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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

The Remarkable Svbony SV202 10 x 42 ED Binocular (1 Viewer)

Dipperdapper

Active member
Cheers Ratal.

You betcha; it was a very pleasant surprise. I honestly don't know how they pulled it off but nonetheless, there it is!

Best wishes,

Neil.
 
Hello Everyone,

I thought you might be interested in my review of a most remarkable binocular I recently purchased and tested; the Svbony SV202 10x 42 ED


Hope you find it of interest,

Kind Regards,

Neil.
Neil, I have got to say your review of the Svbony is a clear indication that you don’t have to spend a fortune to obtain remarkable optics. thank for sharing your experience with both the 8x32 and 10x42! The 10x50Ed should be a winner too!
 

Dipperdapper

Active member
Thanks for the feedback Optics field test. I am indebted to you for taking that leap of faith and capturing some video footage of both the 8 x 32 and 10 x 42 ED models.






I'm terribly old school, but I may have to come kickin' and screamin' into the 21st century!o_O

Kind regards

Neil,
 

Canip

Well-known member
Hello again,

Quick update: Binoculars Today performed their own tests on the Svbony SV 202 10 x 42 ED and informed me of their results:


Kind Regards,

Neil.
Sorry to correct you, Neil.

The rating on BINOCULARS TODAY‘s website is based on initial inspection, my own measurements and a few days of usage of the binocular.

What you call „tests“ is for me a detailed and structured review process the results of which are published under the heading „Reviews“. This procedure has not occurred yet and no review published.

Just to be sure we talk about the same things.

Canip
 

Dipperdapper

Active member
Sorry to correct you, Neil.

The rating on BINOCULARS TODAY‘s website is based on initial inspection, my own measurements and a few days of usage of the binocular.

What you call „tests“ is for me a detailed and structured review process the results of which are published under the heading „Reviews“. This procedure has not occurred yet and no review published.

Just to be sure we talk about the same things.

Canip
Hello Canip,

Thanks for the clarification here and apologies for the equivocation,

With best wishes,

Neil.
 

Canip

Well-known member
A brief note about price:
In Switzerland, where I bought my 202 10x42 ED a few days ago for CHF 150.00, the bino is no offered by the same merchant for CHF 219.00, a 50% increase. Maybe we ought to stop speaking so positively about this bino … 😉
 

Binastro

Well-known member
A Swiss Franc seems to be 0.79p GB.

In the 1960s I was in Arosa for four days.
Then it snowed 3 metres of snow.
We couldn't get out of the place for another 4 days.
When we did the small narrow track train derailed on top of a high perilous open track viaduct.
Somehow they got this train back on the track after a few hours.
I thought we might fall to our demise.

While we waited in Arosa for the snow to stop I bought a Sun zoom lens for Minolta.
Zoom lenses were very uncommon in England, and the Swiss price was good.

The air was beautifully clean at 3,000m height and the Seeing great.

There was a skiier who went down the steep main road at an incredible speed, did a turn of about 130 degrees onto a smaller road and disappeared.
What I saw I thought was impossible for a human, but it happened.

I took skiing lessons, but the results were not good.

Regards,
B.
 
A brief note about price:
In Switzerland, where I bought my 202 10x42 ED a few days ago for CHF 150.00, the bino is no offered by the same merchant for CHF 219.00, a 50% increase. Maybe we ought to stop speaking so positively about this bino … 😉
OUCH!!! CHF219 =$Aus330! On Amazon Australia the price went up to $Aus180 (CHF115) from the $Aus104 less than 2 weeks ago (although that was a discounted special at $115 less a 10% off coupon) . Those prices are from a supplier named Retevis which seems to be Svbony's parent company (Shenzhen Retevis Technology). They claim to have distribution centres in the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Spain so availability in Europe should be good. Canip did you buy from the official Svbony Amazon store or via eBay? I notice that a lot of the prices on eBay Australia are considerably higher.

Another problem is that there are a lot of problems currently with getting product out of China to overseas markets, starting with Covid shutdowns of the factories and their suppliers through to shipping shortages pushing up freight rates. Just look at the 2 years of delays APM has had in actually receiving their new 6x30ED bins. If you're a business that doesn't know when you're going to get the next resupply it doesn't make sense to discount your existing stock. This situation doesn't look like improving any time soon. China is currently ordering industries to shut down because of power rationing due to coal shortages and the early onset of winter.

