• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Third bird on the right......? (1 Viewer)

KenM

Well-known member
This am NE.London...firing a burst shot at one of my local Buzzards before disappearing over roof, 'pon inspection, I noted the 3rd bird to the right, probably something obvious, however am having trouble reconciling to an ID?

The 2nd image was shot yesterday...thinking that it looks a bit big for a male Sprawk, even though in overall length as compared to the Magpie that's what it compares (sizes) to ?

The 3rd image (yesterday) a diving Accip again...a fore-shortened big chest and rounded tail ?

The 4th image, interaction between two Sprawks, again one being slightly bigger than tother, both males?

Cheers
 

Attachments

  • P1820960.jpeg  Third bird on the right..jpeg
    P1820960.jpeg Third bird on the right..jpeg
    46.4 KB · Views: 221
  • P1820849.jpeg  Mag v Sprawk.jpeg
    P1820849.jpeg Mag v Sprawk.jpeg
    48.1 KB · Views: 190
  • P1820953.jpeg   Diving Accip..jpeg
    P1820953.jpeg Diving Accip..jpeg
    55.3 KB · Views: 156
  • P1820901.jpeg   Double Sprawk 1.jpeg
    P1820901.jpeg Double Sprawk 1.jpeg
    47.5 KB · Views: 165

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
How about Mistle Thrush? Can just about see the underwing pattern. Also size and character suggests it could be "seeing off" a bop from its territory.

I think Fieldfares are just happy to feed and survive the winter before returning to their breeding grounds whereas Stormcocks are thinking about pairing up and nesting early into the New Year when the daylight hours lengthen.

P
 
Last edited:

KenM

Well-known member
How about Mistle Thrush? Can just about see the underwing pattern. Also size and character suggests it could be "seeing off" a bop from its territory.

I think Fieldfares are just happy to feed and survive the winter before returning to their breeding grounds whereas Stormcocks are thinking about pairing up and nesting early into the New Year when the daylight hours lengthen.

P
A good shout but the underwing should be plain?
What bothers me Pat is....if you compare the size relativity between the subject and the corvid, if brought closer to the Corvid, it seems that it would appear to be relatively big? Probably an optical illusion...thoroughly confused...?
 

KenM

Well-known member

stevethehydra

Well-known member
I've never seen a Mistle Thrush interacting with a Buzzard, but they absolutely hate corvids (presumably because egg predators?) - I wouldn't be surprised if this was a "chain mobbing" situation with the MT "mobbing"* the crow as the crow is mobbing the buzzard...

*is it still "mobbing" if it's a single bird doing it???
 

KenM

Well-known member
*is it still "mobbing" if it's a single bird doing it???

I believe so Steve, when a single Corvid interacts with a considered predator...BOP or Heron it in effect would still be “mobbing” even though it sounds plural....I think :eek!:
 

johnallcock

Well-known member
Is the bird even interacting with the crow & buzzard? Given that it's so out of focus, it's presumably in a very different plane from those two birds. I assumed it was just a bird that happened to be flying through when the photo was taken.

If that's the case, then size is impossible to judge, and plumage is impossible to judge... is there really any point trying to ID?
 

KenM

Well-known member
Is the bird even interacting with the crow & buzzard? Given that it's so out of focus, it's presumably in a very different plane from those two birds. I assumed it was just a bird that happened to be flying through when the photo was taken.

If that's the case, then size is impossible to judge, and plumage is impossible to judge... is there really any point trying to ID?

John, it was not seen during the shutterburst, only afterwards on review. Even with an image as bad as it is, one could normally assign it to a group. However this intrigued!...as has been suggested, a Turdus sp might appear more likely...albeit an optical illusion a large one at that...dunno?

Cheers
 

Rotherbirder

Well-known member
Cheers Daniel...have you got Father Ted’s phone no? ;)



.....welcome aboard Rother, a chance for you to impress the forum with your profound wisdom and experience....the stage is set...I’d have thought you might be qualified enough to comment on image 2?
Let’s see the reasoning of your wisdom there. ;)

Well hello Ken; good to see you're back flogging your poor old dead horse again. In image 2, if the two birds are in the same plane of focus, your raptor can only be a Sparrowhawk - game over!

RB
 

KenM

Well-known member
Well hello Ken; good to see you're back flogging your poor old dead horse again. In image 2, if the two birds are in the same plane of focus, your raptor can only be a Sparrowhawk - game over!

RB

Oh I see where we have a x’d wire! Remiss if me, I wasn’t enquiring as to what it was...as I see them daily (almost..for the last 35 years), I wanted an opinion on gender, as to my eye there is often variability in size for both! Big females and small males no problem! It’s the “in betweenies”....game on!
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top