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The Hidden World of Dinosaurs (1 Viewer)

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Not yet mentioned, The Anatomical Record April 2020 special issue on dinosaurs now has free access to all papers. These These are the final citation forms with free pdf links. Some are bird related (in bold)

The Anatomical Record 303(4) Special Issue:The Hidden World of Dinosaurs
(April 2020)

https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/19328494/2020/303/4

Jeffrey T. Laitman & Kurt H. Albertine (2020)
Dinosaurs Again Thunder into the Pages of The Anatomical Record in a Special Issue Exploring their Hidden Worlds.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 641-644
doi: https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.24383
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24383
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24383

Brandon P. Hedrick & Peter Dodson (2020)
Paleobiology in the 21st Century.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 645-648
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24384
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24384
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24384

Peter Dodson (2020)
Generations: Tracking American Paleontology and Anatomy Over 17 Decades
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 649-655
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24375
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24375Free pdf:
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24375

W. Scott Persons IV, Philip J. Currie & Gregory M. Erickson (2020)
An Older and Exceptionally Large Adult Specimen of Tyrannosaurus rex.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 656-672
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24118
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24118
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24118

Jordan C. Mallon, Jonathan R. Bura, Dirk Schumann & Philip J. Currie (2020)
A Problematic Tyrannosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) Skeleton and Its Implications for Tyrannosaurid Diversity in the Horseshoe Canyon Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of Alberta
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 673-690
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24118
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24118
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24118

Philip J. Currie & David C. Evans (2020)
Cranial Anatomy of New Specimens of Saurornitholestes langstoni (Dinosauria, Theropoda, Dromaeosauridae) from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Campanian) of Alberta
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 691-715
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24241
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24241
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24241

Luis M. Chiappe, Liu Di, Francisco J. Serrano, Zhang Yuguang & Qingjin Meng (2020)
Anatomy and Flight Performance of the Early Enantiornithine Bird Protopteryx fengningensis: Information from New Specimens of the Early Cretaceous Huajiying Formation of China.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 716-731
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24322
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24322
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24322

Michael D. D'Emic & Matthew T. Carrano (2020)
Redescription of Brachiosaurid Sauropod Dinosaur Material From the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Colorado, USA.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 732-758
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24198
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24198
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24198

Qian-Nan Zhang, Tao Wang, Zhi-Wen Yang & Hai-Lu You (2020)
Redescription of the Cranium of Jingshanosaurus xinwaensis (Dinosauria: Sauropodomorpha) from the Lower Jurassic Lufeng Formation of Yunnan Province, China.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 759-771
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24113
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24113
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24113

Ya-Ming Wang, Tao Wang, Zhi-Wen Yang & Hai-Lu You (2020)
Cranium and Vertebral Column of Xingxiulong chengi (Dinosauria: Sauropodomorpha) from the Early Jurassic of China.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 772-789
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24305
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24305
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24305

Yu-Guang Zhang, Ke-Bai Wang, Shu-Qing Chen, Di Liu & Hai Xing (2020)
Osteological Re-Assessment and Taxonomic Revision of "Tanius laiyangensis" (Ornithischia: Hadrosauroidea) from the Upper Cretaceous of Shandong, China
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 790-800
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24097
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24097
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24097

Christopher R. Noto, Stephanie K. Drumheller, Thomas L. Adams & Alan H. Turner (2020)
An Enigmatic Small Neosuchian Crocodyliform from the Woodbine Formation of Texas.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 801-812
doi: Âhttps://doi/10.1002/ar.24174
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24174
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24174

Sterling J. Nesbitt, Max C. Langer & Martin D. Ezcurra (2020)
The Anatomy of Asilisaurus kongwe, a Dinosauriform from the Lifua Member of the Manda Beds (~Middle Triassic) of Africa.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 813-873
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24287
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24287
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24287

Emma R. Schachner, Randall B. Irmis, Adam K. Huttenlocker, Kent Sanders, Robert L. Cieri & Sterling J. Nesbitt (2020)
Osteology of the Late Triassic Bipedal Archosaur Poposaurus gracilis (Archosauria: Pseudosuchia) from Western North America
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 874-917
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24298
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24298
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24298

Gregory F. Funston, Ryan D. Wilkinson, D. Jade Simon, Aaron H. Leblanc, Mateusz Wosik & Philip J. Currie (2020)
Histology of Caenagnathid (Theropoda, Oviraptorosauria) Dentaries and Implications for Development, Ontogenetic Edentulism, and Taxonomy.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 918-934
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24205
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24205
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24205

