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The Descriptions of the Fossil Record of Birds (2 Viewers)

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
I like to ask the moderator to make this thread a "sticky".

This thread is ment to give an clear possibility for everyone to find the description of any fossil birdspecies.

I think it is complete, but it is always possible that I missed something. On this site you can give additions, give suggestiona, ask questions, I will try to answer them as good as I can.

Finally, I hope you have enjoyed the series. I certainly enjoyed the help given by Laurent and others.

Here follows the list of threads in this series.

For descriptions of all fossil Avialae (Protoavidae; Incertae Sedis; Scansoriopterygidae; Praeornithidae; Incertae Sedis) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Archaeopterygidae, Jeholornithiformes and Yandangornithiformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Rahonaviformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Confuciusornithiformes and Incertae Sedis see:

For descriptions of all fossil Sapeornithiformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Enantiornithes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Euornithes (Incertae Sedis, Vorones, Mystiornithiformes, Patagopterygiformes, Apsaraviiformes, Ambiornithiformes, Yanornithiformes -- Apatornithiformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Neornithes (Palaeognathae) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Neognathae (Galloanserae, Galliformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Anserimorphae (Gastornithiformes, Anseriformes) see:

For descriptions of all Anserimorphae - 2 (Vegaviiformes; Odontopterygiformes)
see:

For descriptions of all fossil Neoaves (Gaviiformes, Podicipediformes and Phoenicopteriformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Procellariimorphae (Sphenisciformes and Procellariiformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Stegano-Grallatores (Balaenicipitiformes, Phaethontiformes, Pelecaniformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Ciconiimorphae see:

For descriptions of all fossil Terrestrornithes (Cariamiformes, Otidiformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Gruiformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Ralliformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Turniciformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Charadriiformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Charadriides see:

For descriptions of all fossil Lari see:

For descriptions of all fossil Dendrornithes (Accipitriformes and allies) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Strigiformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Anomalogonates (Opithocomiformes, Musophagiformes, Cuculiformes, Leptosomiformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Columbiformes see:

For descriptions of all fossil Strisores (Caprimulgiformes, Incertae Sedis, Steatornithiformes, Podargiformes, Aegotheliformes, Apodiformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Trogones (Coliiformes, Trogoniformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Pico-Clamatores (Upupiformes, Bucerotiformes, Coraciiformes, Piciformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Telluraves (Incertae Sedis, Falconiformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Psittacopasseres (Psittaciformes and close allies) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Passerimorphae (Incertae Sedis, Passeriformes) see:

For descriptions of all fossil Neornithes Incertae Sedis (Aves Incertae Sedis, Nomina Nuda) see:

Enjoy,

Fred
 
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Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Correction:

The correct link to descriptions of all fossil Neognathae (Galloanserae, Galliformes) is:

Descriptions of all fossil Neognathae

All birds not mentioned so far belong to this group. For descriptions of all fossil Avialae (Protoavidae; Incertae Sedis; Scansoriopterygidae; Praeornithidae; Incertae Sedis) see: Descriptions of all fossil Avialae For descriptions of all fossil...
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I am still wondered why do you put Aratinga vorohuensis and Vanellus downsi in Nandayus and Belonopterus?
they are considered synonyms of Aratinga and Vanellus.
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
I am still wondered why do you put Aratinga vorohuensis and Vanellus downsi in Nandayus and Belonopterus?
they are considered synonyms of Aratinga and Vanellus.
Nandayus vorohuensis was described in Nandayus Bonaparte, 1854 by Eduardo P. Tonni & Jorge Noriega in 1996. Since nobody transferred it to Aratinga Spix, 1824.

Vanellus downsi (Campbell, 2002) was described by Kenneth E. Campbell, Jr. in 2002 as Belonopterus downsi Campbell, 2002, but I treat Belonopterus Reichenbach, 1852 as a subgenus of Vanellus Brisson, 1760 so I transferred it to Vanellus Brisson, 1760.

Fred
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Nandayus is a synonym of Aratinga, according to a phylogenetic analysis.
If that is the case I have missed the paper, so give me the reference or the paper itself and I will see if I have to change my opinion, although I doubt whether in that paper Nandayus vorohuensis was taken into consideration, neornithologists allmost never take into account fossil species when they revise modern genera.