From the Financial Times - China’s energy crisis threatens lengthy disruption to global supply chain

"Factory owners in China and their customers worldwide have been told to prepare for power supply disruptions becoming part of life as President Xi Jinping doggedly weans the world’s second-biggest economy off its dependence on coal. Months of shortages have cut power to households in China’s north-east and caused outages at factories across the country. But energy demand is still surging amid record demand for Chinese exports, and the problems will be compounded by the prospect of freezing temperatures in winter. Despite a flurry of central government interventions, spearheaded by premier Li Keqiang, Chinese manufacturers and multinationals alike have been urged to boost energy efficiency in their factories and speed up investment in renewable energy.

Trueanalog Strictly OEM, a factory producing loudspeakers near Guangzhou, is emblematic of the crunch already hitting exporters from frequent outages. Owner Philip Richardson said his company was stuck “playing catch-up”. “It’s the domino effect when you cut electricity: it directly affects the glues in the production line, we have to reset the jigging, it removes 20 to 30 per cent of productivity from the day . . . It’s really a hassle,” he said.

Will Jones, chief operating officer for the British Home Enhancement Trade Association, said a third of members in the DIY and gardening sector reported that suppliers had extended their lead times. The knock-on effect, Jones said, was further inflationary pressure and a wider range of product shortages. “This is having an impact on an already very challenging situation for suppliers with constraints on the availability of space on container ships and spiralling costs,” said Jones.

The Chinese government has taken a short-term pragmatic approach to addressing the energy shortfall by reverting to dirtier fuels, despite its longer-term promises to cut coal. Over the past week, the government ordered a rapid expansion of coal mines. It also decreed sweeping market reforms, forcing all coal-fired power generators to sell into the wholesale market, allowing electricity prices to rise by as much as 20 per cent, and lifting price caps for some big users. The market overhaul is a “huge step” towards liberalisation of the power sector, said David Fishman, an energy analyst at the Lantau Group.

The government’s actions, however, are not expected to end power supply disruptions immediately. Alongside strains in the property sector, the shortages have added a large dose of uncertainty to Chinese third quarter growth figures, due on Monday. Compared to a searing 7.9 per cent expansion in the second quarter, forecasts from economists surveyed by Bloomberg range from a high of 5.8 per cent to a low of 4.5 per cent. “A lot of the companies were really surprised by the intensity” of the shortages, said Thomas Luedi, a Shanghai-based energy expert at consultancy Bain. But they had to “recognise it might be the case again towards the end of the year”. Luedi added that energy price increases would quickly compel some manufacturers to cut production, providing a measure of relief to the strained power grid. “Inefficient producers might fall off the cliff,” he said, pointing to smaller-scale makers of smelting materials such as ferromanganese and metallurgical grade silicon as the likely early victims.

In Guangdong, China’s biggest manufacturing hub, senior officials said almost 150,000 companies had been hit by energy shortages last month, people familiar with a government briefing told the Financial Times. In a concession that the problems could not be solved immediately, Guangdong officials have privately warned that rationing would probably persist. They also encouraged companies to use their own electricity generation, which probably means even greater use of diesel for power generation. “A lot of companies are going to go back to their backyard generators. Some of them are illegal. They will have to retrofit them, but that’s a lot faster than starting up a power plant,” said a businessman in southern China, who asked not to be named. “The shortages are eliminating 30 to 40 per cent of operation time and trading companies are experiencing the same downside,” he said, adding power shortages would not “go away tomorrow”. Richardson, the factory owner, has resorted to firing up diesel generation despite a fivefold cost increase, to get his loudspeakers to customers in Europe and the US. He has also brought in temporary staff for overnight shifts and is turning to higher-cost airfreight as a workaround for clogged ports.

Even companies well-placed to benefit from the government’s response — such as those selling mining services and back-up power generation — are faced with problems seizing the opportunity. Nathan Stoner, who leads the China operations of Cummins, a US mining and power industry group, said “while there are some opportunities”, the company’s operations had been constrained by power cuts hitting its factories and those of its component suppliers.

In Britain, Steve Levy, managing director of UK retailer Heat Outdoors, said all but one of his Chinese suppliers of outdoor heaters and hand dryers, which are mainly based in Jiangsu and Guangdong, had experienced part-week shutdowns. Lead times from one Chinese supplier had jumped to six months, up from four months during most of the pandemic and 10 weeks before coronavirus struck. “I can’t make a decision for April,” Levy said, because he had “no idea” what the market would be like then."

End quote

Given China's attempt to coerce my country through its ban on Australian coal, wine, barley and a raft of other products I can't say I have a lot of sympathy for Xi Jinping, although it's a pity that the Chinese population has to suffer for their government's sins. However this is a taste of what is to come for the rest of us if we attempt the "decarbonisation of the economy" lunacy promoted by the eco-jihadists.
 

