• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Thrush ID. Please - Jacksonville, Fl. USA (1 Viewer)

Newton-W

Well-known member
This was taken 4/28/20 in Jacksonville, Fl. I thought it was a hermit Thrush, but it was quite a bit bigger that what I'm used to seeing, plus it's not quite as brown as most. maybe a Veery? Or gray-cheeked?
Thanks in advance for any clarification.

Newton
 

Attachments

  • HermitThrush-00001a.JPG
    HermitThrush-00001a.JPG
    556.2 KB · Views: 116
  • HermitThrush-00002a.JPG
    HermitThrush-00002a.JPG
    574.3 KB · Views: 92

KenM

Well-known member
That eye-ring is extremely white and contrasting, thus I’d lean towards Hermit Thrush.

Cheers
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
That eye-ring is extremely white and contrasting, thus I’d lean towards Hermit Thrush.

Cheers

Can't argue too much as I must confess to never having seen HT but seems to have a grey tail and the obvious loral line connecting the eye ring which creates 'spectacles'?
 
Last edited:

KenM

Well-known member
Yes: no red tail so not hermit

I believe the lighting has made the image look quite cold and on such an acute angle as per subject bird this can obscure the “rufous tail”, that said, every Swainson’s that I’ve seen if memory serves, invariably has a creamy wash to the eye-ring/face. From personal experience I can recall imaging Hermit Thrush at such angles and struggled to see rufous in the tail.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
I believe the lighting has made the image look quite cold and on such an acute angle as per subject bird this can obscure the “rufous tail”, that said, every Swainson’s that I’ve seen if memory serves, invariably has a creamy wash to the eye-ring/face. From personal experience I can recall imaging Hermit Thrush at such angles and struggled to see rufous in the tail.

But they don't often show the obvious loral line.
 

Newton-W

Well-known member
I believe the lighting has made the image look quite cold and on such an acute angle as per subject bird this can obscure the “rufous tail”, that said, every Swainson’s that I’ve seen if memory serves, invariably has a creamy wash to the eye-ring/face. From personal experience I can recall imaging Hermit Thrush at such angles and struggled to see rufous in the tail.

Ken, I totally agree. The lighting was awful and even though it was mid-day, the tree canopy made it difficult, given the 10 seconds that it was there, to adjust my settings. I can say that through the lens, the bird appeared to be more brown and i should have mentioned that in my posting info. Hermits are by far the most common thrush I see in my yard, so I just automatically thought that was what it is.
Thank you for your assessment.
 

birdmeister

Well-known member
United States
Slam-dunk Swainson's for me. Hermit should show a bit more contrast in the wing and more color on the flanks. Also, the chest spots should "pop" more on Hermit. I just can't ignore those spectacles either, as well as buffy face as compared to white belly.

Also, I believe Swainson's is now the expected thrush there given the date. A check of eBird reveals only two Hermit Thrush records in the past 10 years for the whole state of Florida in May. A check of April records near Jacksonville shows most Hermits gone around April 15, with a few into the 20s.
 
Last edited:

Newton-W

Well-known member
Slam-dunk Swainson's for me. Hermit should show a bit more contrast in the wing and more color on the flanks. Also, the chest spots should "pop" more on Hermit. I just can't ignore those spectacles either, as well as buffy face as compared to white belly.

Also, I believe Swainson's is now the expected thrush there given the date. A check of eBird reveals only two Hermit Thrush records in the past 10 years for the whole state of Florida in May. A check of April records near Jacksonville shows most Hermits gone around April 15, with a few into the 20s.

Thank you, birdmeister! Once again, I overlooked the obvious... ebird records. My last sighting of the HT was 4/16/20 and if I had bothered to turn yesterdays sighting in (I'm usually a few days late in reporting), I would have found that it's not even available to tic. Lordy Lou, sometimes I wonder about myself, LOLOLO!
 

KenM

Well-known member
Slam-dunk Swainson's for me. Hermit should show a bit more contrast in the wing and more color on the flanks. Also, the chest spots should "pop" more on Hermit. I just can't ignore those spectacles either, as well as buffy face as compared to white belly.

Also, I believe Swainson's is now the expected thrush there given the date. A check of eBird reveals only two Hermit Thrush records in the past 10 years for the whole state of Florida in May. A check of April records near Jacksonville shows most Hermits gone around April 15, with a few into the 20s.

Well you can’t argue with date stats and they appear to strongly favour Swainson’s, the only comment I would make is that most of, if not all my ST’s have been seen in the NW, and my recollections are of birds with a more Buffy head wash and certainly not as crisp and contrasty as the second image.

Cheers
 

Newton-W

Well-known member
Well you can’t argue with date stats and they appear to strongly favour Swainson’s, the only comment I would make is that most of, if not all my ST’s have been seen in the NW, and my recollections are of birds with a more Buffy head wash and certainly not as crisp and contrasty as the second image.

Cheers

Thank you, Ken. I get a couple of shots of the Swainson's every year, but they are rare in my yard. I also get some Wood Thrush and Veery, but once again, I have to be on my toes to get a shot.

Newton
 

KenM

Well-known member
Thank you, Ken. I get a couple of shots of the Swainson's every year, but they are rare in my yard. I also get some Wood Thrush and Veery, but once again, I have to be on my toes to get a shot.

Newton

A great group of Thrushes there Newton, my favourite East coast Thrush just has to be Wood Thrush, haven’t quite managed to get a definitive image of one yet...but still hoping. Regarding Swainson’s which I’m most familiar with, as when I holiday in the NWest they’re not uncommon especially in August.

Thus when I hike the woods there, I often elicit their “whit” call and on occasion I’ve managed to call them out...you’ve got to get the “pucker” and the “pitch” right though, always great fun. :t:

Cheers
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
A great group of Thrushes there Newton, my favourite East coast Thrush just has to be Wood Thrush, haven’t quite managed to get a definitive image of one yet...but still hoping. Regarding Swainson’s which I’m most familiar with, as when I holiday in the NWest they’re not uncommon especially in August.

Thus when I hike the woods there, I often elicit their “whit” call and on occasion I’ve managed to call them out...you’ve got to get the “pucker” and the “pitch” right though, always great fun. :t:

Cheers

Stunning birds when seen in sunlight, on the forest floor, one of my favourite memories of Costa Rica was the first one we found.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Depending on where in the NW you are, you might be in areas occupied by different subspecies of Swainson's.

Niels
 

KenM

Well-known member
Stunning birds when seen in sunlight, on the forest floor, one of my favourite memories of Costa Rica was the first one we found.

No doubts there Andy! When seen as you say in dappled sunlight...they’re absolutely stunning!


Depending on where in the NW you are, you might be in areas occupied by different subspecies of Swainson's.

Niels

Portland, Oregon is generally my base Niels and all points West. :t:
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
No doubts there Andy! When seen as you say in dappled sunlight...they’re absolutely stunning!




Portland, Oregon is generally my base Niels and all points West. :t:

First Swainson's I ever saw was in Bolivia. I thought "what's that bird that looks like a song thrush?". Still remind me of them: in same way I think "chiffchaff" when I see Tennessee warbler.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top