On the Belonopterus question you have a point, osteologically seen there are differences between Belonopterus and Vanellus, but I am not sure those differences are enough to justify two (or more) different genera.

Fred
 
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Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
This is the paper regarding Nandayus as a synonym.
Thanks for the reference.

Unfortunatle I can only read the abstract, but it seems you are right, I will adjust it.

Fred
 
Usually I transfer some fossil bird taxa without research papers because i want to make classification more clear. IOC transfers Anas marecula to Mareca without a research too, see the taxonomic updates by IOC.

Why i don’t want to definitely say Grus cubensis belongs to Antigone prior to the study in 2020 because a species of Grus is native to America, if the genus is entirely absent in the Americas then G. cubensis will definitely be in Antigone in Wikipedia.
 
Usually I transfer some fossil bird taxa without research papers because i want to make classification more clear. IOC transfers Anas marecula to Mareca without a research too, see the taxonomic updates by IOC.

Why i don’t want to definitely say Grus cubensis belongs to Antigone prior to the study in 2020 because a species of Grus is native to America, if the genus is entirely absent in the Americas then G. cubensis will definitely be in Antigone in Wikipedia.
This is also why Wikipedia and Biolib places Nandayus vorohuensis as Aratinga vorohuensis although other authors still place it as Nandayus at that time.
 
Hey Ruhe, I did see some of your taxonomic status in your list but those are outdated. Some of taxa are synonyms, or some have been revised. You may or may not know it, but i'm giving you some references.

Here are the references of the taxonomic changes on Pacific ground doves: Systematics and biogeography of Indo-Pacific ground-doves | Request PDF
A reconsideration of Gallicolumba (Aves: Columbidae) relationships using fresh source material reveals pseudogenes, chimeras, and a novel phylogenetic hypothesis | Request PDF

Gallirallus hodgenorum was also changed to Tribonyx, there are references but you may or may not read it. There is a page in the bird name etymology which warrants about this, see here:Tribonyx hodgenorum Olson, 1986

Anas marecula was changed to Marecula by IOC, see their websites and click the taxonomic updates to find out.
 
Bruce (2016) also determines the taxonomic change on Pacific ground doves, which indicates the genus name Pampusana has priority over Alopecoenas.
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands


Unfortunately I so not have the paper but the abstract makes it clear that they are mainly talking about extant species, not all the extinct ones.

Abstract Jensson, Irestedt, Bowie & Christidis, 2011

Ground-doves represent an insular bird radiation distributed across the Indo-Pacific. The radiation comprises sixteen extant species, two species believed to be extinct and six species known to be extinct. In the present study, we present a molecular phylogeny for all sixteen extant species, based on two mitochondrial markers. We demonstrate that the Gallicolumba as currently circumscribed is not monophyletic and recommend reinstalling the name Alopecoenas for a monophyletic radiation comprising ten extant species, distributed in New Guinea, the Lesser Sundas and Oceania. Gallicolumba remains the name for six species confined to New Guinea the Philippines and Sulawesi. Although our phylogenetic analyses fail to support a single origin for the remaining Gallicolumba species, we suspect that the addition of nuclear sequence data may alter this result. Because a number of ground-dove taxa have gone extinct, it is difficult to assess biogeographical patterns. However, the Alopecoenas clade has clearly colonized many remote oceanic islands rather recently, with several significant water crossings. The Gallicolumba radiation(s), on the other hand, is significantly older and it is possible that diversification within that group may in part have been shaped by plate tectonics and corresponding re-arrangements of land masses within the Philippine and Sulawesi region.

And by the way, I did not give you permission to address me with "Hey Ruhe" you can call me mr. Ruhe or Fred. I will stop answering your messages becouse I don't correspond with people who hide behind a pseudonym and certainly not when they get offensive.

Fred
 
Fred, I wonder where you get the links of the papers describing some taxa like Botaurus hibbardi and Chunga incerta? I can't get the link of those papers anywhere else.
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Germany
The OD of Botaurus hibbardi is free available

Moseley, Carolyn, and Alan Feduccia. "Upper Pliocene herons and ibises from North America." University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology 12 (1975): 71-74.



The OD of Chunga incerta is in Spanish and also free available

 

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