific name and look in wikipedia.
It even works for Japanese, because the write all bird names also in Katakana, even if the originally written in Kanji.
Of course German to English, best way is look into Svensson.

Buy the way also ornitho.de can be switched to English and even French !

also this is possible
 
Hello, I will do better with the translation. "Fire geese" for "Brandgans" (Tadorna tadorna) is a particularly beautiful translation. I had to do it quickly. As you can see, Google is not flawless.
Best regards.
 

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