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Thylacine rediscovery? (1 Viewer)

raymie

Well-known member
United States
People have been claiming to have found Thylacines for years, they are usually either Feral Dogs or Red Foxes with mange.
 

Llandudnoboy

North wales coast Peter
On last count, five totally new species of creatures, were discovered by naturalists, in 2019-20.

One was a primate, and the other were lizards and insects.

The fact that no Thylacine has been seen, since the death of the last one in Hobart Zoo, does not rule out, the tiny possibility, that a few creatures still survive in the wild of Tasmania.

Its unlikely, but there are known cases, of thought extinct creatures being rediscovered.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
On last count, five totally new species of creatures, were discovered by naturalists, in 2019-20.

One was a primate, and the other were lizards and insects.

The fact that no Thylacine has been seen, since the death of the last one in Hobart Zoo, does not rule out, the tiny possibility, that a few creatures still survive in the wild of Tasmania.

Its unlikely, but there are known cases, of thought extinct creatures being rediscovered.
Tasmania being only half the size of England does though. Where was the primate - South America or Africa?

John
 

opisska

Jan Ebr
Poland
To be honest, Tasmania may be superficially small, but it contains more unoutched wilderness than the entire European continent. The wild roughly quarter of Tasmania is mostly impenetrable ... Still, this particular instance is silly.
 

Steve Babbs

Well-known member
Anyone up for a twitch in 2022? Or perhaps not. I'd love my cynicism to be proved wrong. I remember get one of my first wildlife books as a kid and looking at a photo and thinking I'd love to see one of them.
 

Welsh Peregrine

Well-known member
On last count, five totally new species of creatures, were discovered by naturalists, in 2019-20.

One was a primate, and the other were lizards and insects.

The fact that no Thylacine has been seen, since the death of the last one in Hobart Zoo, does not rule out, the tiny possibility, that a few creatures still survive in the wild of Tasmania.

Its unlikely, but there are known cases, of thought extinct creatures being rediscovered.
I don’t know what you are basing your discovery numbers on; there was a new mouse lemur and a new langur in that period, and at least 500 species named by Natural History Museum scientists in just one of these years. However, some of these, like the langur, have been known previously, but not recognised as species. Anyway, organisms differ enormously in their conspicuousness. I would love the Thylacine to survive, but the longer that there is a lack of convincing evidence, the less likely this becomes.
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
I mean, a new species of baleen whale was just described a few months ago (from the Gulf of Mexico nonetheless!), so there are certainly some interesting mammals and birds out there waiting to be discovered or identified.
 

Mikewander

Active member
Scotland
I think any major new discoveries will come from the deep areas of the oceans. Probably the least explored area on the planet.
 

Xenospiza

Distracted
Supporter
Tasmania being only half the size of England does though. Where was the primate - South America or Africa?

John
A langur in Myanmar, which had been considered a known species.
In 2019 a new titi monkey was described from Brazil (similar story).
 

Welsh Peregrine

Well-known member
Note that these are both difficult species to observe at the best of times. Thylacines (and Ivory-billed Woodpeckers) were relatively easy to find prior to their population collapses. Off hand, I cannot think of a terrestrial species that was easy to see before collapse, which has since been rediscovered, which counts against survival of these species.
 

James Lowther

Well-known member
Note that these are both difficult species to observe at the best of times. Thylacines (and Ivory-billed Woodpeckers) were relatively easy to find prior to their population collapses. Off hand, I cannot think of a terrestrial species that was easy to see before collapse, which has since been rediscovered, which counts against survival of these species.
maybe Takahe?
 

Welsh Peregrine

Well-known member
Takahe isn’t easy in its original range (but that may be because Lake Te Anau is inaccessible). Not sure you could describe it as easy before either; think it was only seen 4 or 5 times by Europeans before disappearing.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Note that these are both difficult species to observe at the best of times. Thylacines (and Ivory-billed Woodpeckers) were relatively easy to find prior to their population collapses. Off hand, I cannot think of a terrestrial species that was easy to see before collapse, which has since been rediscovered, which counts against survival of these species.
One example might be Kaempfer's Woodpecker, which was only known from a 1920s specimen until 2006, when it was rediscovered in Tocantins. It's not particularly rare or difficult to see there these days. I've no idea why no one saw it for 80 years.
 

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