Canip

Well-known member
i bought from fruugo Switzerland, which is a (probably Chinese) distributor similar to alibaba.
I got confirmation of dispatch from HongKong within a few hours and received the bino within 7 days, so there were no issues with export/transport.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Although off topic, can the large scale users of energy, such as in making ceramics and steel, use the waste heat to power heating for homes?

Does the waste heat just go up into the air as waste heat?

I am not an active eco warrier, but human beings cannot carry on as they have been for the last fifty years.

If one billion people were magically transported to Mars, the Earth would still be vastly overpopulated and living far beyond their means.

The crunch has to come sooner or later.

It is going to hurt.

Regards,
B.
 

dries1

Member
No, It was a comment from someone who has the early Zenrays still, and he compared them to the SV Bony. But as there so many of these start up these days it would not surprise me if they came from the same place of manufacture, with a different brand name.
 

Stevenkelby

Well-known member
Australia
OUCH!!! CHF219 =$Aus330! On Amazon Australia the price went up to $Aus180 (CHF115) from the $Aus104 less than 2 weeks ago (although that was a discounted special at $115 less a 10% off coupon) . Those prices are from a supplier named Retevis which seems to be Svbony's parent company (Shenzhen Retevis Technology). They claim to have distribution centres in the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Spain so availability in Europe should be good. Canip did you buy from the official Svbony Amazon store or via eBay? I notice that a lot of the prices on eBay Australia are considerably higher.

Another problem is that there are a lot of problems currently with getting product out of China to overseas markets, starting with Covid shutdowns of the factories and their suppliers through to shipping shortages pushing up freight rates. Just look at the 2 years of delays APM has had in actually receiving their new 6x30ED bins. If you're a business that doesn't know when you're going to get the next resupply it doesn't make sense to discount your existing stock. This situation doesn't look like improving any time soon. China is currently ordering industries to shut down because of power rationing due to coal shortages and the early onset of winter.

From the Financial Times - China’s energy crisis threatens lengthy disruption to global supply chain

"Factory owners in China and their customers worldwide have been told to prepare for power supply disruptions becoming part of life as President Xi Jinping doggedly weans the world’s second-biggest economy off its dependence on coal. Months of shortages have cut power to households in China’s north-east and caused outages at factories across the country. But energy demand is still surging amid record demand for Chinese exports, and the problems will be compounded by the prospect of freezing temperatures in winter. Despite a flurry of central government interventions, spearheaded by premier Li Keqiang, Chinese manufacturers and multinationals alike have been urged to boost energy efficiency in their factories and speed up investment in renewable energy.

Trueanalog Strictly OEM, a factory producing loudspeakers near Guangzhou, is emblematic of the crunch already hitting exporters from frequent outages. Owner Philip Richardson said his company was stuck “playing catch-up”. “It’s the domino effect when you cut electricity: it directly affects the glues in the production line, we have to reset the jigging, it removes 20 to 30 per cent of productivity from the day . . . It’s really a hassle,” he said.

Will Jones, chief operating officer for the British Home Enhancement Trade Association, said a third of members in the DIY and gardening sector reported that suppliers had extended their lead times. The knock-on effect, Jones said, was further inflationary pressure and a wider range of product shortages. “This is having an impact on an already very challenging situation for suppliers with constraints on the availability of space on container ships and spiralling costs,” said Jones.

The Chinese government has taken a short-term pragmatic approach to addressing the energy shortfall by reverting to dirtier fuels, despite its longer-term promises to cut coal. Over the past week, the government ordered a rapid expansion of coal mines. It also decreed sweeping market reforms, forcing all coal-fired power generators to sell into the wholesale market, allowing electricity prices to rise by as much as 20 per cent, and lifting price caps for some big users. The market overhaul is a “huge step” towards liberalisation of the power sector, said David Fishman, an energy analyst at the Lantau Group.

The government’s actions, however, are not expected to end power supply disruptions immediately. Alongside strains in the property sector, the shortages have added a large dose of uncertainty to Chinese third quarter growth figures, due on Monday. Compared to a searing 7.9 per cent expansion in the second quarter, forecasts from economists surveyed by Bloomberg range from a high of 5.8 per cent to a low of 4.5 per cent. “A lot of the companies were really surprised by the intensity” of the shortages, said Thomas Luedi, a Shanghai-based energy expert at consultancy Bain. But they had to “recognise it might be the case again towards the end of the year”. Luedi added that energy price increases would quickly compel some manufacturers to cut production, providing a measure of relief to the strained power grid. “Inefficient producers might fall off the cliff,” he said, pointing to smaller-scale makers of smelting materials such as ferromanganese and metallurgical grade silicon as the likely early victims.

