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The CBR Checklist of Birds of China v1.0.1 (2010) (2 Viewers)

metroplex

Wei Qian
Dear Everybody,

A new Checklist of Birds of China is available online on 1 March 2010. Editing by the editors of China Bird Report book series, this list contains 1408 species that has occured in China. All species are given Scientific, English and Chinese names. It is the first checklist which adaptes the framework of the IOC World Checklist and absorbs several recent splits, new records and taxonomic changes, which reflects the recent phylogenetic and taxonomic works on Chinese birds. Appendix with species lists that distributes in Southern Tibet, Tianshan and Nansha Archipelagos are also available. This checklist will also play as the framework for the future publication of China Bird Report series.

The list is available at https://sites.google.com/site/cbrchinabirdlist/. Comments and remarks are welcome.


Wei Qian
 
Thanks, Wei Qian. A very useful resource!

[I've updated my Holarctic checklist accordingly – indications of splits recognised by China Ornithological Society now reflect CBR Checklist v1.0.1.]

Richard
 
I'm not sure, but genus Grammatoptila (and Ianthocincla too) should have been feminine gender and genus Leucodioptron should have been neuter gender (Timaliidae)
 
I'm not sure, but genus Grammatoptila (and Ianthocincla too) should have been feminine gender and genus Leucodioptron should have been neuter gender (Timaliidae)

Very appreciate for your indication, it seems we made some mistakes. We'll check it out and continue reviewing. Thanks for giving us more review and suggestions.:t:
 
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Changes in parrotbill taxonomy will be deferred until version 2.5 but are currently described in the footnotes for each species on the master list to be released shortly.

You folks sure pick up these changes quickly!

Sally
 
Paradoxornis split

Changes in parrotbill taxonomy will be deferred until version 2.5 but are currently described in the footnotes for each species on the master list to be released shortly.
You folks sure pick up these changes quickly!
Sally
...I guess you just wanted to save something good for us to look forward to next time. ;)

Richard
 
Red-faced Liocichla

I've just published a note re the status of "red-faced" liocichla in China on a different thread...
...what are the distinguishing characteristics of bakeri and ripponi (given that they are supposedly different species, one would hope that there are some differences)...
As far as the other one [L. phoenicea] is concerned, I have no idea if it has actually been seen in China.
I've only seen Red-faced Liocichla in Bhutan, so have no personal experience of the situation in China.

But L. ripponi (incl ssp wellsi) is recognised by Collar & Robson 2007 (HBW12, and therefore also IBC), IOC & TIF.

Collar & Robson 2007:
  • "Differs from similar L. phoenicea in having crimson of face replaced by much brighter scarlet extending clearly over eye, onto lores and over malar area to chin, black lateral crownstripe vestigial, crown greyer, underparts paler, undertail browner."
You probably have China Bird Report 2007, which notes:
  • "Following the recognition of L. ripponi as a full species (see below), the now diminished L. phoenicea comprises two subspecies: nominate phoenicea and L. p. bakeri, the former occurring in the Gaoligong Shan range of northwest Yunnan and the latter in west Yunnan (Collar and Robson 2007). The ranges of the subspecies given by these authors, however, do not fully match the distribution described by Cheng (1987), who does not list the nominate subspecies for China and maps L. p. bakeri (and not the nominate) in the Gaoligong Shan. It is at present unclear whether this species occurs in the Ruili area, as L. r. ripponi is known to, and also which of these species occurs at Tengchong.

    ...[L. ripponi] is now regarded as a separate species following Collar and Robson (2007). These authors list two subspecies, both occurring in China, ripponi in west and southwest Yunnan and L. r. wellsi in southeast Yunnan and parts of Guangxi. According to Cheng (1987), ripponi occurs in west Yunnan at Longling and in southwest Yunnan at Yongde, whilst wellsi occurs in southeast Yunnan."
Richard
 
Thanks Richard

That sounds very neat and tidy, however:

The Liocichla in western Yunnan that I and others (pers comm.) have seen is Rippon's, NOT bakeri (Contra HBW, and Collar and Robson).

My pics are here: http://www.chinesecurrents.com/2010birds21.html

As far as the Gaoligongshan is concerned, I know that certain authors have suggested it but I have seen no confirmation that phoenicea is the taxa there. I saw a small party of "red-faced" Liocichla a few weeks ago at about 1600 masl there, but had inconclusive views.

So, the question I have is: Has anyone actually seen phoenicea (or bakeri) in the Gaoligongshan, or anywhere in China for that matter??

if anyone has seen one, please shout, so I can have the pleasure of adding it to The BBBC China list.

Cheers!

Shi Jin
 
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