Brandon P. Hedrick, Erika Goldsmith, Hector Rivera-Sylva, Anthony R. Fiorillo, Allison R. Tumarkin-Deratzian & Peter Dodson (2020)
Filling in Gaps in the Ceratopsid Histologic Database: Histology of Two Basal Centrosaurines and an Assessment of the Utility of Rib Histology in the Ceratopsidae.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 935-948
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24099
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24099
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24099

Anusuya Chinsam, Jesús Marugán-Lobón, Francisco J. Serrano & Luis Chiappe (2020)
Osteohistology and Life History of the Basal Pygostylian, Confuciusornis sanctus.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 949-962
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24282
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24282
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24282

Ashley W. Poust, Chunling Gao, David J. Varricchio, Jianlin Wu & Fengjiao Zhang (2020)
A new microraptorine theropod from the Jehol Biota and growth in early dromaeosaurids.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 963-987
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24343
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24343
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24343

Victoria M. Arbour & Lindsay E. Zanno (2020)
Tail Weaponry in Ankylosaurs and Glyptodonts: An Example of a Rare but Strongly Convergent Phenotype.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 988-998
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24093
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24093
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24093

Ian N. Cost, Kevin M. Middleton, Kaleb C. Sellers, Michael Scott Echols, Lawrence M. Witmer, Julian L. Davis & Casey M. Holliday (2020)
Palatal Biomechanics and Its Significance for Cranial Kinesis in Tyrannosaurus rex.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 999-1017
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24219
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24219
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24219

Delphine Angst, Jonathan Barnoud, Raphaël Cornette & Anusuya Chinsamy (2020)
Sex and Ontogenetic Variation in the Crest of Numida meleagris: Implications for Crested Vertebrates.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1018-1034
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24275
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24275
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24275

Christopher R. Torres, Mark A. Norell & Julia A. Clarke (2020)
Estimating Flight Style of Early Eocene Stem Palaeognath Bird Calciavis grandei (Lithornithidae)
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1035-1042
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24207
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24207
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24207

Matthew McKeown, Stephen L. Brusatte, Thomas E. Williamson, Julia A. Schwab, Thomas D. Carr, Ian B. Butler, Amy Muir, Katlin Schroeder, Michelle A. Espy, James F. Hunter, Adrian S. Losko, Ronald O. Nelson, D. Cort Gautier & Sven C. Vogel (2020)
Neurosensory and Sinus Evolution as Tyrannosauroid Dinosaurs Developed Giant Size: Insight from the Endocranial Anatomy of Bistahieversor sealeyi.;
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1043-1059
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24374
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24374
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24374

Casey M. Holliday, William Ruger Porter, Kent A. Vliet & Lawrence M. Witmer (2020)
The Frontoparietal Fossa and Dorsotemporal Fenestra of Archosaurs and Their Significance for Interpretations of Vascular and Muscular Anatomy in Dinosaurs.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1060-1074
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24218
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24218
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24218

William Ruger Porter & Lawrence M. Witmer (2020)
Vascular Patterns in the Heads of Dinosaurs: Evidence for Blood Vessels, Sites of Thermal Exchange, and Their Role in Physiological Thermoregulatory Strategies.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1075-1103
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24234
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24234
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24234

Ali Nabavizadeh (2020)
Cranial Musculature in Herbivorous Dinosaurs: A Survey of Reconstructed Anatomical Diversity and Feeding Mechanisms.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1104-1145
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24283
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24283
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24283

Walter S. Persons & Philip J. Currie (2020)
The Anatomical and Functional Evolution of the Femoral Fourth Trochanter in Ornithischian Dinosaurs.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1146-1157
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24094
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24094
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24094

Christopher T. Griffin & Sterling J. Nesbitt (2020)
Does the Maximum Body Size of Theropods Increase across the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary? Integrating Ontogeny, Phylogeny, and Body Size.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1158-1169
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24130
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24130
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24130

Enjoy,

Fred
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
The bird papers

Luis M. Chiappe, Liu Di, Francisco J. Serrano, Zhang Yuguang & Qingjin Meng (2020)
Anatomy and Flight Performance of the Early Enantiornithine Bird Protopteryx fengningensis: Information from New Specimens of the Early Cretaceous Huajiying Formation of China.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 716-731
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24322
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24322
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24322

ABSTRACT

The Early Cretaceous (131 Million Years Ago) Protopteryx fengningensisis one of the oldest and most primitive enantiornithine birds; however, knowl-edge of its anatomy has largely been limited to the succinct description of two specimens (holotype and paratype). This study describes two new specimens of P. fengningensis preserving most of the skeleton and plumage, and it there-fore adds significantly to understanding the morphology of this important species and the character evolution of enantiornithine birds. The well-preserved plumage of these specimens also affords a quantitative assessment of the flight performance of P. fengningensis. Our aerodynamic considerations indicate that this early enantiornithine was capable of intermittent flight(bounding or flap-gliding), thus marking the earliest occurrence of suchenergy-saving aerial strategy.

