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This is one brilliant image! (1 Viewer)

delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
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Scotland
Crikey!! Thanks KC, that a superb picture, isn't it.
 

StuartReeves

Local rarity
Great photo which makes it all the more frustrating that the photographer hasn't given any information about how and where it was taken.
 

Lisa W

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I would say not too far to the birds nest myself...which for me doesn't make it such a good shot

If that is true the photo needs to go - however, are you stating a fact or merely conjecture?
 

scary-canary

Canaries forever... and i'm not always scary, some
If that is true the photo needs to go - however, are you stating a fact or merely conjecture?

You could surely take a photo like that, assuming you had the skill(!), at a place like the Farne Isles without being accused of disturbing its nest. Probably best not to start a witch hunt yet.
Chris
 

ptickner

Well-known member
I know it isn't the same photo, but it sure looks a lot like this one from the cover of a David Tipling photo book!
 

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KC Foggin

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Just because there is no info on this photo, you cannot just assume it was taken near a nest. If you take the time to look at the poster's gallery, no info is given under any photo.

We've got lots of members here that don't care about the scientific name or how/where it was taken. Just that they got the photo. More photographer than birder
 

Ben Nevis

Well-known member
Can't see any other reason for getting a shot like that,unless they were near the nest.Unless It was taken by a fish.
 

Gomphus

Well-known member
Can't see any other reason for getting a shot like that,unless they were near the nest.Unless It was taken by a fish.

Have a vaguely similar shot of a bird diving on slide (but no where near as good!) from the Farnes from years ago, you cannot avoid them on there! As you walk round you run the gauntlet all the time as the birds dive on you. Its not too difficult to snatch shots on there, even as they come down on you if you have quick reflexes, and are wearing a hat! But you need better skill/gear to get images like this one than I ever had. I have a picture somewhere of me with an Arctic sat on the brim of my baseball hat from the Farnes too. This year when we visited even reaching the loos was interesting through the courtyard!
The birds have 100's of visitors walking the paths and snapping away!

We should not jump to conclusions too quickly perhaps..... its a cracking image.

atb
 
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Robin Edwards

Well-known member
Can't see any other reason for getting a shot like that,unless they were near the nest.Unless It was taken by a fish.

Any visitor (there will be thousands) to inner Farne in May or June will be within a few feet of nesting arctic terns and puffins if they walk the board walks. I'm not sure of any evidence that populations are adversely affected?
 

Barred Wobbler

Well-known member
Once you step off the boat onto the boardwalk on Inner Farne. It's impossible to avoid close contact with the Arctic terns. Some of the nests are within inches of the boardwalk and they raise chicks without any problems.

Look on the birdguides photos of Arctic terns. Pictures like the one in the gallery abound, usually taken at the same time as puffins returning to their nest holes with beaks full of sandeels.
 

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