• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

The Highlands and Islands Thread (1 Viewer)

Capercaillie71

Well-known member
Over 15 reeling Groppers this morning - what a spring for them!

Agree it really is an amazing spring for Groppers...they were all over the place on Morvern earlier this week, never heard so many up here and they seem to be spreading well east too.

I know it's not in the Highlands and Islands but I heard 6 reeling yesterday near Inverbervie in Aberdeenshire (or Kincardineshire if you want to be traditional), all within 2km of each other. That's more than I've heard in Aberdeenshire in the last 4 years! One of them gave superb views on top of a gorse bush only 10 metres away - the best views I've ever had.
 

Cornish Chough

Well-known member
Again not the Highlands but heard several on Mull last week whilst on holiday. In particular around Grasspoint & Scallastle.

Great place and great weather as well.
 

jpoyner

Well-known member
Scotland
I am appalled !!

http://archiesbirding.blogspot.com/2011/04/highland-spring-day-two-where-eagles.html

Our early morning stroll then got even better when a female Capercaillie was flushed from amongst a damp patch of bilberry. As we headed deeper into the forest the silence was broken by the 'champagne cork popping' of a distant male. As we made our way carefully towards the origins of the strange sound we then picked up another two male Capercaillie as they stood motionless in the distance. As we absorbed the atmosphere one of the birds then took flight
:C
 
Last edited:

Ben Nevis

Registered User
Supporter
Scotland
I am appalled !!

http://archiesbirding.blogspot.com/2011/04/highland-spring-day-two-where-eagles.html

Our early morning stroll then got even better when a female Capercaillie was flushed from amongst a damp patch of bilberry. As we headed deeper into the forest the silence was broken by the 'champagne cork popping' of a distant male. As we made our way carefully towards the origins of the strange sound we then picked up another two male Capercaillie as they stood motionless in the distance. As we absorbed the atmosphere one of the birds then took flight
:C

As am I.What an Idiot. :C
 

peteh

Well-known member
Can I just check to see what your supposed to do? (for next week)
Is it if your walking in a forest and hear a male calling do you turn round and go back or do you just need to stick to your path your on and your ok?
Last thing we want to do is disturb any bird let alone Capercallies.
 

jpoyner

Well-known member
Scotland
Can I just check to see what your supposed to do? (for next week)
Is it if your walking in a forest and hear a male calling do you turn round and go back or do you just need to stick to your path your on and your ok?
Last thing we want to do is disturb any bird let alone Capercallies.

Stick to the main paths only, observe signs and don't enter any woods in known Caper breeding areas before 8am. With the great weather we've been having I think the males have pretty much stopped lekking now anyway.
 
Last edited:

Jaff

Registered Member
I seriously doubt he'd appreciate the kind of comment I'd want to leave on his blog after reading that. I hope he reads these posts to realise what an arrogant numpty he is, as he's a member.
 

Robin Edwards

Well-known member
I spent last week in Scotland and found the need to challenge quite a few dog walkers who didn't want to comply with the messages on the sign posts that requested use of dog leads during the breeding season. All complied but one was particularly unhappy that this meant her.

From what I saw, I think mostly holiday makers from the south rather than locals in my case.

A new code of practice needs to be enforced so I would encourage all birders and photographers alike to challenge offenders wherever encountered.

Robin
 

Marcus Conway - ebirder

Well-known member
I've now read the guys blog as I asnwered via mobile yesterday, and he does mention in it that he recommended to other birders to visit Loch G for Capercaillie.

Many years ago I did pretty similar to what he did without knowing much better or thinking I was doing any harm. So I am reluctant to have a go without knowing the full story. the guy seems to have links to conservation charities etc so does seem to care about birds.

There are probably two sides to the story though there is a very obvious problem with disturbance and as I said yesterday it is illegal to disturb Capers during the lek.
 

jpoyner

Well-known member
Scotland
I've now read the guys blog as I asnwered via mobile yesterday, and he does mention in it that he recommended to other birders to visit Loch G for Capercaillie.

Many years ago I did pretty similar to what he did without knowing much better or thinking I was doing any harm. So I am reluctant to have a go without knowing the full story. the guy seems to have links to conservation charities etc so does seem to care about birds.

There are probably two sides to the story though there is a very obvious problem with disturbance and as I said yesterday it is illegal to disturb Capers during the lek.

The wood in question has clear information signs regarding minimising Caper disturbance, which were either missed (which I find hard to believe) or ignored.
 
Last edited:

Ben Nevis

Registered User
Supporter
Scotland
As JP points out,the woods have several displays regarding sensitive areas for Capercaillie and polite request to stay out,of the areas fenced off.This was certainly the case,the last time I visited in January,so I would Imagine they are still there.

I thought the "Birdwatchers Code" stated,"The birds welfare comes first at all times".Sadly,too many people think they are above such advice.
 

Marcus Conway - ebirder

Well-known member
There are clear signs at the site now I have read where it is. I wasn't trying to defend the guy (I don't know him). I detest birders (and photographers, dog walkers etc) belief that they decide to think that notices and guidance doesn't apply to them.
 

Capercaillie71

Well-known member
Many years ago I did pretty similar to what he did without knowing much better or thinking I was doing any harm.

I remember your report of that trip and have just searched for it and read it again. I think that you visited in June, well after the lekking period was over, so you probably weren't doing any harm. By contrast, the report linked to in the earlier post appears to suggest that the individual was wandering around the forest in the third week of April which is the peak lekking period for capercaillie, when most hens are mated.
 

Capercaillie71

Well-known member
I am appalled !!

http://archiesbirding.blogspot.com/2011/04/highland-spring-day-two-where-eagles.html

Our early morning stroll then got even better when a female Capercaillie was flushed from amongst a damp patch of bilberry. As we headed deeper into the forest the silence was broken by the 'champagne cork popping' of a distant male. As we made our way carefully towards the origins of the strange sound we then picked up another two male Capercaillie as they stood motionless in the distance. As we absorbed the atmosphere one of the birds then took flight
:C

I am reliably informed that Northern Constabulary's wildlife officers have been looking into the incident described in the link above. I seriously doubt that there would be sufficient evidence for them to take any action, but for anyone visiting the area, please remember that disturbing capercaillie at the lek is no different in the eyes of the law from disturbing an eagle or any other schedule 1 bird at its nest.
 

Jaff

Registered Member
I am reliably informed that Northern Constabulary's wildlife officers have been looking into the incident described in the link above. I seriously doubt that there would be sufficient evidence for them to take any action, but for anyone visiting the area, please remember that disturbing capercaillie at the lek is no different in the eyes of the law from disturbing an eagle or any other schedule 1 bird at its nest.

Glad to hear it. Maybe nothing comes of it but a stern warning from the police or even just their inquiries should remind the offender and anyone else reading this that such behaviour carries serious consequences. Is it really worth it I ask?
 

Dmacaskill

Well-known member
I have just seen this and i am really shocked by this idiots behaviour! walking off the beaten track through any known Caper site throughout the year only adds more pressure on this birds very fragile existence and should in my opinion be avoided. Can't believe this guys ignorance.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top