Fred
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Anusuya Chinsam, Jesús Marugán-Lobón, Francisco J. Serrano & Luis Chiappe (2020)
Osteohistology and Life History of the Basal Pygostylian, Confuciusornis sanctus.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 949-962
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24282
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24282
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24282

ABSTRACT

More than a thousand specimens of Confuciusornis sanctus have beenrecovered from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group of Northeastern China. Here, we investigate the bone microstructure of 33 long bones sampled from 14 C. sanctus specimens in an attempt to assess the life history patterns of this basal pygostylian bird. Analysis of the histology of various skeletal elements (femur, humerus, tibia, radius, and ulna) revealed differences in the histology of their bone walls. Based on the osteohistology, we coded the examined specimens into five histology age classes. We found that histological age was not strictly correlated with body size. The variability in the histology of multiple bones from single skeletons suggests differences in the growth rate of the skeleton in response to allometry, functional demands, and pathology. We show that although fibrolamellar bone is widespread across birds, the extent and duration of this rapid phase of bone deposition is highly variable. Comparisons among Mesozoic birds confirm that early ontogenetic growth was rapid, but that later posthatching growth was strongly influenced by the ontogenetic age of the individual, body size, and local environment, as well as taxonomy. Our findings indicate that C. sanctus experienced rapid growth from early ontogeny until almost fully grown, and thereafter transitioned to slow, episodic growth (for at least 3–4 years) to reach skeletal maturity.

Fred
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Delphine Angst, Jonathan Barnoud, Raphaël Cornette & Anusuya Chinsamy (2020)
Sex and Ontogenetic Variation in the Crest of Numida meleagris: Implications for Crested Vertebrates.
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1018-1034
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24275
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24275
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24275

ABSTRACT

Crested vertebrates are known from a wide variety of modern and fossil taxa, however, the actual formation and function of the crest is stilldebatable. Among modern birds, the globally distributed guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) is characterized by having a cranial bony crest (overlain by keratin), but surprisingly little is known about its development. Here, we studied the crest of 202 wild guinea fowl from the same population, using anatomical measurements as well as 2D-morphometry. Our results show that juveniles have smaller skulls than adults and have smaller, simpler crests that are visible even in very young individuals. Among adults, female skulls are smaller than males, and they have smaller, simpler shaped crests, which permit a discrimination between the sexes of 93% when the keratin is preserved with the bony crest, and of 89% when only the bony crest is available. By extrapolation, these results confirm that the crest can be used as an ontogenetic character, as well as for sex discrimination in the fossil record. Our results also show that the overlying keratin does not always mimic the underlying bony crest, which should be considered when reconstructing extinct crested vertebrates.

Fred
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Christopher R. Torres, Mark A. Norell & Julia A. Clarke (2020)
Estimating Flight Style of Early Eocene Stem Palaeognath Bird Calciavis grandei (Lithornithidae)
The Anatomical Record 303(4): 1035-1042
doi: https://doi/10.1002/ar.24207
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24207
Free pdf:
https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ar.24207

ABSTRACT

Lithornithids are volant stem palaeognaths from the Paleocene-Eocene.Except for these taxa and the extant neotropical tinamous, all other known extinct and extant palaeognaths are flightless. Investigation of properties of the lithornithid wing and its implications for inference of flight style informs understood locomotor diversity within Palaeognathae and may have implications for estimation of ancestral traits in the clade. Qualitative comparisons with their closest extant volant relatives, the burstflying tinamous, previously revealed skeletal differences suggesting lithornithids were capable of sustained flight, but quantitative work on wing morphology have been lacking. Until com-paratively recently, specimens of lithornithids preserving wing feather remains have been limited. Here, we reconstruct the wing of an exceptionally preservedspecimen of the Early Eocene lithornithid Calciavis grandei and estimate bodymass, wing surface area, and wing span. We then estimate flight parametersand compare our estimates with representatives from across Aves in a statistical framework. We predict that flight in C. grandei was likely marked bycontinuous flapping, and that lithornithids were capable of sustained flight and migratory behavior. Our results are consistent with previous hypotheses that the ancestor of extant Palaeognathae may also have been capable of sustained flight.

Fred
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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