In Guangdong, China’s biggest manufacturing hub, senior officials said almost 150,000 companies had been hit by energy shortages last month, people familiar with a government briefing told the Financial Times. In a concession that the problems could not be solved immediately, Guangdong officials have privately warned that rationing would probably persist. They also encouraged companies to use their own electricity generation, which probably means even greater use of diesel for power generation. “A lot of companies are going to go back to their backyard generators. Some of them are illegal. They will have to retrofit them, but that’s a lot faster than starting up a power plant,” said a businessman in southern China, who asked not to be named. “The shortages are eliminating 30 to 40 per cent of operation time and trading companies are experiencing the same downside,” he said, adding power shortages would not “go away tomorrow”. Richardson, the factory owner, has resorted to firing up diesel generation despite a fivefold cost increase, to get his loudspeakers to customers in Europe and the US. He has also brought in temporary staff for overnight shifts and is turning to higher-cost airfreight as a workaround for clogged ports.

Even companies well-placed to benefit from the government’s response — such as those selling mining services and back-up power generation — are faced with problems seizing the opportunity. Nathan Stoner, who leads the China operations of Cummins, a US mining and power industry group, said “while there are some opportunities”, the company’s operations had been constrained by power cuts hitting its factories and those of its component suppliers.

In Britain, Steve Levy, managing director of UK retailer Heat Outdoors, said all but one of his Chinese suppliers of outdoor heaters and hand dryers, which are mainly based in Jiangsu and Guangdong, had experienced part-week shutdowns. Lead times from one Chinese supplier had jumped to six months, up from four months during most of the pandemic and 10 weeks before coronavirus struck. “I can’t make a decision for April,” Levy said, because he had “no idea” what the market would be like then."

End quote

Given China's attempt to coerce my country through its ban on Australian coal, wine, barley and a raft of other products I can't say I have a lot of sympathy for Xi Jinping, although it's a pity that the Chinese population has to suffer for their government's sins. However this is a taste of what is to come for the rest of us if we attempt the "decarbonisation of the economy" lunacy promoted by the eco-jihadists.
Thanks for sharing the article, but I find myself at odds with your final sentence.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Although off topic, can the large scale users of energy, such as in making ceramics and steel, use the waste heat to power heating for homes?

Short answer: NO, these industries are not located in large population centres. They are located where their resources are: suitable clay for ceramics and brickworks, coal for brickworks and steel production, limestone for cement making. These are not necessarily where people are living, but even if you discovered a massive coal deposit under a city the cost of resuming all the private houses would be prohibitive, not to mention all the political problems. These waste heat proposals also ignore the costs of installing all the piping necessary to heat domestic housing, all for less than 6 months a year. In the remainder of the year you'll still have to vent the waste heat.

I see you still subscribe to the overpopulation canard. Back in 1984 I was doing some analysis on resource intensity in developed and developing economies, which involved looking up population figures. I was struck by the fact that ALL of the Western European countries had essentially ZERO population growth - without immigration they would have had negative population growth. That's true for every developed country - the underlying fertility rate is below replacement. Developed countries that do have higher rates of population growth - USA, Canada, Australia - do so due to higher immigration because not only do immigrants directly add to population but they also tend to be in their childbearing years. Without the immigrants they would also have negative population growth. That same process is ongoing in the developing world, as the population's income grows they have smaller families. This is conveniently ignored by the eco-warriors whose underlying aim is to keep the people of developing countries desperately poor in the name of their great god The Environment.

The truth that the eco-warriors don't want you to hear is that overwhelmingly the environment is getting better, not worse. Buildings and monuments in Britain that were black from decades of coal burning domestic fires are now clean, London no longer suffers from its deadly peasouper fogs. The rivers in the UK are cleaner than 100 years ago. Same goes for all the other developed countries. That environmental cleanup will also happen in India and China as their people become wealthier. As for the so-called "climate crisis" how can there be a crisis if there hasn't been any discernible warming trend in the last 20+ years? Have you noticed that we no longer hear about "global warming", it's now "climate change". Well the climate is always changing in a cyclic fashion, as anyone that examined the records of 20th Century temperatures can attest.

I don't want this thread to divert into an environment wrangle. If you wish to continue the debate please message me directly.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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